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NEWS
July 7, 2013
Manny Machado has had a great season so far with the Baltimore Orioles. Not only is he a talented player but his youth gives him a glow of happiness that every parent wants to see in their child as they experience their dream come true. Now, however, The Sun's staff is suggesting that to celebrate his 21 s t birthday on Saturday, he starts out in the morning drinking, and continues on with gambling, and tops off the day at a strip joint ("10 ways Manny Machado can celebrate his 21st birthday in Baltimore," July 5)
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 4, 2014
That's a wise move by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Tony Batts, asking the feds to open a civil rights investigation into police brutality and how cases are handled here. But I have a question: She took office in February 2010; didn't the mayor recognize a troubling trend in settlements and court judgments before she read about them in this newspaper? It's a tough job, running the city; it's hard to keep track of everything. But, as a member of the Board of Estimates since 2007 - first as City Council president, then as mayor - didn't Rawlings-Blake notice damages going to victims of beatings and other appalling police actions?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 24, 2011
What is it with presidents and getting locked out of places?  President Barack Obama found himself locked out of the White House yesterday, but Obama cooly played it off, entering through another door. He's so calm he even appears to be whistling. And that's important, because, when you're the president, your every waking move is likely to be recorded.      A similar situation happened to President George W. Bush in 2005, but when it happened to Bush, it was much, much funnier.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Just seven days ago, Baltimore's sports fans, the faithful clad in orange and purple, were brimming with optimism. The Ravens were set to open what they hoped would be a bounce-back season with star running back Ray Rice due to return at the end of the week from a two-game suspension for a domestic violence incident - a penalty roundly criticized as too light. The Orioles, meanwhile, were rolling toward a division title, leading their nearest rivals by a margin they hadn't enjoyed in decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
There's an unexpected case of theatrical synergy going on in the region, with two productions that look squarely at issues of race, identity and self-esteem. At Everyman Theatre , you'll find a potent staging of Lorraine Hansberry's "A Raisin in the Sun," which became in 1959 the first work by an African-American woman to reach Broadway. At Arena Stage , there's an absorbing revival of "Trouble in Mind," a play by Alice Childress that almost became the first work by an African-American woman to reach Broadway.
NEWS
April 28, 2010
Steelers days numbered Ken Murray Baltimore Sun It would make a wonderful feel-good story if Ben Roethlisberger were to divorce himself from his unsavory past and find deliverance in his football future. I hope that happens. But I stopped believing in the tooth fairy a long time ago. It's obvious Roethlisberger needs help. If you read his statement about the NFL's suspension, you had to be disappointed. He was sorry for his teammates, the Steelers' fan base and himself.
SPORTS
By Bill Lyon and Bill Lyon,Knight-Ridder | December 23, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Trouble is never hard to find. But there are some places where it's a little easier to locate than others.And one of those places is in a lot where people park their cars while they frequent a saloon.Trouble doesn't exactly punch a time clock, but 2:30 in the morning figures to be prime time. Sunday morning coming down, as the balladeer once wrote.Well, friend, the Philadelphia 76ers have got trouble with a capital T, trouble right there in Barkleyville. Charles Barkley, lightning rod, has caught another bolt.
NEWS
By GLENN SMALL | May 22, 1994
I watched John Frederick Thanos die last week.He went quietly, without a last-second outburst or change of heart. He looked toward the ceiling, his eyes fluttered, his mouth dropped open, and he was asleep. Death took him moments later.As a criminal, John Thanos achieved more fame than he ever could have as a law-abiding citizen -- something he never was. From the age of 12, until his death at 45, Thanos was never far from trouble -- most, if not all of it, of his own making.His crimes were brutal -- he executed three teen-agers with a sawed-off .22 caliber semi-automatic rifle which he carried around Maryland in a leather doctor's bag. He calmly confessed to his crimes while smoking a cigarette, and while complaining that police failed to kill him."
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | June 24, 2004
MAYBE I shouldn't want to do my dance: a simple two-step from side to side. The groove, the melody is so infectious. But when I listen past that and concentrate on the lyrics, the dance impulse melts away. And I'm thinking, "Sad stuff like this happens every day." I'm talking about Trouble, the impressive debut by Akon, a Senegal-born singer-songwriter whose music won't neatly fit into anybody's box. The songs are well-crafted, rippling with African rhythms. Hip-hop informs the overall attitude and beats.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | November 8, 2007
I can't believe this guy. Wouldn't you think that Cincinnati Bengals receiver Chris Henry would be doing everything within his power to stay out of trouble, now that his eight-game suspension is over? Wouldn't you think he would be listed in the program as Choir Boy? Wouldn't you think he would avoid trouble at any cost, even if it means being a shut-in? Not Henry. Reports have surfaced that he allegedly was involved in an altercation with a parking attendant Tuesday, the night before he was allowed to rejoin the Bengals.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
An Eastern Shore teacher was put on leave and taken for medical evaluation after authorities grew concerned about his writings - including a novel about a school shooting and a letter with "suicidal undertones" - and a model he constructed at his home of a school building. But with authorities initially supplying few details, the case of 24-year-old Patrick Wayne McLaw blew up online. Commentators from across the political spectrum worried that his rights were being trampled by an overreaching government that was policing the teacher's thoughts rather than his actions.
