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Trompe L Oeil

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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2003
Displaying more than 100 works of art, McBride Gallery's Autumn Celebration is an exciting visual feast of representational art. Through Nov. 9, more than half of McBride's 60 artists are exhibiting recent works in oil, watercolor, acrylic, photography and sculpture at the gallery on Main Street in Annapolis. At the opening Sunday, a number of the artists whom McBride's represents were on hand, including two who specialize in trompe l'oeil (trick the eye) - one in the tradition of old Dutch masters and another with an interest in local sports.
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CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
The question had been nagging for almost the entire half-hour spent seated at the kitchen table of Mary Veiga and Jeff Lipkin's home in Baltimore. Just as the urge to know the cost of a thick, pure slab of marble on the kitchen counter is about to trump politeness, the answer is freely given. "The counter is painted to look like white marble," explained Veiga, 44, a decorative painter and muralist who also dabbles in trompe l'oeil , the painting style designed to trick the eye. "I like to keep with the style of a house; otherwise it doesn't make sense.
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FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 30, 1996
Why, I sometimes wonder, is there such a craze these days for faux finishes, trompe l'oeil and all the other painterly tricks intended to fool the eye? I've decided there's probably more to it than, if you'll excuse me, meets the eye.Historically, this technique was used solely for aesthetic reasons. Some of Europe's great palaces still display examples of painters' simulations of draperies, moldings and cornices. Their efforts to mimic the look of three-dimensional decorative and architectural elements were not meant to be inexpensive substitutes for the real thing.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2003
Displaying more than 100 works of art, McBride Gallery's Autumn Celebration is an exciting visual feast of representational art. Through Nov. 9, more than half of McBride's 60 artists are exhibiting recent works in oil, watercolor, acrylic, photography and sculpture at the gallery on Main Street in Annapolis. At the opening Sunday, a number of the artists whom McBride's represents were on hand, including two who specialize in trompe l'oeil (trick the eye) - one in the tradition of old Dutch masters and another with an interest in local sports.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | May 15, 1994
Inspired by the archaeological excavations at Pompeii and elsewhere, 18th-century interior designers in Europe and later America enthusiastically embraced both the spirit of antiquity and specific classical motifs. Since then, classical revivals have come and gone, but interest in the style has never completely died out.Perhaps in reaction to the clutter, ruffles and flounces of recent trends like English country, balanced and classically proportioned interiors are beginning to come into their own again.
FEATURES
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 23, 1998
Deception is at the root of gardening. Gardeners strive to make small spaces appear larger and large areas feel more inviting and cozy. The views have to appear grander than they really are, or must at least hint at impressive vistas.It's not that we can't be satisfied with what we have, but we can't help trying to improve on nature and our own place in it.There is long precedent for this tinkering. Gardeners have been painting landscapes on garden walls, borrowing views from the neighbors and using reflections and illusion to fool the eye for centuries.
NEWS
By Julie Klavens and Julie Klavens,Sun Staff | October 28, 2001
When I was a kid and I went to a friend's house," says Mia Pefinis Jensen, "I would come back and tell my mother how the house was decorated." And on family vacations, "I would look around the hotel to see how it was laid out, what was there."
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer | March 28, 1993
The ability to create illusions has always been one of the strongest tools available to an interior designer.While it's generally true that form should follow function, sometimes a bit of fantasy is needed to make a room come truly alive. In fact, if it weren't for the various design techniques that alter perception of space, we might all be living in white, box-like rooms filled with only the most functional furnishings.A skilled designer is able, through subtle touches, to produce an atmosphere that's conducive to work, play or relaxation.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | April 24, 1994
The modest front of the house in a Baltimore County development doesn't prepare the visitor for the magnificent gardens in back. One certainly doesn't expect to find a '37 Lincoln and a '48 Cadillac limousine (both in mint condition) in the garage. And the interior of the house, with its lush floral motifs and cherished antiques will be particularly surprising.It's a small home, full of luxurious details. After a quarter of a century in the same space, the owners decided to redo it from top to bottom rather than move into a grander home.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
The question had been nagging for almost the entire half-hour spent seated at the kitchen table of Mary Veiga and Jeff Lipkin's home in Baltimore. Just as the urge to know the cost of a thick, pure slab of marble on the kitchen counter is about to trump politeness, the answer is freely given. "The counter is painted to look like white marble," explained Veiga, 44, a decorative painter and muralist who also dabbles in trompe l'oeil , the painting style designed to trick the eye. "I like to keep with the style of a house; otherwise it doesn't make sense.
