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By PETER BAKER | January 3, 1993
Shortly after noon on New Year's Day, Jim Gracie, Richard Schad and Wally Vait stood in the parking lot at the end of Bunker Hill Road, close alongside a slower section of the Gunpowder River, awaiting the arrival of other members of Trout Unlimited."
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Dan Rodricks | August 26, 2011
"There is no guarantee that when a middle-aged man enters the dark forest where the black dog is waiting, he will come out healed. It is possible to be broken there beyond hope of repair. " -- Howell Raines, from "Fly Fishing Through The Midlife Crisis" Mike Flanagan and I became friends after his major league pitching career ended and most of his old teammates and fishing buddies from the glory years of the Baltimore Orioles had scattered across the country. We were transplanted New Englanders, rooted in Maryland and approaching middle age with fly rods in our hands -- mine in my right, Mike's in his left.
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By Matthew Purdy and Matthew Purdy,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 20, 2003
CEDAR GROVE, N.J. -- Back when the Peckman River was a watery dump for sewage, grass clippings and broken furniture, the notion of its becoming a trout stream seemed like a fantasy. But two sewage plants on the small river were upgraded. Residents cleared debris, then began stocking the river with trout. The state wants to label this unremarkable river in the unbroken sprawl of northern New Jersey a trout stream. The moral of the tale: Be careful what you fish for. The federal Clean Water Act, filtered through the state bureaucracy, is emitting a fine mess.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
NEWS
September 22, 1998
THE DISPUTE over the temperature of water discharged from the Hampstead wastewater treatment plant into Piney Run illustrates the complexities of anti-pollution laws -- and the hidden threat of thermal pollution.It also highlights different visions of the area's future: Carroll County favors more development there; Baltimore County, just across the county line, does not.Baltimore County residents charge that effluent from the Carroll plant is too warm for a state-protected trout stream: The legal limit is 68 degrees or the ambient water temperature.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | December 12, 1990
Stunned by an electric current shooting through the water, hundreds of tiny black-nosed dace turned belly up and floated to the surface.Biologists, armed with electrodes, even ferreted a dozen or more eel out of the shadowy embankments of the Jabez Branch yesterday morning.But the brook trout were no where to be found."If they were there, they would come zooming out and boink their nose right into the screen (of the electrode)," said Mark Staley, a conservation associate with the state Department of Natural Resources.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
In the 1970s, while gas and diesel fuel were in short supply in the United States, a considerable segment of the boating population switched from powerboats to sailboats. In the early- and mid-1980s, sailboat production in the United States and Canada continued to increase.In the late 1980s the industry entered a tailspin, with production of new boats dropping and the used boat market floundering in a high tide of sailboats no one wanted or could afford to buy.International Marine, a leading supplier of marine accessories and original equipment, says that its annual study of U.S. and Canadian builders shows the sailboat industry hit low ebb two years ago and last year made a 22 percent overall increase beyond 1991 figures.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | October 21, 1990
WOODBINE - Trout and wetlands are among the obstacles to county plans for a reservoir aimed at providing an adequate water supply for South Carroll.About 80 people turned out Wednesday at Mount Olive Methodist Church as county planners delivered an update on the Gillis Falls Reservoir, a 430-acre lake that would supply projected water needs for South Carroll at least through the year 2040.But in the quest for permits, the county has met resistance from the Maryland Department of the Environment and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, said Carroll planner Marlene Conaway.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1996
A stubborn, two-year dispute over water draining from a Pennsylvania housing development into Baltimore County may be coming to an end.The contractor building the homes near New Freedom began work last week on his part of a deal with county officials to route the water through a grass swale and into a 1,360-foot-long pipe leading to Bee Tree Run. That is designed to end complaints of flooded yards along Keeney Road -- waters that turn icy in winter.The...
