Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTropical Meteorology Project
IN THE NEWS

Tropical Meteorology Project

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 24, 2012
Forecasters are expecting the fewest Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms since 2009, particularly if the weather phenomenon El Niño develops by the heart of the hurricane season. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is predicting nine to 15 named storms, down from 19 named storms during each of the past two hurricane seasons. That is consistent with recent predictions from other hurricane forecasters, calling for about 10 to 12 named storms. Despite an early start to the hurricane seasons in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, there is no indication of a third consecutive active hurricane season, meteorologists said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
A developing El Nino is forecast to suppress tropical storms and hurricanes this summer and fall, contributing to a below-normal storm season, U.S. forecasters said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts eight to 13 tropical storms will develop in the Atlantic this year, three to six of which will become hurricanes. One or two of those could intensify into what are considered "major" hurricanes. Forecasters urged preparation despite the predictions of a below-average season, citing seasons like 1992, which came at the tail end of an El Nino and brought devastation to Florida with Hurricane Andrew.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 9, 2012
The last four months of hurricane season could be busy ones in the Atlantic Ocean, with government forecasters raising their expectations to an 85 percent chance of a normal or above-normal season. The Atlantic could be in for three to six hurricanes, two or three of them major hurricanes, through November, according to an updated forecast the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released Thursday. Major hurricanes rank 3, 4 or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
A relatively quiet hurricane season is nearing its end, likely to be the first since 1994 without a major hurricane forming in the Atlantic, according to researchers at Colorado State University. The season saw 13 named storms, which is about average. But storms rarely strengthened much, with just two reaching hurricane status despite predictions of a more active season. “It was one of the largest busts for our research team in the 30 years we've been issuing this report,” researcher Phil Klotzbach said in a statement.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
A relatively quiet hurricane season is nearing its end, likely to be the first since 1994 without a major hurricane forming in the Atlantic, according to researchers at Colorado State University. The season saw 13 named storms, which is about average. But storms rarely strengthened much, with just two reaching hurricane status despite predictions of a more active season. “It was one of the largest busts for our research team in the 30 years we've been issuing this report,” researcher Phil Klotzbach said in a statement.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
An early 2013 hurricane season forecast is calling for a busy summer and fall, with a nearly 50 percent chance of a major storm striking the U.S. East Coast. Forecasters at Colorado State University on Wednesday predicted 18 named storms would form in the Atlantic Ocean, about six more than normal. That would be one fewer than in 2012, though. They expect nine of those storms to become hurricanes, and four of those hurricanes to reach "major" storm status. The forecast paints a picture of a chaotic storm season, with storm strength and frequency expected to be well above normal.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Despite being one of the most active on record, the 2012 hurricane season lacked power -- Superstorm Sandy notwithstanding  -- making it a "highly unusual year", according to one storm forecaster. The season officially ends Friday, and some forecasters suspect a post-season cyclone could be possible, though it would be unlikely to affect land. But assuming that doesn't happen, the 2012 season ranks third among the most active since record-keeping began in 1851 with 19 named storms.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Tropical Storm Chantal is churning through the Lesser Antilles islands and possibly heading toward the East Coast, a path that is more common in the heart of hurricane season than in early July. Not only that, but the storm is a bit "early" to begin with: The third named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season comes, on average, around Aug. 13. As of Tuesday morning, Chantal was about 85 miles east of St. Lucia with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph. The National Hurricane Center's forecast cone takes it across Hispaniola, through the Bahamas and a few hundred miles east of Florida's Atlantic coast by next weekend.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Sandy is the 77th name to be retired from the World Meteorological Organization's Atlantic hurricane season lists, joining memorable storms to hit Maryland like Irene, Isabel, Gloria and Agnes. Sara will replace it on a list that will next come into use in 2018. The WMO maintains six sets of lists that it rotates through. The organization chooses to change the names on the lists only when a storm is so deadly or costly that reusing its name would be inappropriate or insensitive, according to the National Hurricane Center.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
