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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1996
There's a fascinating documentary on MPT and a wonderful Western comedy on The Family Channel. Take your pick and settle in for a fine evening of TV."Hope & Gloria" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- In the series' final first-run episode, Cindy Williams (the latter half of "Laverne and Shirley") guest stars as a former teen star, now fallen on hard times, who was once Hope and Gloria's idol. She's brought back as co-host of "The Dennis Dupree Show," much to the consternation of Dupree (Alan Thicke)
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By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,[Special to The Sun] | November 25, 2007
The Fall of Troy By Peter Ackroyd Nan A. Talese / Doubleday / 224 pages / $23 Did Troy resemble Homer's description in the Iliad? Heinrich Obermann says, "Yes." His youthful wife, Sophia, isn't so sure. Then two scholars investigate Obermann's archaeological findings. From there, the plot of Peter Ackroyd's The Fall of Troy takes several unexpected twists. Known for his innovative writing style, Ackroyd is a prolific British author who's received numerous awards - including the Whitbread Biography Award, the Guardian Fiction Prize and the Booker Prize for Fiction (shortlist)
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By Los Angeles Times | February 22, 1993
Archaeologists have uncovered strong evidence that the Trojan War described by the poet Homer in the "Iliad," one of the first and most important books in Western literature, actually occurred.The research also shows that Troy and its successors had a unique strategic importance in the ancient world because they dominated a major trade route through the Dardanelles and thereby obtained unprecedented wealth and power.The findings indicate that ancient Troy was much larger than previously believed and may have been the largest city of its era, which stretched from 1700 B.C. to about 1250 B.C.The new evidence, from the first excavations at the fabled city of Troy in nearly 50 years, is to be described this week at separate symposiums in Washington, New York and Troy, Ohio.
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By Richard F. Mollica | March 25, 2007
No amount of money is going to fix the tragedy unfolding under public scrutiny at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the Department of Veterans Affairs. It breaks one's heart to hear dignified young soldiers speak - their words sometimes faltering because of head injuries - about the humiliating treatment they have received in our veterans health care system. Recently, in New England, one wounded soldier who had returned from Iraq committed suicide after being made to wait for outpatient mental health care.
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By Richard F. Mollica | March 25, 2007
No amount of money is going to fix the tragedy unfolding under public scrutiny at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the Department of Veterans Affairs. It breaks one's heart to hear dignified young soldiers speak - their words sometimes faltering because of head injuries - about the humiliating treatment they have received in our veterans health care system. Recently, in New England, one wounded soldier who had returned from Iraq committed suicide after being made to wait for outpatient mental health care.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,[Special to The Sun] | November 25, 2007
The Fall of Troy By Peter Ackroyd Nan A. Talese / Doubleday / 224 pages / $23 Did Troy resemble Homer's description in the Iliad? Heinrich Obermann says, "Yes." His youthful wife, Sophia, isn't so sure. Then two scholars investigate Obermann's archaeological findings. From there, the plot of Peter Ackroyd's The Fall of Troy takes several unexpected twists. Known for his innovative writing style, Ackroyd is a prolific British author who's received numerous awards - including the Whitbread Biography Award, the Guardian Fiction Prize and the Booker Prize for Fiction (shortlist)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1996
Things are kinda lean today, folks, as the networks struggle to catch their breath after sweeps month. A couple of gems show up on cable, though."Baywatch Nights" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Caroline (Yasmine Bleeth) talks a guy out of committing suicide. Nice move. So he begins stalking her. Bummer. NBC."Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Dog bites man is not news, unless it's a rabid dog taking a bite out of someone's fiancee on prime-time TV. Let's see what Dr. Quinn has to say about this one. CBS."
