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Troops To Bosnia

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NEWS
December 13, 1995
PRESIDENT CLINTON flies to Paris tonight to put the full majesty of his office behind a peace-enforcement treaty for Bosnia that divides the American people and has scant congressional approval for its precise terms. He has, in our view, full constitutional authority to send 20,000 U.S. troops to Bosnia. rTC But we continue to doubt the wisdom or viability of an agreement that G.I.s, at great peril, are expected to uphold.There are no heroes in this crisis. Mr. Clinton flipped and flopped in trying to avoid a conflict in which U.S. vital interests (contrary to his latest comments)
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Although U.S. troops are scheduled to leave Bosnia at the end of this year, officials say the Clinton administration is keeping open the option of participating in a subsequent military force to maintain stability in the strife-riven Balkan nation.U.S. and European officials will begin to discuss the options seriously after the first postwar Bosnian national elections are held Sept. 14."The question of a follow-on force will be addressed once the election results are in," a senior administration official said this week.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Reflecting a debate about the use of U.S. forces in regional conflicts, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is questioning even the most limited forms of military intervention to protect the Muslims in Bosnia and Herzegovina or to try to stop the fighting.In a lengthy and sometimes emotional interview, the chairman, Gen. Colin L. Powell, offered a strong defense of his philosophy that military force is best used to achieve a decisive victory and for the first time publicly explained his reluctance to intervene in Bosnia.
NEWS
December 24, 1995
How we spend on schools, not how much, is keyAs our county school board and delegation debate policy and budgetary decisions, they should consider the following: Since 1960, real expenditures per student have more than tripled, teacher/pupil ratio has dropped more than 30 percent, and average SAT scores have fallen more than 50 points. The answer to the politicians' dilemma lies not in how much money we spend, but in how we spend it.Just as we, as consumers, cannot tell the neighborhood store what to sell, we can indirectly control what that store carries through voluntary exchanges with it and other stores.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is making preliminary plans for deploying up to 20,000 U.S. ground troops to help with U.N. peacekeeping efforts in the Bosnia if talks in Geneva produce a peace accord to end the bitter conflict, say U.S. officials.But President Clinton said no final decision will be made on the precise number of troops and how they will be deployed until he is certain that any peace agreement is "fair, fully embraced by the Bosnian government, and is enforceable."
NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE | December 11, 1994
Angering the Europeans and splitting NATO, U.S. policy in the former Yugoslavia was -- until last week -- nothing if not decisive in one respect: The crisis did not justify risking the lives of American combat troops on the ground there.It took the prospect of a military debacle during the evacuation of 23,000 United Nations peacekeepers and nothing less than the threatened collapse of the trans-Atlantic alliance to reverse the administration's adamant refusal to put U.S. ground forces into the desperately dangerous situation.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Although U.S. troops are scheduled to leave Bosnia at the end of this year, officials say the Clinton administration is keeping open the option of participating in a subsequent military force to maintain stability in the strife-riven Balkan nation.U.S. and European officials will begin to discuss the options seriously after the first postwar Bosnian national elections are held Sept. 14."The question of a follow-on force will be addressed once the election results are in," a senior administration official said this week.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, confronting Congress on key foreign policy issues, asserted yesterday the need for American global leadership, condemned "the forces of isolation" and called for support for sending U.S. troops to Bosnia.The president -- in what was billed as a major foreign policy address -- also denounced Republican-led efforts on Capitol Hill to "gut" foreign assistance, "hack" the State Department's budget, "slash" arms control spending and "shirk" United Nations obligations.
NEWS
September 1, 1993
Some 60 Spanish U.N. troops held hostage in besiegedMOSTAR for five days were released by their civilian captors, who said they feared a Croat attack. In exchange, three new Spanish armored personnel carriers arrived to reassure the civilians.Bosnia's Muslim and Serb leaders agreed in GENEVA on a new cease-fire and prisoner exchange but remained far apart on a proposed ethnic map for Bosnia. However, Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic predicted that all three factions will sign an overall peace settlement today.
NEWS
December 3, 1995
The pros and cons of troops in BosniaThe only decision worse than sending peace-keeping troops to Bosnia would be not sending them. The consequences of our failure to do so would be unthinkable. It would be better if no nation invaded another, if naked military aggression, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity were not committed and, when these atrocities did occur, it would have been better if Europe had forcefully stepped in and stopped them.But that's history. There is only one superpower and only one democracy with the moral power to stop the killing of innocent women and children in Bosnia.
