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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
Stephen Joseph Reimer, who achieved his dream of owning a tropical fish store after years of working as a data processor for a bank, died of a heart attack Tuesday at Franklin Square Hospital. He was 53 and lived in Perry Hall.In 1991, he gained ownership of the House of Tropicals II on Belair Road in Fullerton and it soon became one of the largest fish stores in Baltimore County, with more than 500 tanks of species."That was always what he wanted to do after he retired, was to open a store.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
Maryland pet store operators and at least one admitted snakehead owner criticized a state-proposed ban on possessing the invasive fish yesterday, saying the regulation is too broad and would force responsible people to part with pets they've raised and nurtured. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is seeking to ban possession of 29 kinds of snakeheads, most of them tropical fish that are unlikely to survive in Maryland waterways. The most troublesome of the species has been the northern snakehead, a fish that can breathe air, survive on land for about three days and thrive in cooler climates.
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FEATURES
By Jennifer Lehman and Jennifer Lehman,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
In the tanks that line the walls of Exotic Aquatics in Parkville's North Plaza Mall, there are plenty of aggressive, even scary fish swimming about: betta fish, or Siamese fighting fish, piranhas and stingrays. But the scariest of the bunch, according to some people, is a little inch-long, red-striped fish that has shown up in pet stores and aquarium shops across the country in the past month: a tiny, genetically altered tropical fish being marketed as the GloFish. Developed in Singapore for use in environmental research, the GloFish is the first genetically engineered pet to exude vibrant color under a black light.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Lehman and Jennifer Lehman,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
In the tanks that line the walls of Exotic Aquatics in Parkville's North Plaza Mall, there are plenty of aggressive, even scary fish swimming about: betta fish, or Siamese fighting fish, piranhas and stingrays. But the scariest of the bunch, according to some people, is a little inch-long, red-striped fish that has shown up in pet stores and aquarium shops across the country in the past month: a tiny, genetically altered tropical fish being marketed as the GloFish. Developed in Singapore for use in environmental research, the GloFish is the first genetically engineered pet to exude vibrant color under a black light.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | March 13, 1993
Jim Skinner was about 12 years old when he got his first fis tank."It was a community tank -- I had a little bit of everything in it," says Mr. Skinner, now 39. He got hooked."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 17, 1992
The tanks in Maryland's oldest aquarium shop have held everything from electric eels to Prohibition bathtub gin.Drop into Acme Tropical Gardens at 21st and St. Paul streets in the southern tier of Charles Village. The shop is a self-contained world of chugging pumps, bubbling air hoses and choirs of angel fish. The place looks like something out of a 1930s Hollywood studio. Even its windows appear to be coated with green algae.Presiding over the operation is Bernard Dappie, 39, a rather shy man with long red hair who first remembers pressing his nose to the glass of an aquarium at this shop when he was 14 years old."
BUSINESS
By Laurie Squire and Laurie Squire,NEWSDAY | January 25, 2004
The shopper: Paul Sieswerda, curator of the New York Aquarium at Coney Island. The product: Tropical fish. What he wants: "The same thing anybody else wants when shopping for a pet. I want to go to a reputable pet store where I am reasonably certain I'll find healthy, disease-free animals. I look for a fish that plays well with others - one who views his tank-mates as friends, not food. I like fish that have beauty, a personality, an interesting behavior (hmm, sounds like a reality show contestant)
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
Maryland pet store operators and at least one admitted snakehead owner criticized a state-proposed ban on possessing the invasive fish yesterday, saying the regulation is too broad and would force responsible people to part with pets they've raised and nurtured. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is seeking to ban possession of 29 kinds of snakeheads, most of them tropical fish that are unlikely to survive in Maryland waterways. The most troublesome of the species has been the northern snakehead, a fish that can breathe air, survive on land for about three days and thrive in cooler climates.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | January 7, 1991
Cathy Gardner had sold enough homes in Crofton to know what was wrong with the place.Not one pet store in the West County community specialized in tropical fish.The real estate agent believed Crofton needed a fish store. So she decided to open one herself.But starting a small business can be overwhelming -- even for someone with as much experience as Gardner. She'd run a successful Pasadena pet store in the early 1980s, eventually moving up to wholesaling, buying a warehouse and supplying petsto stores in seven states.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | January 17, 1992
Mike Royko is on vacation. In his absence, we are reprinting some of his favorite columns. This one was originally published in 1980.A WOMAN STROLLING through Chicago's Grant Park on a recent Sunday was horrified to see two men stalking pigeons.One man would throw some bread crumbs on the ground to lure the pigeons to him.When the pigeons gathered, the other man would sneak up on them and slam a long-handled fishing net over one or two of them. Then he would stuff them into a canvas sack.
