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Troops In Bosnia

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By Los Angeles Times | February 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- French soldiers thwarted a planned terrorist attack on NATO troops in Bosnia yesterday when they raided a house being used as a bomb factory and arrested 11 heavily armed foreign guerrillas, including five Iranians, a senior U.S. official said.The official said the guerrillas, part of a contingent of Islamic militants who fought on the side of the Muslim-led Bosnian government during 3 1/2 years of ethnic war, were planning to bomb facilities of the NATO-led peace force.If the plot had succeeded, it would have marked the first attack on North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops since they began ,, their enforcement of the Bosnia peace accords negotiated late last year in Dayton, Ohio.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 27, 2001
BRUSSELS, Belgium - Although the Pentagon has said it wants to reduce NATO's peacekeeping mission in Bosnia, the alliance has decided that only modest cuts can safely be made at this time, Western officials say. Under a plan approved by NATO ambassadors last week and expected to be announced Tuesday, the alliance's peacekeeping force will be reduced from 21,000 to 18,000. The U.S. contingent in Bosnia, which is in the process of being cut to 3,600 troops, would be reduced to 3,100. And although NATO will consider steeper cuts later, the alliance's top military commander cautioned that they cannot be carried out until Bosnia has an effective police force and a functioning judicial system.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On one level, President Clinton's decision to keep U.S. troops in Bosnia well past their one-year deadline is a blatant about-face.Last year, when he was selling America on helping to enforce a peace settlement in the Balkans, Clinton promised that the troops would be home by the end of 1996. Last week, to almost nobody's surprise, he said that some GIs would be needed for 18 months more.Yes, that's an about-face. But something else is going on, too.The Bosnia decision shattered one pillar of recent military thinking: the need for a clear-cut exit strategy whenever U.S. troops are put in harm's way. And as if to show how easy it is now to commit U.S. troops abroad, Clinton announced at the same news conference that GIs would join a Canadian-led peacekeeping unit in Zaire.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Concerned about possible retaliation by President Slobodan Milosevic, the Pentagon has contingency plans for responding to attacks on the thousands of U.S. peacekeeping troops now in the former Yugoslav republic of Bosnia but has not altered operations there."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Mark Matthews and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Gen. John Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, yesterday defended the administration's pledge to deploy up to 25,000 U.S. peacekeeping troops in Bosnia, telling members of Congress that the force had to be large enough to avoid being "pushed around."General Shalikashvili said that if the warring parties in Bosnia negotiated a settlement, no more than half the NATO peacekeeping troops would be from the United States."It is very important that . . . they are robust enough to take care of themselves, and to ensure the freedom of movement so that they don't get pushed around like [the U.N. peacekeeping force]
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | March 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A U.S. military role enforcing a peace settlement in Bosnia-Herzegovina -- as suggested by the Clinton administration -- would commit up to 75,000 U.S. soldiers for as long as 10 years, according to U.S. and NATO military planners.President Clinton has declared his willingness to commit military forces to a multinational peacekeeping effort once the warring parties in the former Yugoslavian republic reach a peace accord, although he has stopped short of making an explicit offer of ground forces.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Concerned about possible retaliation by President Slobodan Milosevic, the Pentagon has contingency plans for responding to attacks on the thousands of U.S. peacekeeping troops now in the former Yugoslav republic of Bosnia but has not altered operations there."