NEWS
December 13, 1995
PRESIDENT CLINTON flies to Paris tonight to put the full majesty of his office behind a peace-enforcement treaty for Bosnia that divides the American people and has scant congressional approval for its precise terms. He has, in our view, full constitutional authority to send 20,000 U.S. troops to Bosnia. rTC But we continue to doubt the wisdom or viability of an agreement that G.I.s, at great peril, are expected to uphold.There are no heroes in this crisis. Mr. Clinton flipped and flopped in trying to avoid a conflict in which U.S. vital interests (contrary to his latest comments)
NEWS
December 8, 1995
Clinton deserves support on BosniaThe hysterical sarcasm spumed by the popular guru of conservative talk shows following President Clinton's address on Bosnia was not surprising or unusual. The accusations that the president is motivated by political gain just aren't logical. If it were true, Mr. Clinton would not be putting his re-election on the line by going against the majority of the American people who don't favor sending troops to Bosnia.We have to trust that this formidable decision has not been taken lightly but supported by facts.
NEWS
December 3, 1995
The pros and cons of troops in BosniaThe only decision worse than sending peace-keeping troops to Bosnia would be not sending them. The consequences of our failure to do so would be unthinkable. It would be better if no nation invaded another, if naked military aggression, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity were not committed and, when these atrocities did occur, it would have been better if Europe had forcefully stepped in and stopped them.But that's history. There is only one superpower and only one democracy with the moral power to stop the killing of innocent women and children in Bosnia.
NEWS
December 2, 1995
Why sending troops to Bosnia is rightOf course the U.S. must send troops to Bosnia.Purported leaders in Congress demand guarantees of safety, ''reasonable'' assurances of success and ask how the peace of Bosnia relates to our national interest.Considering the Republican Congress' narrow-minded and mean-spirited definition of self-interest, it's not surprising that they miss the point: This is bigger than national interest.Going to Bosnia is in our human interest, part of our duty as members of the global community, to help others secure peace and an end to inhumanity.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's statement that American troops will probably stay in Bosnia for no more than about a year is based on an unrealistic scenario for stabilizing an explosive nation stocked with weapons, some analysts say.The Clinton administration says it expects that within 12 months after the NATO peace-implementation plan begins, the combatants will have been separated, territory transferred, free elections held and military strength roughly...
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULIUS WITCOVER | December 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After a campaign appearance in New Hampshire way back last January, Bob Dole was asked why he didn't spend more time attacking President Clinton. The problem, Mr. Dole replied with some asperity, is that as the Senate majority leader he must deal with the president and not just ''run around the country shooting off my mouth.''There was no question at the time that Mr. Dole was talking about Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas, the rival for the presidential nomination who has been most successful in getting under his skin.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Mark Matthews and Richard H. P. Sia and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | October 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The slaying of 15 U.S. soldiers in Somalia last week has forced the Clinton administration to rethink -- but not abandon -- its support for peacekeeping missions to other global hot spots.A mission already under way to violence-ridden Haiti will be beefed up. Another to Liberia may be scrapped all together. The biggest mission on the drawing board -- sending 25,000 troops to Bosnia -- could be jeopardized unless President Clinton can sell it to a wary American public.But the administration is far from ready to give up on peacekeeping as a key element of its post-Cold War foreign policy, and officials hope to use the costly lessons of Somalia to put peacekeeping on a sounder footing.
NEWS
August 31, 1993
Where is Congress as the Clinton administration steadily increases U.S. involvement in Somalia and Bosnia, sometimes putting American troops under foreign command as the United Nations expands its authority? No formal hearings have been held, no authorizing resolutions voted upon. The legislative branch that rang with furious debate over the Persian Gulf conflict has gone silent, a sign of its befuddlement in the post-Cold War era.The central U.S. objective in the Somalia operation has switched from humanitarian to security objectives (now with comical results)
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Judy Silas, a middle school principal in Jacksonville, Fla., listened Monday night as President Clinton argued his case for sending U.S. troops to Bosnia. But she heard something else. Something familiar. Something she said she heard three decades ago when her brother -- and some of the high school seniors she taught -- were sent off to war."I heard Clinton use the same arguments I heard when we were going into Vietnam," says Ms. Silas, who opposes the involvement of U.S. ground troops in the Bosnian peace effort.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The absence of a clearly spelled-out "exit strategy" emerged yesterday as a major impediment in President Clinton's campaign to win congressional support for sending American soldiers into Bosnia.In his televised speech to the nation Monday night, Mr. Clinton said the troops would oversee the separation of the warring armies and "create a secure environment," staying for about a year.But the administration isn't totally confident itself about this scenario. In fact, U.S. officials refuse to rule out the possibility of aborting the mission if one or more Bosnian parties opposes it, extending it beyond one year or eventually replacing the U.S.-NATO force with European peacekeepers.
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