BUSINESS
By Laurie Squire and Laurie Squire,NEWSDAY | January 25, 2004
The shopper: Paul Sieswerda, curator of the New York Aquarium at Coney Island. The product: Tropical fish. What he wants: "The same thing anybody else wants when shopping for a pet. I want to go to a reputable pet store where I am reasonably certain I'll find healthy, disease-free animals. I look for a fish that plays well with others - one who views his tank-mates as friends, not food. I like fish that have beauty, a personality, an interesting behavior (hmm, sounds like a reality show contestant)
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
Merrill Cohen, a pioneer in the tropical fish industry and a dog breeding expert, died of lung cancer Wednesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Pikesville resident was 75. Mr. Cohen pursued myriad interests with a passion that enabled him to excel quickly in music, education, business, and tropical fish and dog breeding. "Merrill was a gifted and talented intellect in the renaissance mode," said Philip Sherman, his lifelong friend and attorney. "A man of extraordinary abilities and a rare combination of talent."
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
Stephen Joseph Reimer, who achieved his dream of owning a tropical fish store after years of working as a data processor for a bank, died of a heart attack Tuesday at Franklin Square Hospital. He was 53 and lived in Perry Hall.In 1991, he gained ownership of the House of Tropicals II on Belair Road in Fullerton and it soon became one of the largest fish stores in Baltimore County, with more than 500 tanks of species."That was always what he wanted to do after he retired, was to open a store.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | March 13, 1993
Jim Skinner was about 12 years old when he got his first fis tank."It was a community tank -- I had a little bit of everything in it," says Mr. Skinner, now 39. He got hooked."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 17, 1992
The tanks in Maryland's oldest aquarium shop have held everything from electric eels to Prohibition bathtub gin.Drop into Acme Tropical Gardens at 21st and St. Paul streets in the southern tier of Charles Village. The shop is a self-contained world of chugging pumps, bubbling air hoses and choirs of angel fish. The place looks like something out of a 1930s Hollywood studio. Even its windows appear to be coated with green algae.Presiding over the operation is Bernard Dappie, 39, a rather shy man with long red hair who first remembers pressing his nose to the glass of an aquarium at this shop when he was 14 years old."
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | January 17, 1992
Mike Royko is on vacation. In his absence, we are reprinting some of his favorite columns. This one was originally published in 1980.A WOMAN STROLLING through Chicago's Grant Park on a recent Sunday was horrified to see two men stalking pigeons.One man would throw some bread crumbs on the ground to lure the pigeons to him.When the pigeons gathered, the other man would sneak up on them and slam a long-handled fishing net over one or two of them. Then he would stuff them into a canvas sack.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1991
William C. Anderson had worked hard for 30 years and figured he would have no trouble finding work when he sold his tropical fish store last December for legal reasons.Eleven months and 100 job applications later, he has gone through his savings and 20 weeks of unemployment benefits. His only "income" is $111 a month in food stamps. He has filed for personal bankruptcy and expects to lose his home to foreclosure within months."You work your whole life and, for what? It's going to be all gone," said Anderson, sitting in his Middle River home.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 10, 1991
THERE IS probably something good to be said about the idea of fish as pets, although whatever it is escapes me at the moment.Certainly, fish are neither as playful and affectionate as dogs, nor do they possess the titillating menace of cats, who will often lunge at a person's thorax or scratch out his eyes simply out of boredom.Fish are also not exactly the hardiest creatures around. Quite frankly, the ones I have known as pets have all tended to . . . well, I guess there's no other way to put this . . . die.You have no idea how upsetting it is to retire for the evening after tossing a cheerful wave in the direction of the aquarium, where your fish are swimming peacefully -- only to come downstairs the next morning and find them floating belly-up next to the fake coral which sits atop the fake miniature sunken ship.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1991
William C. Anderson had worked hard for 30 years and figured he would have no trouble finding work when he sold his tropical fish store last December for legal reasons.Eleven months and 100 job applications later, he has gone through his savings and 20 weeks of unemployment benefits. His only "income" is $111 a month in food stamps. He has filed for personal bankruptcy and expects to lose his home to foreclosure within months."You work your whole life and, for what? It's going to be all gone," said Anderson, sitting in his Middle River home.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 10, 1991
THERE IS probably something good to be said about the idea of fish as pets, although whatever it is escapes me at the moment.Certainly, fish are neither as playful and affectionate as dogs, nor do they possess the titillating menace of cats, who will often lunge at a person's thorax or scratch out his eyes simply out of boredom.Fish are also not exactly the hardiest creatures around. Quite frankly, the ones I have known as pets have all tended to . . . well, I guess there's no other way to put this . . . die.You have no idea how upsetting it is to retire for the evening after tossing a cheerful wave in the direction of the aquarium, where your fish are swimming peacefully -- only to come downstairs the next morning and find them floating belly-up next to the fake coral which sits atop the fake miniature sunken ship.
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