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By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
When John J. Costa agreed to buy a $29.95 package of seasonings to benefit the Maryland Troopers Association, he didn't realize that the group would get only $3.86. The rest went to a Tennessee company that makes food products and employs telemarketers to sell them in Maryland and elsewhere."Now I really feel ripped off," said Mr. Costa, a retired executive who lives in Hagerstown.Mr. Costa is one of thousands of Marylanders who have agreed to buy products to support the troopers, whose association receives only 12.89 percent of the proceeds.
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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
Union leaders concerned about the way Maryland State Police Superintendent Col. Edward T. Norris is reorganizing the department are surveying troopers to determine whether they have confidence in their new commander. "We want to get a consensus," said Jim Wobbleton, president of the State Law Enforcement Officers Labor Alliance. "We need to know what the majority of troopers think and present that to the administration." The labor alliance is the official bargaining unit for troopers and state-employed officers.
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson | January 12, 1991
A labor group representing most Maryland state troopers filed a legal challenge yesterday to a settlement reached in a $45 million discrimination lawsuit filed by a group of black troopers.In papers filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, the predominantly white Maryland Troopers Association, which represents more than 1,700 current and retired state troopers, said the settlement of the black troopers' lawsuit violates the constitutional rights of white male troopers and of other troopers by outlining a five-year timetable for increasing black representation in ranks up through lieutenant colonel.
NEWS
September 6, 1998
Sheriff Brown clueless about State PoliceOn Aug. 23, The Sun in Carroll featured a lengthy article about the GOP primary for sheriff in Carroll County ("GOP primary for sheriff replays 1994").During the course of an interview with Sun staff writer Mary Gail Hare, Sheriff John H. Brown reportedly made comments that demonstrate a lack of respect and understanding for the role that members of the Maryland State Police play in the law enforcement community.At a time when it is critical for all law enforcement agencies to work in unison, the actions and comments of Sheriff Brown have impeded efforts to maximize cohesiveness.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
Maryland State Police yesterday announced a $20,000 reward for information leading to an arrest and conviction in the shooting of a trooper last week near Abingdon, in Harford County.Although investigators have not determined a motive for the shooting, they have said that Trooper Michael T. Hughes, who was released from an undisclosed hospital last weekend, may have been targeted in an ambush. Hughes works out of the JFK barracks where, police said, he has been active in efforts to thwart drug trafficking on Interstate 95.Hughes, 30, was shot in the upper left arm Aug. 27 in the Long Bar Harbor community as he headed home in his marked car after completing a shift, police said.
NEWS
By Mike Smith Guest columnist | October 27, 1991
The Maryland Troopers Association has supported teachers, health care workers and other public safety employees in the past; we presentlysupport these vital workers and will continue to serve as advocates for them in the future.However, a misconception is being disseminated that the loss of public safety, teaching and health care positions is substituting for firing troopers.None of the above classifications of employees are being sacrificed in place of the Maryland State Police. Job restorations were paid for with other cuts within our own budget.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson Jay Apperson is a reporter for the Anne Arundel County Sun, a suburban edition of The Sun | January 4, 1991
A $45 million discrimination lawsuit filed almost six years ago by a group of black state troopers has been settled for less than $1 million. But a predominantly white labor organization representing most troopers is weighing a challenge to the agreement.The settlement, the product of more than five years of talks between attorneys for the state and the Coalition of Black Maryland State Troopers Inc., outlines a five-year timetable for increasing to 22 percent black representation in ranks up through first sergeant.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 9, 1991
The Maryland Troopers Association went to court yesterday, asking a Baltimore County Circuit Court judge to stop the imminent layoffs of 83 troopers and accusing the state of age discrimination in its plan to meet a $450 million deficit.But in a brief appearance before Judge Joseph F. Murphy Jr., attorneys for the state and for the troopers agreed to wait a day in hopes that the General Assembly and Gov. William Donald Schaefer can find other ways to balance the budget.If the layoffs are still pending tomorrow morning, Judge Murphy will hear the troopers' arguments that the state violated their rights and that he should block the layoffs until the suit has been decided.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
Saying Gov. William Donald Schaefer's plan to furlough about 300 state police officers is a threat to public safety, the Maryland Troopers Association filed suit yesterday to prevent the furlough plan from being enforced.The suit was filed in Baltimore County Circuit Court on behalf of the 1,700 sworn Maryland State Police troopers.The governor ordered most state employees to take off up to five days without pay between Feb. 1 and June 30 to make up for a budget deficit.Col. Elmer H. Tippett, state police superintendent, issued an order requiring all non-patrol state police to take up to five furlough days, depending on their salaries.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Mary Gail Hare and Maria Archangelo and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writers | December 29, 1991