NEWS
By Julie Klavens and Julie Klavens,Sun Staff | October 28, 2001
When I was a kid and I went to a friend's house," says Mia Pefinis Jensen, "I would come back and tell my mother how the house was decorated." And on family vacations, "I would look around the hotel to see how it was laid out, what was there."
FEATURES
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 23, 1998
Deception is at the root of gardening. Gardeners strive to make small spaces appear larger and large areas feel more inviting and cozy. The views have to appear grander than they really are, or must at least hint at impressive vistas.It's not that we can't be satisfied with what we have, but we can't help trying to improve on nature and our own place in it.There is long precedent for this tinkering. Gardeners have been painting landscapes on garden walls, borrowing views from the neighbors and using reflections and illusion to fool the eye for centuries.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 1997
STUDENTS ANSWERED math questions, raced to consume snacks (no hands allowed) and heard a teacher's voice changed into a chipmunk's.It was all part of the Radio Zone School Tour '97 at Longfellow Elementary School last week.Kenny Curtis, host of "The Breakfast Bunch," Radio Zone's locally produced live morning show, visited the school Nov. 17.Accompanying him were co-host Thea Carey and promotions coordinator Terri Saylor.They taped a one-hour segment that was broadcast on the children's station the next morning.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 20, 1996
Bill Cochran is an artist who doesn't just like bridges. He believes in them."A bridge connects separate lands," he says. "It makes common ground."And over the last four years, Cochran has made a bridge in Frederick common ground for the whole community.Spanning Carroll Creek near the center of town is a handsome bridge that looks as if it's from a different age, its three arches composed of stones in an eye-pleasing variety of sizes and colors -- no two quite alike. Sculptural medallions decorate each side, and smaller carved motifs abound on individual stones -- a swan, a flower, a bundle of grain, clasped hands, an open church door.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 30, 1996
Why, I sometimes wonder, is there such a craze these days for faux finishes, trompe l'oeil and all the other painterly tricks intended to fool the eye? I've decided there's probably more to it than, if you'll excuse me, meets the eye.Historically, this technique was used solely for aesthetic reasons. Some of Europe's great palaces still display examples of painters' simulations of draperies, moldings and cornices. Their efforts to mimic the look of three-dimensional decorative and architectural elements were not meant to be inexpensive substitutes for the real thing.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | November 20, 1994
Baltimore native Michael Flanagan's "Stations" is a reverent and witty homage to the railroads and steam engines that once crossed the American landscape. All in one, it is an art book, a work of fiction and a historical re-creation and collage. Above all, it is an ingenious and intricate trompe l'oeil -- an artistic deception.At the heart of "Stations," Mr. Flanagan has created a document -- a photograph album -- and then altered it so that it appears to be the work of multiple authors. The result is a filtered, layered glimpse into the past -- page after page of melancholy, homely, yet beautiful images.
NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
The quilt hanging on Kris Wasmer's Joppatowne dining room wall beckons closer examination.You want to touch the intricately designed floral squares and admire the delicate stitches.But when reaching out to pull up a corner of the quilt, you don'tfeel the smoothness of cotton fabric between your fingers, only the coolness of a painted wall.The quilt is a trompe l'oeil -- an eye-deceiving wall mural -- painted by Kris and her partner, Kelly Lundahl. The illusion the two artists have created is so effective that even after realizing the quilt is a painting, you still can't resist the urge to reach for the imaginary fabric or touch its "wooden" rack.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 1997
STUDENTS ANSWERED math questions, raced to consume snacks (no hands allowed) and heard a teacher's voice changed into a chipmunk's.It was all part of the Radio Zone School Tour '97 at Longfellow Elementary School last week.Kenny Curtis, host of "The Breakfast Bunch," Radio Zone's locally produced live morning show, visited the school Nov. 17.Accompanying him were co-host Thea Carey and promotions coordinator Terri Saylor.They taped a one-hour segment that was broadcast on the children's station the next morning.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | November 16, 1994
If you can easily find a door to the pool at North Carroll High School, don't try to sneak in for a dip. You'll crash into a cinder block wall.It's a mural.Legend has it that a pool was part of the original building but is no longer used. Seniors tell that to freshman, and challenge them to find it.There might be a pool in the building or there might not be, but it is not as easily found as Stacey Krumrine's legacy to the school -- a door painted on a wall in the hallway next to the weight room.
FEATURES
By Beth Smith | August 14, 1994
Ever wonder how to find the special artists and artisans whose phone numbers often are tucked away in little black books by interior designers and only given out to best clients or sometimes persistent reporters? You know the ones: the men and women who use their talents to give a home a -- of panache; the ones who do all the neat stuff -- painting a striped rug on a hardwood floor, etching a bouquet of blue morning glories into a windowpane, or even painting Fido to hang over the fireplace.
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