NEWS
October 10, 1993
Croats pounded Muslim soldiers and civilians in MOSTAR with mortar bombs while fighting was reported in central Bosnia around VITEZ between the Muslim-led Bosnian army and Croat fighters.The commander of U.N. troops in former Yugoslavia, General Jean Cot, said a United Nations Security Council vote had alienated Serb separatists holding a third of the republic and has deployed him on a mission without enough muscle.Spanish Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez visited Spanish U.N. troops in Bosnia and said his country would review its peacekeeping role there unless peace efforts showed some progress.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 1997
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Richard C. Holbrooke, who was sent here by the Clinton administration to salvage the faltering Bosnia peace accords, ended negotiations with Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic yesterday without any major breakthrough.A top item on the agenda with Milosevic was how to deal with Radovan Karadzic, the former Bosnian Serb leader who has been charged with war crimes.But Holbrooke acknowledged he was "skeptical" of a pledge made at the meeting that Karadzic would be stopped from wielding power in the Serbian-held part of Bosnia.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 13, 1997
COPENHAGEN, Denmark -- As he ended a weeklong trip to Europe, President Clinton kept the door open yesterday to a U.S. military role in Bosnia next year after the current deployment of American and other NATO peacekeeping troops ends.Speaking to reporters a day after a Senate vote urging that the president make good on his pledge to remove ground troops by June 30, 1998, Clinton said, "I believe the present operation will have run its course by then, and we'll have to discuss what, if any, involvement the United States should have there."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- With an ease that would have been impossible a few years ago, President Clinton is laying the groundwork for keeping a substantial number of American troops in Bosnia and Herzegovina well beyond his declared pullout date of June. The White House insists that Clinton has reached no final decision to keep a force in Bosnia, let alone how many troops it would contain, what its purpose would be or how long it would stay.But administration aides are making the case that keeping an international force in Bosnia beyond June is essential to preserving the progress achieved in the two years since the 1995 Dayton peace accords.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 1997
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Richard C. Holbrooke, who was sent here by the Clinton administration to salvage the faltering Bosnia peace accords, ended negotiations with Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic yesterday without any major breakthrough.A top item on the agenda with Milosevic was how to deal with Radovan Karadzic, the former Bosnian Serb leader who has been charged with war crimes.But Holbrooke acknowledged he was "skeptical" of a pledge made at the meeting that Karadzic would be stopped from wielding power in the Serbian-held part of Bosnia.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 13, 1997
COPENHAGEN, Denmark -- As he ended a weeklong trip to Europe, President Clinton kept the door open yesterday to a U.S. military role in Bosnia next year after the current deployment of American and other NATO peacekeeping troops ends.Speaking to reporters a day after a Senate vote urging that the president make good on his pledge to remove ground troops by June 30, 1998, Clinton said, "I believe the present operation will have run its course by then, and we'll have to discuss what, if any, involvement the United States should have there."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- William S. Cohen, the former Republican senator who has become a front-line symbol of President Clinton's post-election commitment to bipartisanship, won speedy Senate approval yesterday as the nation's 20th defense secretary after promising that U.S. troops in Bosnia would return home within 18 months.The Senate also confirmed Madeleine K. Albright, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, as secretary of state, putting in place two of the main pillars of Clinton's second-term national security team.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On one level, President Clinton's decision to keep U.S. troops in Bosnia well past their one-year deadline is a blatant about-face.Last year, when he was selling America on helping to enforce a peace settlement in the Balkans, Clinton promised that the troops would be home by the end of 1996. Last week, to almost nobody's surprise, he said that some GIs would be needed for 18 months more.Yes, that's an about-face. But something else is going on, too.The Bosnia decision shattered one pillar of recent military thinking: the need for a clear-cut exit strategy whenever U.S. troops are put in harm's way. And as if to show how easy it is now to commit U.S. troops abroad, Clinton announced at the same news conference that GIs would join a Canadian-led peacekeeping unit in Zaire.
NEWS
October 31, 1996
REPUBLICAN Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett is running against Democrat Stephen Crawford in Maryland's Sixth Congressional District, which runs from western Howard County through Western Maryland. The following are excerpts from their responses to a questionnaire from The Sun.Social Security1) What action do you think the 105th Congress should take to assure the financial integrity of Social Security and Medicare?Bartlett: Seniors should be empowered to choose from a variety of health-care programs to find the one best tailored to their individual needs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 23, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration, which told Congress last week that 20,000 U.S. troops that would be sent to help enforce a peace accord in Bosnia would come home ZTC within a year, now says that the one-year time frame is merely an estimate.In separate appearances on television news shows yesterday, Secretary of Defense William J. Perry and Secretary of State Warren Christopher left open the possibility that the mission could be longer.Asked on the NBC news program "Meet the Press" whether he could guarantee that the United States would stay in Bosnia only a year, Mr. Perry said: "Not at this time.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- With an ease that would have been impossible a few years ago, President Clinton is laying the groundwork for keeping a substantial number of American troops in Bosnia and Herzegovina well beyond his declared pullout date of June. The White House insists that Clinton has reached no final decision to keep a force in Bosnia, let alone how many troops it would contain, what its purpose would be or how long it would stay.But administration aides are making the case that keeping an international force in Bosnia beyond June is essential to preserving the progress achieved in the two years since the 1995 Dayton peace accords.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- French soldiers thwarted a planned terrorist attack on NATO troops in Bosnia yesterday when they raided a house being used as a bomb factory and arrested 11 heavily armed foreign guerrillas, including five Iranians, a senior U.S. official said.The official said the guerrillas, part of a contingent of Islamic militants who fought on the side of the Muslim-led Bosnian government during 3 1/2 years of ethnic war, were planning to bomb facilities of the NATO-led peace force.If the plot had succeeded, it would have marked the first attack on North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops since they began ,, their enforcement of the Bosnia peace accords negotiated late last year in Dayton, Ohio.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Support the troops if not the mission. That was the mixed signal on Bosnia sent from yesterday's Senate debate on the deployment of 20,000 U.S. troops."
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