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2008
Maryland's premier trout stream, Gunpowder Falls, is under attack from an algae strain feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Heavy, with the consistency of a wool coat, Didymosphenia geminata is a recent invader of East Coast waterways. It begins as microscopic organism that travels from stream to stream on boats, fishing gear and the bottoms of felt boots and waders. The algae is not hazardous to humans, but could have a "profound" effect on fish and the quality of freshwater streams and recreation, upsetting the delicate balance of nature, said Jonathan McKnight, coordinator of the Department of Natural Resources invasive species team.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2003
THURMONT - Beyond the countless no-trespassing signs, up the poorly paved winding road, stands a 450-acre wooded parcel about to go up for auction, a retreat that has been a well-kept secret in Frederick County despite its storied history. President Herbert Hoover slept here, in a stone cottage high above a raging trout stream where he loved to perfect his fly-fishing techniques by day. Other presidents and their families fished here, too. Tricia Nixon, President Richard M. Nixon's elder daughter, reportedly spent part of her honeymoon at the retreat, sitting on the banks as she patiently watched her new husband, Edward Cox, cast his line.
NEWS
By Matthew Purdy and Matthew Purdy,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 20, 2003
CEDAR GROVE, N.J. -- Back when the Peckman River was a watery dump for sewage, grass clippings and broken furniture, the notion of its becoming a trout stream seemed like a fantasy. But two sewage plants on the small river were upgraded. Residents cleared debris, then began stocking the river with trout. The state wants to label this unremarkable river in the unbroken sprawl of northern New Jersey a trout stream. The moral of the tale: Be careful what you fish for. The federal Clean Water Act, filtered through the state bureaucracy, is emitting a fine mess.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2001
State environmental officials say not just one mistake but a series of errors took place at a Cecil County hazardous waste site where an earthen dam blew out in December, severely damaging a prime spawning area in one of Maryland's finest trout streams. The mistakes occurred while representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Maryland Department of the Environment, and at least three private companies monitored construction at the Woodlawn County Landfill, a Superfund site being cleaned up under EPA auspices.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 15, 2001
Restoration work could begin next week on a Cecil County trout stream that was damaged when a sediment holding pond on a nearby hazardous waste site failed, state officials said yesterday. In the wake of the December accident, sediment clogged an unnamed stream that flows into Basin Run, downhill from the Woodlawn County Landfill, a federal Superfund site. The stream is the Basin Run watershed's main trout-spawning area, say biologists from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2008
Maryland's premier trout stream, Gunpowder Falls, is under attack from an algae strain feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Heavy, with the consistency of a wool coat, Didymosphenia geminata is a recent invader of East Coast waterways. It begins as microscopic organism that travels from stream to stream on boats, fishing gear and the bottoms of felt boots and waders. The algae is not hazardous to humans, but could have a "profound" effect on fish and the quality of freshwater streams and recreation, upsetting the delicate balance of nature, said Jonathan McKnight, coordinator of the Department of Natural Resources invasive species team.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
A shadow beneath the rippling surface of Quail Creek caught the eye of James Gracie."There he is!" he exclaimed, wading knee-deep into a chilly pool overhung by a tree branch. A moment later, a small brook trout darted downstream.The fish is a harbinger of new life in this narrow creek, which meanders through a sylvan patch of northern Baltimore County on its way to Gunpowder Falls. It also may be a glimmer of hope for some of the 5,000 miles of brooks, streams and rivers throughout Maryland that are barren of fish, or nearly so.Three years ago, Quail Creek's headwaters were smothered under 120 tons of mud when an earthen dam built across the stream by a housing developer gave way. The silt filled in pools and riffles where trout had fed and spawned, and it triggered large-scale erosion of the stream's banks.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Heather Dewar and Candus Thomson and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2001
RISING SUN -- State biologists say one of Maryland's finest trout streams has been badly damaged by a construction accident at a nearby hazardous waste site that was being cleaned up under the supervision of the federal Environmental Protection Agency. State and federal officials said a construction error caused a collapse in a 20-foot-tall berm surrounding a sediment pond at the Woodlawn Landfill, a federal Superfund site in rural Cecil County. The accident on Dec. 19 sent a torrent of sediment into an unnamed stream that is a breeding ground for brown trout, smallmouth bass, bluegill and other fish.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS | November 12, 2000
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va -- Preliminary findings from a survey conducted in April of 452 Virginia brook trout streams indicate some recovery from the acidification levels found in a 1987 baseline survey. The results will require further analysis because they may be strongly influenced by differences in stream flows at different times -- the sampling in April 1987 took place under much wetter conditions than sampling in April 2000. Also, long-term monitoring during the 12-year period indicates acidification is continuing for most Virginia brook trout streams.
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