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | November 1, 1992
MEMORIES OF THEFORD ADMINISTRATION.John Updike.Knopf.369 pages. $23.John Updike is an angel with acne. Although the blond-haired, squeaky-clean, middle-class America he seems to celebrate is not part of my own mental neighborhood, I have been enthralled most of my life by the tireless perfection of his descriptive ability, by his power to love and exalt whatever he sees. Like Tolstoy, Chekhov, Proust and Nabokov, he has described things never described before. Perhaps he has seen things never really seen before: the exact way metal shavings curl with heavy gaiety around a lathe, the exact way lifeguards sit on their tall useful thrones.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 23, 1990
"The Civil War" is the best non-fiction television since "Eyes on the Prize."It is the Public Television event of the year.It is television to be savored and celebrated.It is to American documentary filmmaking what "The Iliad" was to epic poetry in ancient Greece.And that ain't the half of it. "The Civil War," the 11-hour series which begins at 8 tonight and runs each night through Thursday on MPT (Channel 22 and 67), is that good."The Civil War" is first and last a documentary. If the word "documentary" is a turnoff, stayed tuned anyway.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | September 16, 1992
Washington -- "Troilus and Cressida" is the oddball Shakespearean play that defies labels. Part history, part romance, part comedy, part tragedy, it can either be seen as all of the above or as something else entirely -- Shakespeare's experiment in satire.At the Shakespeare Theatre in Washington, British director Bill Alexander's assured, striking production is a rich blend of these disparate elements. And there's something else as well. Where most theaters steer clear of this troublesome script, the Shakespeare Theatre has actually managed to unearth added resonances.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1996
There's a fascinating documentary on MPT and a wonderful Western comedy on The Family Channel. Take your pick and settle in for a fine evening of TV."Hope & Gloria" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- In the series' final first-run episode, Cindy Williams (the latter half of "Laverne and Shirley") guest stars as a former teen star, now fallen on hard times, who was once Hope and Gloria's idol. She's brought back as co-host of "The Dennis Dupree Show," much to the consternation of Dupree (Alan Thicke)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1996
Things are kinda lean today, folks, as the networks struggle to catch their breath after sweeps month. A couple of gems show up on cable, though."Baywatch Nights" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Caroline (Yasmine Bleeth) talks a guy out of committing suicide. Nice move. So he begins stalking her. Bummer. NBC."Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Dog bites man is not news, unless it's a rabid dog taking a bite out of someone's fiancee on prime-time TV. Let's see what Dr. Quinn has to say about this one. CBS."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 22, 1993
Archaeologists have uncovered strong evidence that the Trojan War described by the poet Homer in the "Iliad," one of the first and most important books in Western literature, actually occurred.The research also shows that Troy and its successors had a unique strategic importance in the ancient world because they dominated a major trade route through the Dardanelles and thereby obtained unprecedented wealth and power.The findings indicate that ancient Troy was much larger than previously believed and may have been the largest city of its era, which stretched from 1700 B.C. to about 1250 B.C.The new evidence, from the first excavations at the fabled city of Troy in nearly 50 years, is to be described this week at separate symposiums in Washington, New York and Troy, Ohio.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | November 1, 1992
MEMORIES OF THEFORD ADMINISTRATION.John Updike.Knopf.369 pages. $23.John Updike is an angel with acne. Although the blond-haired, squeaky-clean, middle-class America he seems to celebrate is not part of my own mental neighborhood, I have been enthralled most of my life by the tireless perfection of his descriptive ability, by his power to love and exalt whatever he sees. Like Tolstoy, Chekhov, Proust and Nabokov, he has described things never described before. Perhaps he has seen things never really seen before: the exact way metal shavings curl with heavy gaiety around a lathe, the exact way lifeguards sit on their tall useful thrones.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 23, 1990
"The Civil War" is the best non-fiction television since "Eyes on the Prize."It is the Public Television event of the year.It is television to be savored and celebrated.It is to American documentary filmmaking what "The Iliad" was to epic poetry in ancient Greece.And that ain't the half of it. "The Civil War," the 11-hour series which begins at 8 tonight and runs each night through Thursday on MPT (Channel 22 and 67), is that good."The Civil War" is first and last a documentary. If the word "documentary" is a turnoff, stayed tuned anyway.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN ARTS WRITER | January 15, 2006
Think of it not merely as something with which to make music. Think of it not just as a container to protect the mystery within. Think of it as an artwork in its own right, intricate and deceptive. Think of it as a Trojan horse. John Diebboll's colored pencils sketch out the similarities between the piano, the wooden equine on wheels used to win the Trojan war, and Trojans, the opera by Hector Berlioz. A giant horse's head forms the rear of the piano case and looms over a scene from the opera in which Dido and Aeneas declare their love in a lush garden.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | June 17, 1993
Walk into the show of Romare Bearden's prints at th Baltimore Museum of Art and you are surrounded by a symphony of visual melodies. These works are rich and deep, a full orchestra playing flat out, and they envelop you with beauty.Bearden was an African-American whose work addresses the black experience in America, but its implications are much wider than that; he ranged history, mythology and the history of art, from the Trojan War and the Bible to Dutch genre painting, collage and cubism, to create images that speak to the effort to find a commonality of heritage and values in a polyglot world.
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