For 23 years, retired state police Cpl. Charles "Chuck" Lukowski donned the same uniform, complete with badge and gun.But on the Sunday before Christmas, Lukowski could be found decked out in more famous duds, the kind that consist of the big red suit and fuzzy white beard that make little kids' hearts beat a little faster.About 100 children filled the Westminster Fire Hall, hoping Santa Lukowski would make their wishes come true.All dressed in a white and red party dress, Kellie Keeney, 16 months, arrived a little ahead of Santa.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | December 1, 1996
DO THE PEOPLE who put bumper stickers on their cars actually read them?It's a question that I'm asking more frequently as I buckle up and venture into the hazardous world of public highways.Often asked in anger, this exasperating question may be rephrased as: Can the people who put bumper stickers on their cars actually read?A recent commuting day turned up three prime examples of driver illiteracy.While I was driving down a steep hill at or about the posted speed of 40 miles an hour, a Cadillac pulled out in front of me and stuttered for a few terrifying moments as he finally made it up to speed, my brakes pumping all the while.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
Maryland State Police yesterday announced a $20,000 reward for information leading to an arrest and conviction in the shooting of a trooper last week near Abingdon, in Harford County.Although investigators have not determined a motive for the shooting, they have said that Trooper Michael T. Hughes, who was released from an undisclosed hospital last weekend, may have been targeted in an ambush. Hughes works out of the JFK barracks where, police said, he has been active in efforts to thwart drug trafficking on Interstate 95.Hughes, 30, was shot in the upper left arm Aug. 27 in the Long Bar Harbor community as he headed home in his marked car after completing a shift, police said.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
For Virginia Lewis, the first woman elected president of the Maryland Troopers Association -- and the only woman to head such a group in the nation -- breaking barriers is nothing new. She was among the first six women to graduate from the state's training academy."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | May 8, 1993
A federal appeals court yesterday knocked down a Maryland State Police affirmative action plan that had sought to increase the number of black troopers to 22 percent of the 1,577-member force.The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said in a ruling released yesterday that there was not enough evidence of discrimination against blacks to require state police to use the court-ordered plan for hiring and promoting troopers.The court's opinion, written by Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson, said the affirmative action plan was unconstitutional because it imposed "hard-and-fast racial quotas," which would "deny some persons the opportunity to be a state trooper or to advance as a state trooper solely because they belong to a certain race."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
When John J. Costa agreed to buy a $29.95 package of seasonings to benefit the Maryland Troopers Association, he didn't realize that the group would get only $3.86. The rest went to a Tennessee company that makes food products and employs telemarketers to sell them in Maryland and elsewhere."Now I really feel ripped off," said Mr. Costa, a retired executive who lives in Hagerstown.Mr. Costa is one of thousands of Marylanders who have agreed to buy products to support the troopers, whose association receives only 12.89 percent of the proceeds.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
Saying Gov. William Donald Schaefer's plan to furlough about 300 state police officers is a threat to public safety, the Maryland Troopers Association filed suit yesterday to prevent the furlough plan from being enforced.The suit was filed in Baltimore County Circuit Court on behalf of the 1,700 sworn Maryland State Police troopers.The governor ordered most state employees to take off up to five days without pay between Feb. 1 and June 30 to make up for a budget deficit.Col. Elmer H. Tippett, state police superintendent, issued an order requiring all non-patrol state police to take up to five furlough days, depending on their salaries.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
Union leaders concerned about the way Maryland State Police Superintendent Col. Edward T. Norris is reorganizing the department are surveying troopers to determine whether they have confidence in their new commander. "We want to get a consensus," said Jim Wobbleton, president of the State Law Enforcement Officers Labor Alliance. "We need to know what the majority of troopers think and present that to the administration." The labor alliance is the official bargaining unit for troopers and state-employed officers.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | December 23, 1991
On Christmas, while many of her married relatives are out visiting and exchanging gifts, Lynn Koch plans to stay home with her 4-year-old daughter, Amanda."
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Mary Gail Hare and Maria Archangelo and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writers | December 29, 1991
For 23 years, retired state police Cpl. Charles "Chuck" Lukowski donned the same uniform, complete with badge and gun.But on the Sunday before Christmas, Lukowski could be found decked out in more famous duds, the kind that consist of the big red suit and fuzzy white beard that make little kids' hearts beat a little faster.About 100 children filled the Westminster Fire Hall, hoping Santa Lukowski would make their wishes come true.All dressed in a white and red party dress, Kellie Keeney, 16 months, arrived a little ahead of Santa.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | December 23, 1991
On Christmas, while many of her married relatives are out visiting and exchanging gifts, Lynn Koch plans to stay home with her 4-year-old daughter, Amanda."
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