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By Ken Murray | January 29, 1991
TAMPA, Fla. -- Next stop for Super Bowl XXV MVP Ottis Anderson: Saudi Arabia -- if security arrangements can be worked out.The veteran New York Giants running back said yesterday that he wants to visit the U.S. troops in Saudi Arabia to show his appreciation for their war effort."
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NEWS
May 4, 2003
THE OVERTHROW of Saddam Hussein hasn't changed a single boundary in the Middle East, but it has completely redrawn the map. Days after Baghdad fell, the United States said it was pulling almost all its troops out of Saudi Arabia -- and this is the first solid evidence of a fundamental reordering throughout the region, one that began before Sept. 11 but that only victory in Iraq could make possible. Its effects will be felt in Syria, Iran, Israel and farther afield, but Saudi Arabia is in some ways the epicenter -- the place where the politics of oil and the politics of terrorism intersected.
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NEWS
March 3, 1991
While U.S. troops left loved ones at home here in the county and elsewhere while serving in the Persian Gulf war, many Harford residents did not forget them. They organized efforts to show their support forthose called to duty. The efforts involved pride, hard work and spanned a wide segment of the Harford community -- from young school children who worked packing squeeze bottles at Aberdeen Proving Ground tobe sent to troops in Saudi Arabia to seniors in a Bel Air nursing home who made baskets, decorated with yellow bows and the Grand Old Flag, for the troops.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2003
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - Saudi Arabia, one of the United States' strongest allies in the Middle East, said yesterday that it would take no part in an American-led invasion of "brotherly Iraq" and warned against a breakup of the country in the wake of a war. As if to punctuate the reasons for that position, an explosion ripped through a house in the capital earlier yesterday, killing a man who was apparently building a bomb. The government is investigating any possible link to al-Qaida. Reading a statement on state television yesterday evening in the name of King Fahd, who is incapacitated, Crown Prince Abdullah, the country's de facto ruler, said, "The kingdom will not participate in any way in the war" against Iraq, adding that Saudi Arabia's armed forces would not enter Iraqi territory.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 6, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Linking U.S. policy in the Persian Gulf to the politically volatile issue of a tax increase, powerful Democratic voices in Congress are raising the possibility of a surcharge to finance the enormous cost of the military expedition.Rep. Dan Rostenkowski, D-Ill., chairman of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, endorsed the idea of the levy yesterday, following the lead of the Democratic chairmen of the Senate and House Budget committees.Senate Budget Committee member Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, suggested instead a greater economic commitment from U.S. allies, changes in the defense procurement process and a re-allocation of troop levels in Europe and Asia.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 1, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Nearly 6,000 donated gallons of Haagen Dazs ice cream, 11,300 portable radios, 5,000 Sony "Walkmans," 612,900 fruit juice boxes, 455 camcorders and 250,000 blank videotapes, 20,000 Frisbees and 100,000 packages of M&Ms have already been delivered to Persian Gulf troops.In addition, a number of department stores, restaurants and other organizations are picking up shipping costs for donated gifts.Mail shipments to the Persian Gulf are running at about 382,000 pounds a day, said Dennis Hauck, international military mail coordinator for the Postal Service.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Iranian troops deployed in and along the Persian Gulf have gone on high alert in anticipation of a U.S. military strike, retaliating for Iran's alleged role in the June bombing of American troops in Saudi Arabia, according to U.S. officials.The move is part of a "concerted Iranian effort" in recent days to try to control the damage from a Saudi-led campaign to finger Iran for the terrorist bombing that killed 19 U.S. troops at Dhahran's Khobar military housing complex, a senior Pentagon official said Tuesday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2003
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - Saudi Arabia, one of the United States' strongest allies in the Middle East, said yesterday that it would take no part in an American-led invasion of "brotherly Iraq" and warned against a breakup of the country in the wake of a war. As if to punctuate the reasons for that position, an explosion ripped through a house in the capital earlier yesterday, killing a man who was apparently building a bomb. The government is investigating any possible link to al-Qaida. Reading a statement on state television yesterday evening in the name of King Fahd, who is incapacitated, Crown Prince Abdullah, the country's de facto ruler, said, "The kingdom will not participate in any way in the war" against Iraq, adding that Saudi Arabia's armed forces would not enter Iraqi territory.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | January 9, 1991
Los Angeles BOB HOPE WAS past due at a press conference with some of the TV critics gathered here. An NBC public relations type whispered to another that there was no answer to a knock on Hope's door. The key to his room was located."You know, I went up to my room, sat down in a chair and fell asleep," Hope confessed to the critics later, admitting that he still hasn't recovered from his trip to visit the troops in Saudi Arabia. "I feel fine, but I'm tired."I got back a week ago. Five o'clock in the morning we left Saudi Arabia and flew back to Washington.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | November 29, 1990
THERE WILL BE 400,000 American soldiers in Saudi Arabia by January. The question no longer is "Why are we there?" but rather "Where is everybody else?"President Bush is having a tough time answering that one.We know why some of the major countries aren't there. For example, Japan isn't there because it lost World War II, and since it has done so well since, it doesn't want to win one. Also, because the Japanese produce most of the stereo equipment for the United States, Washington feels that it would be best to defer essential Japanese workers and keep them manufacturing Walkmans for our boys in the gulf.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Iranian troops deployed in and along the Persian Gulf have gone on high alert in anticipation of a U.S. military strike, retaliating for Iran's alleged role in the June bombing of American troops in Saudi Arabia, according to U.S. officials.The move is part of a "concerted Iranian effort" in recent days to try to control the damage from a Saudi-led campaign to finger Iran for the terrorist bombing that killed 19 U.S. troops at Dhahran's Khobar military housing complex, a senior Pentagon official said Tuesday.
