Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTrough
IN THE NEWS

Trough

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jon Morgan Thomas W. Waldron and Jon Morgan Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | December 13, 1990
A controversial plan to dump dredged material in an area of Chesapeake Bay known as the Deep Trough appears to be doomed by opposition from Gov. William Donald Schaefer.In his strongest statement yet on the subject, Schaefer declared yesterday at a meeting of the Board of Public Works: "You're not going to get in that trough for four years. . . . I am not going into that Deep Trough unless the world collapses." Schaefer spoke as a dredging-disposal plan was briefly discussed.The remarks cheered at least one environmentalist.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | January 31, 2008
Scientists poring over the first closeup pictures of Mercury in almost 33 years say they're rediscovering a "dynamic" planet brimming with features they've seen nowhere else in the solar system. The new images were captured Jan. 14 by NASA's Maryland-built Messenger spacecraft, which is being managed by scientists and engineers at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory near Laurel. One of the most puzzling images is that of a 25-mile-wide crater in the middle of Mercury's broad Caloris impact basin.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1996
Against strong opposition from Gov. Parris N. Glendening, business and labor leaders have been working quietly in Annapolis to win the legislature's go-ahead on a plan to pump dredge material into a deep area of the Chesapeake Bay known as the Deep Trough.The site was one of five initially proposed by the Maryland Port Administration for the unpopular task of disposing of mud and silt scooped out of the state's 126 miles of shipping channels.But shortly before the 1996 General Assembly convened last month, Governor Glendening ordered state officials to scrap Deep Trough as a disposal site.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | January 9, 2007
Allan Posner, in Owings Mills, noticed that our coldest average high temperatures occur around Jan. 17, and not at the winter solstice in December when days are shortest. "Why is the temperature trough centered on that date?" he asked. He guessed, correctly, that the oceans play a role. It takes time for heat stored in the air, land and water to dissipate as solar input diminishes. There is also a lag in reheating as days lengthen. So the hottest averages center on July 20 - a month after the summer solstice.
NEWS
March 20, 1996
THE BALTIMORE Sun's March 8 editorial, "Port treading water," did not convey the very serious economic and environmental implications of dumping two million cubic yards of dredge spoil a year in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay.The editorial refers to the deeper waters as the bay's "dead area." Ask any waterman who relies on this area to make a living and you'll see such a statement couldn't be farther from the truth.Roughly 50 percent of female blue crabs use waters deeper than 40 feet to migrate during the fall and winter to spawn at the mouth of the bay.Also, ask any sport fisherman who has been fishing in the deep waters and brought home a beautiful rockfish for a family meal and you'll see, once again, that your statement is way off the mark.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | January 9, 2007
Allan Posner, in Owings Mills, noticed that our coldest average high temperatures occur around Jan. 17, and not at the winter solstice in December when days are shortest. "Why is the temperature trough centered on that date?" he asked. He guessed, correctly, that the oceans play a role. It takes time for heat stored in the air, land and water to dissipate as solar input diminishes. There is also a lag in reheating as days lengthen. So the hottest averages center on July 20 - a month after the summer solstice.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 11, 1999
MIAMI -- Hurricane Floyd is expected to billow into a major storm this weekend as it cruises the Atlantic -- and turns sharply toward the Southeast, forecasters said yesterday.No land mass is likely to be endangered before early next week, but forecasters believe that Floyd is destined to strike the East Coast, possibly with winds in excess of 120 mph.They are advising coastal residents to prepare."Floridians should make good use of this weekend to review their hurricane plan in the event that Hurricane Floyd becomes a serious threat," said Max Mayfield, deputy director of the National Hurricane Center in west Miami-Dade.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1996
Glendening administration officials said yesterday that they would propose two options by this summer for an Upper Bay dredge disposal site, but they cautioned lawmakers that political opposition and regulatory hassles could delay such a facility up to 10 years, twice as long as lawmakers want.Nevertheless, members of a House committee warned yesterday that failure to move quickly on an Upper Bay facility, similar to Hart-Miller Island, could force the legislature to begin work on an environmentally controversial plan to pump clean dredge material into an area of the Chesapeake Bay known as the Deep Trough.