HEALTH
By John Fritze and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Federal auditors looking into Maryland's flawed health insurance exchange are subpoenaing documents as part of their probe and have sought information from the lead contractor hired by the state to build the site. North Dakota-based Noridian Healthcare Solutions, the former prime contractor with a multimillion-dollar deal to design Maryland's online insurance marketplace, received a request for documents related to the project from the inspector general of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on July 30, the company's president said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Nearly three-quarters of a million Marylanders are expected to hit the roads and airways this Labor Day weekend even as the state struggles with congestion at its largest airport, on its most-traveled highway and around some of its largest tourist attractions. About 728,000 people in the state are expected to travel 50 miles or more between Thursday and Monday, the third-highest number on record for Labor Day in Maryland, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic, which is set to release its predictions Tuesday.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Relatives of a 10-year-old disabled foster child who died at an Anne Arundel County group home last month and the guardian of another resident whose inadequate care there led to a serious illness have filed notice that they intend to sue the state for failing to supervise the facility's operator. An attorney for the two former residents of LifeLine Inc.'s Laurel-area group home said he sent a formal notice to the state treasurer's office that he intends to seek monetary damages for each incident - the details of which were highlighted in a Baltimore Sun investigation of the company.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Charles Gorham heard loud music at 5 a.m. Friday from the tan stucco garage apartment he rented behind his Northwest Baltimore home. His tenant, Duane Mitchell, was known for partying, and Gorham figured to leave well enough alone. He left for work, but when he returned at 9 a.m., the music was still blasting. The 73-year-old landlord walked over and, in the doorway, saw Mitchell's thin body splayed out, face buried in dingy beige carpet, dried blood covering the back of his bald head.
NEWS
August 3, 2014
Rather than running constant articles about the Baltimore Ravens and their - um - misadventures ("Ray Rice apologizes to wife and all domestic violence victims in first comments since suspension," July 31), why not file a feel-good story on how many Orioles fans are in attendance at games as far away as California? Pam Prenger, Towson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | August 7, 1997
For those scoring at home, Bam Morris flunked his drug/alcohol test in January, lost his appeal in March and didn't see the news in the papers until August.It would qualify as an amazing feat except that the Ravens are part of the NFL, a tightly knit collective well-versed in the art of dealing disinformation. Surely you haven't forgotten the great expansion sham.Anyway, the Ravens obviously wanted to squelch the news about Morris for as long as possible, fearful of the impact of negative headlines at a time when they were coming off a 4-12 season and selling season tickets to fewer customers than a year ago.They need not have worried.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 30, 1995
"Trouble?" asks Stuart Alison's secretary, sounding genuinely surprised. "In court?"Yes, trouble, she's told. She's being asked about these two criminal convictions in Harford County District Court last week, where Alison, the bizarre Bel Air attorney, was found guilty of harassing a fellow attorney and, just for good measure, of jacklighting deer while carrying a weapon.Jacklighting deer means shining a light in the animals' eyes, to freeze them with fear, thus making it easier to shoot them.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
A troubled Reservoir Hill property that came to be known as "Murder Mall" will be demolished under an agreement that's left some residents relieved but others worried about where they'll go. Baltimore Housing officials have been trying for at least four years to oust the company that owns Madison Park North Apartments and move the residents out, but the owner brought several challenges in court. The two sides finally reached a settlement last month. Residents say they've been told they have four months to find places to live, and city officials said the 202-unit complex would be razed 10 months after the last tenant leaves.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
If all went as planned, Gov. Martin O'Malley spent this past weekend in Iowa, his second trip to the state in a month, which puts him about two visits ahead of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton this year. His purpose is hardly a secret as he's considered a likely Democratic candidate, albeit a relatively unknown one, for a 2016 presidential run. Conventional wisdom is that candidates in Iowa say nice things about agriculture. One of the big controversies involving this year's race for a U.S. Senate seat from the Hawkeye state, for instance, was whether the Democratic candidate, Rep. Bruce Braley, threatened a lawsuit when some of his neighbor's organically-raised chickens wandered into his yard.
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