NEWS
March 3, 1991
While U.S. troops left loved ones at home here in the county and elsewhere while serving in the Persian Gulf war, many Harford residents did not forget them. They organized efforts to show their support forthose called to duty. The efforts involved pride, hard work and spanned a wide segment of the Harford community -- from young school children who worked packing squeeze bottles at Aberdeen Proving Ground tobe sent to troops in Saudi Arabia to seniors in a Bel Air nursing home who made baskets, decorated with yellow bows and the Grand Old Flag, for the troops.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray | January 29, 1991
TAMPA, Fla. -- Next stop for Super Bowl XXV MVP Ottis Anderson: Saudi Arabia -- if security arrangements can be worked out.The veteran New York Giants running back said yesterday that he wants to visit the U.S. troops in Saudi Arabia to show his appreciation for their war effort."
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | January 9, 1991
Los Angeles BOB HOPE WAS past due at a press conference with some of the TV critics gathered here. An NBC public relations type whispered to another that there was no answer to a knock on Hope's door. The key to his room was located."You know, I went up to my room, sat down in a chair and fell asleep," Hope confessed to the critics later, admitting that he still hasn't recovered from his trip to visit the troops in Saudi Arabia. "I feel fine, but I'm tired."I got back a week ago. Five o'clock in the morning we left Saudi Arabia and flew back to Washington.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 27, 1990
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- U.S. front-line combat troops in Saudi Arabia are being told in intelligence briefings that Iraq is likely to use its chemical weapons to slow a U.S. ground offensive into Kuwait.These warnings go beyond what the military has said in the past and apparently reflect a conclusion that Iraq would turn to poison gas in an effort to thwart the stronger U.S. and other forces -- much as it did to fend off Iranian human-wave attacks during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war."From the information they give me, I expect it to happen," said Army Pfc. Andrew Garrett, 20, of Joplin, Mo., an infantry specialist in chemical decontamination.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 6, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Linking U.S. policy in the Persian Gulf to the politically volatile issue of a tax increase, powerful Democratic voices in Congress are raising the possibility of a surcharge to finance the enormous cost of the military expedition.Rep. Dan Rostenkowski, D-Ill., chairman of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, endorsed the idea of the levy yesterday, following the lead of the Democratic chairmen of the Senate and House Budget committees.Senate Budget Committee member Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, suggested instead a greater economic commitment from U.S. allies, changes in the defense procurement process and a re-allocation of troop levels in Europe and Asia.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 27, 1990
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- U.S. front-line combat troops in Saudi Arabia are being told in intelligence briefings that Iraq is likely to use its chemical weapons to slow a U.S. ground offensive into Kuwait.These warnings go beyond what the military has said in the past and apparently reflect a conclusion that Iraq would turn to poison gas in an effort to thwart the stronger U.S. and other forces -- much as it did to fend off Iranian human-wave attacks during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war."From the information they give me, I expect it to happen," said Army Pfc. Andrew Garrett, 20, of Joplin, Mo., an infantry specialist in chemical decontamination.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 1, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Nearly 6,000 donated gallons of Haagen Dazs ice cream, 11,300 portable radios, 5,000 Sony "Walkmans," 612,900 fruit juice boxes, 455 camcorders and 250,000 blank videotapes, 20,000 Frisbees and 100,000 packages of M&Ms have already been delivered to Persian Gulf troops.In addition, a number of department stores, restaurants and other organizations are picking up shipping costs for donated gifts.Mail shipments to the Persian Gulf are running at about 382,000 pounds a day, said Dennis Hauck, international military mail coordinator for the Postal Service.
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