NEWS
March 8, 1996
JUST WHEN THINGS were looking rosy for the Port of Baltimore, a new set of ominous storm clouds can be seen on the horizon. Disputes over channel dredging and dramatic changes in the shipping industry foreshadow serious troubles.There's no question Baltimore will suffer unless the legislature approves a dredging program. But a late switch by Gov. Parris Glendening against a departmental plan for limited disposal in the "deep trough" of the Chesapeake Bay created confusion. Lawmakers are wondering if the governor is trying to curry favor with environmental groups at the port's expense.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2005
DICKERSON - The trip started in 21st-century Maryland, but there was this strange turn down Mouth of Monocacy Road in Montgomery County, across some railroad tracks and through a canopy of trees, into a clearing. What place is this? Scenes like this show up in European paintings, old ones mostly, not least because the Europeans built plenty of stone bridges similar to the Monocacy Aqueduct. Surrounded by woods and grassy embankments, the aqueduct spans the Monocacy River in a rhythm of seven pale stone arches, restored recently to look much as it did when coal, wheat and flour moved quietly along the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal at the pace of a walking mule.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2005
DICKERSON - The trip started in 21st-century Maryland, but there was this strange turn down Mouth of Monocacy Road in Montgomery County, across some railroad tracks and through a canopy of trees, into a clearing. What place is this? Scenes like this show up in European paintings, old ones mostly, not least because the Europeans built plenty of stone bridges similar to the Monocacy Aqueduct. Surrounded by woods and grassy embankments, the aqueduct spans the Monocacy River in a rhythm of seven pale stone arches, restored recently to look much as it did when coal, wheat and flour moved quietly along the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal at the pace of a walking mule.
NEWS
November 28, 2003
WHAT'S THAT SOUND in Annapolis? With the opening of the next General Assembly session just seven weeks away, it's hoofbeats -- of thirsty horses rushing to jockey for position at the trough. It now brims with all sorts of potential taxes, profits, contracts and deals that would result if the state legalizes slot machines. Possibly more than a billion dollars a year is in play, an unprecedented payoff that could be divvied up in endless ways. There's no end to the interests vying with each other -- with the happy aid of the Annapolis lobbying corps, for whom gambling serves as a rich employment act. "They just doubled my fee," one lobbyist matter-of-factly confided before the last meeting of the House's gambling task force this week.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | June 29, 2003
BOEING CO. is being quite finicky about where it builds its next airplane plant. Not just any place will do, and the company has a long list of necessaries, including a port, good flying weather, a skilled labor force and a lot of land. Oh yeah, and a big, fat welfare check from local taxpayers. Boeing denies that last part, of course. The corporate "site selection" charade includes the pretense that companies are not shaking down states and counties for "incentives" such as tax discounts, cheap loans, cash gifts, property grants and so forth.
NEWS
By Christopher T. Cross | June 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - With the success of The West Wing, it seems as though television has discovered national politics as a topic. Perhaps these programs are not as entertaining as some of the reality shows, but they often have interesting plots. Unfortunately, even the most vivid imagination of the best writers is no match for the reality of what actually happens in Congress. For example, an episode of the short-lived series Mr. Sterling, about a fictional senator from California who takes on the establishment, was based on a fight among several senators over $16 million to fund pet education programs - that being the only money available for senatorial pork-barrel projects.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2001
Claude Warner could do little to keep his cows out of a stream on his Lineboro farm until a government program helped him protect the tributary that empties into Pretty Boy Reservoir in neighboring Baltimore County. He built a bridge, fenced off the stream and buffered it with hundreds of trees. The cost to Warner? Not a single dollar - though the price tag was about $10,000. The cattle and grain farmer got a signing bonus when he enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2001
Claude Warner could do little to keep his cows out of a stream on his Lineboro farm until a government program helped him protect the tributary that empties into Pretty Boy Reservoir in neighboring Baltimore County. He built a bridge, fenced off the stream and buffered it with hundreds of trees. The cost to Warner? Not a single dollar - though the price tag was about $10,000. In fact, the cattle and grain farmer got a signing bonus when he enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2001
Claude Warner could do little to keep his cows out of a stream on his Lineboro farm until a government program helped him protect the tributary that empties into Pretty Boy Reservoir in neighboring Baltimore County. He built a bridge, fenced off the stream and buffered it with hundreds of trees. The cost to Warner? Not a single dollar - though the price tag was about $10,000. The cattle and grain farmer got a signing bonus when he enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2001
Claude Warner could do little to keep his cows out of a stream on his Lineboro farm until a government program helped him protect the tributary that empties into Pretty Boy Reservoir in neighboring Baltimore County. He built a bridge, fenced off the stream and buffered it with hundreds of trees. The cost to Warner? Not a single dollar - though the price tag was about $10,000. In fact, the cattle and grain farmer got a signing bonus when he enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP)
NEWS
September 27, 2000
YOU HAVE TO admire the in-your-face nerve of it all. State Sen. Thomas Bromwell's breathtaking grab for the gold stands amid the most audacious high-level patronage of recent times. The one-time bar owner now enters the Pantheon of political self-dealers. He'll be riding around in a car financed by a $30,000 allowance that comes with his new salary of $150,000. To make the situation even more breathtaking, he'll be managing a $1 billion insurance business -- a job for which he has almost no qualification or experience.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.