Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTroop
IN THE NEWS

Troop

NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1995
Lee Levinson's troop gave him a boisterous cheer as Assistant Scoutmaster Jerry Grim welcomed him to the rank of second-class Boy Scout.The ceremony was a moment of triumph for the 16-year-old Scout, who has cerebral palsy and is visually impaired. It took him almost 2 1/2 years to move from tenderfoot status to the second-class rank -- a transition that takes six months for most Scouts.Such milestones are cause for celebration in Troop 730, where the Scouts are mentally and physically disabled.
Advertisement
EXPLORE
September 21, 2011
Nick Conroy, an Eagle Scout candidate from Troop 109, is constructing a prayer garden at the Solid Rock Baptist Church on Hammonds Ferry Road as his Eagle project. The garden will be open to the public. The sophomore at Lansdowne High School started his project at age 14 after seeing other Scouts in his troop scramble to get their projects done before the deadline of their 18th birthday. He said he could have started his Eagle project sooner, but he postponed it to help older Scouts finish their projects before the deadline.
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | May 31, 1994
A number of East Columbia students are the proud recipients of the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers Inc. 1993/94 statewide "Reflections" arts contest awards.The students' work was judged in grades and subject categories. Valerie Brammer of Oakland Mills High School won first place and Sonia Keiner of Hammond High School placed second in the photography category for grades 10 through 12.Russell Brammer of Oakland Mills Middle School placed second in photography for grades four to six, and Julie Frostbutter of Hammond Elementary School won an Outstanding Interpretation music award for grades four to six.*Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker was host at ceremonies last Tuesday recognizing Girl Scouts who have earned Gold Scout awards and Boy Scouts who have achieved Eagle Scout, and our side of town had its share of honorees.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 30, 2003
A 12-year-old Sykesville Boy Scout was recovering yesterday in a Pittsburgh hospital after a seven-hour rescue from a southwestern Pennsylvania cavern, a hospital spokeswoman said. John Graybeal was in good condition, according to the spokeswoman for Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. The Mountview Middle School sixth-grader said he entered Laurel Caverns in Hopwood, Pa., about 50 miles south of Pittsburgh, with his troop and a professional guide Saturday. The troop was exploring an area called "the Beach," when John slipped and fell between rocks, said David Cale, who owns the land and buildings at Laurel Caverns.
NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2004
Eight girls in Harford County recently received the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest honor given in the Girl Scouts program. Allison Daniels, Melanie Houlihan, Erin Linnan, Kathleen McCaig, Ashley Mellott, Jaime Myers, Lauren Snyder and Pamela Staso were honored at a ceremony in Westminster, joining more than 3,000 young women across the country to earn the award this year. In order to be eligible for the award, a Girl Scout must be 15 to 17 years old. She must also complete a project, designed to help "a community, a school or a faith-based institution."
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | January 30, 1995
Few things matter more to George Baker than making a difference in the lives of boys."I believe we were put here for God's will," said the scoutmaster of Ellicott City's Troop 874. "To set a godly example and set them on the road to manhood."That dedication has earned the Owen Brown resident a Silver Beaver Award, the highest honor bestowed on adults in scouting."He's kind of the heart and soul of the group," said Donald Rascoe, Troop 874's committee chairman. "He works extremely well with boys."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2002
Barry R. Malpass, a furniture refinisher and war veteran who touched the lives of countless children as a Boy Scout leader for more than 40 years, died of liver cancer Saturday at his Frederick Road home near Catonsville. He was 76. He was born in the city's Reservoir Hill neighborhood. After completing sixth grade, he and his identical twin brother, Billy, attended vocational school until they were 16 - when both enlisted in the merchant marine and traveled around the world. Returning to Baltimore, he married his childhood sweetheart, JoAnn, on Father's Day in 1950, and began working as a furniture refinisher in his father's business, M.D. Malpass & Sons on Reisterstown Road.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2001
THE RAIN OVER the weekend didn't dampen the spirit of Boy Scout Troop 719 as Scouts, parents and leaders set up their annual Christmas tree lot in the parking lot at Carrolltown Center. Everyone worked together unloading trees from two trucks and setting them up for display under strings of Christmas lights. Scoutmaster Wayne Stuckey and assistant Scoutmaster Tim Dulany were there, with parents and about 20 Scouts. Tree sales began Saturday and will continue through Dec. 17. This season marks the 34th year the Eldersburg troop has sold Christmas trees as a fund-raiser.
NEWS
June 12, 2007
Monsignor James P. Farmer of St. Ursula Catholic Church may have done right by his church, but he has done a disservice to the Boy Scouts who are members of the troop sponsored by his Parkville parish. He has barred from Boy Scout functions politicians who oppose Catholic teachings, notably on embryonic stem cell research, for no other reason than the view they hold. That surely wouldn't pass a Scout's test of courtesy, respect for others or, for that matter, good citizenship. As an organization, the Boy Scouts of America tries to keep politics out; Monsignor Farmer's edict has needlessly politicized an aspect of scouting life.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt | May 19, 1991
They tie knots, go camping, earn merit badges and meet the challenges. They do it more slowly than most other Boy Scouts, but they do it just the same.The 13 active Scouts of Troop 700, ages 11 to 28, are mentally and physically disabled. They are led by an Ellicott City couple, Scoutmaster Mike Parker and his wife, Norene, assistant scoutmaster, who decided to tinker with the official Boy Scouts of America approach to "special" activities for youngsters who are disabled."Troop 700 is only handicapped in respect to the physical and intellectual limitations of its Scouts," said Norene Parker, 36, a Howard County school-bus driver.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.