A developing El Nino is forecast to suppress tropical storms and hurricanes this summer and fall, contributing to a below-normal storm season, U.S. forecasters said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts eight to 13 tropical storms will develop in the Atlantic this year, three to six of which will become hurricanes. One or two of those could intensify into what are considered "major" hurricanes. Forecasters urged preparation despite the predictions of a below-average season, citing seasons like 1992, which came at the tail end of an El Nino and brought devastation to Florida with Hurricane Andrew.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Tropical Storm Chantal is churning through the Lesser Antilles islands and possibly heading toward the East Coast, a path that is more common in the heart of hurricane season than in early July. Not only that, but the storm is a bit "early" to begin with: The third named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season comes, on average, around Aug. 13. As of Tuesday morning, Chantal was about 85 miles east of St. Lucia with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph. The National Hurricane Center's forecast cone takes it across Hispaniola, through the Bahamas and a few hundred miles east of Florida's Atlantic coast by next weekend.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Sandy is the 77th name to be retired from the World Meteorological Organization's Atlantic hurricane season lists, joining memorable storms to hit Maryland like Irene, Isabel, Gloria and Agnes. Sara will replace it on a list that will next come into use in 2018. The WMO maintains six sets of lists that it rotates through. The organization chooses to change the names on the lists only when a storm is so deadly or costly that reusing its name would be inappropriate or insensitive, according to the National Hurricane Center.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
An early 2013 hurricane season forecast is calling for a busy summer and fall, with a nearly 50 percent chance of a major storm striking the U.S. East Coast. Forecasters at Colorado State University on Wednesday predicted 18 named storms would form in the Atlantic Ocean, about six more than normal. That would be one fewer than in 2012, though. They expect nine of those storms to become hurricanes, and four of those hurricanes to reach "major" storm status. The forecast paints a picture of a chaotic storm season, with storm strength and frequency expected to be well above normal.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Despite being one of the most active on record, the 2012 hurricane season lacked power -- Superstorm Sandy notwithstanding  -- making it a "highly unusual year", according to one storm forecaster. The season officially ends Friday, and some forecasters suspect a post-season cyclone could be possible, though it would be unlikely to affect land. But assuming that doesn't happen, the 2012 season ranks third among the most active since record-keeping began in 1851 with 19 named storms.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 9, 2012
The last four months of hurricane season could be busy ones in the Atlantic Ocean, with government forecasters raising their expectations to an 85 percent chance of a normal or above-normal season. The Atlantic could be in for three to six hurricanes, two or three of them major hurricanes, through November, according to an updated forecast the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released Thursday. Major hurricanes rank 3, 4 or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 24, 2012
Forecasters are expecting the fewest Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms since 2009, particularly if the weather phenomenon El Niño develops by the heart of the hurricane season. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is predicting nine to 15 named storms, down from 19 named storms during each of the past two hurricane seasons. That is consistent with recent predictions from other hurricane forecasters, calling for about 10 to 12 named storms. Despite an early start to the hurricane seasons in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, there is no indication of a third consecutive active hurricane season, meteorologists said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 15, 2012
Hurricane season is off to an early start in the Pacific, but not quite yet in the Atlantic. The season's first tropical depression has formed in the Eastern Pacific, about 645 miles from the Mexican coast. A low pressure system in the Eastern Atlantic, meanwhile, is unlikely to become Subtropical Storm Alberto, according to the National Hurricane Center. The formal hurricane season doesn't start for another two weeks. Look out for an article soon on the hurricane season outlook.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | April 4, 2012
Hurricane forecasters at Colorado State University are calling for a below-average hurricane season this year, with 10 expected named storms and about a one in four chance a major hurricane will hit the East Coast. The Tropical Meteorology Project released its main forecast for the year Wednesday, in advance of the June 1 start to the Atlantic hurricane season. In a typical year, the East Coast stands a 31 percent chance of being struck by a major hurricane. The median number of named storms over the past century is 12. The project's meteorologists wrote that unusually cool waters in the Atlantic and the potential for a developing El Nino global weather pattern contributed to the forecast.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.