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NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
Longtime Towson favorite Cafe Troia (31 W. Allegheny Ave., 410-337-0133) has officially moved to better, bigger digs across the street from its old location. The "ribbon cutting" was last Thursday. Carol Troia, who owns the restaurant with her daughter Lisa Troia Martin, said the new place holds 30 percent more diners. There's a larger bar and a "beautiful, new, updated, larger kitchen." The new kitchen has a charbroiler, which means more steaks and chops have been added to the Italian menu.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Baltimore County Restaurant Week begins Friday, and Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and the Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce are kicking things off Wednesday at Cafe Troia.   Restaurants participating in Baltimore County's Summer Restaurant Week , which runs Aug. 10-19, are offering fixed-price one-, two- and three-course lunches and dinners. At Wednesday's kick-off event , which begins at 11 a.m., chefs from participating restaurants like Barrett's Grill, Basta Pasta Ristorante, Cafe Troia, Island View Waterfront Cafe, the Milton Inn and Towson Tavern will prepare some of their menu specials for sampling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
Cafe Troia has always been something of an anomaly in Towson, a white-tablecloth restaurant that has managed to survive, even flourish, for 23 years. These are scary times to deviate from the "if it ain't broke" dictum, but when their landlord decided to raise the rent, Carol Troia and her daughter Lisa Troia Martin, who own the restaurant, solved the problem by moving across the street to larger quarters. I happened to love the old space, which some thought cramped; but I was happy to have an excuse to eat at Cafe Troia again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2010
The old Cafe Troia space in Towson is now a new Italian restaurant named Taste Mediterranean Grille . The chef here, Luigi Palumbo, recently moved to the area with his family from his hometown in Bacoli, Naples, where he ran a restaurant named Ristorante a Ridosso ; Taste is his first venture in the United States. Most of what I know about the chef and the new restaurant comes from Rafael Coppola, a longtime fixture on the Baltimore dining scene who was brought in by the restaurant's ownership group to help Palumbo translate the Neapolitan dining experience for the American suburbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 17, 1998
Troia the Bistro at the Walters closed quietly this week, with no new tenant in the wings to take over the handsome space. Why Troia left depends on whom you talk to."Troia's a great restaurant," says Lynn Wolfe, manager of public relations for the Walters Art Gallery. "But it was a hard mix with a museum. People were looking for something more casual."The Walters is moving its gift shop into part of the dining room during the current renovation of its 1974 building. Carol Troia, who with her husband, Gino, opened the original Cafe Troia in Towson, says, "Gino isn't interested in running it anymore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,special to the Sun | July 10, 2008
Grano, the new Hampden pasta joint, is indie-movie cute. You know those movies where some type-A executive loses it all, rediscovers his muse and ends up opening the place of his dreams, a modest bakery or a sweet little cafe, the kind with just a couple of tables and a handful of stools at the counter, where the hero's quirky friends can chat while the emotionally restored hero prepares their meals. Grano is a place like that, and the hero is being played by none other than Gino Troia, known best for the long-running Cafe Troia, the widely admired Towson restaurant open since 1984 with which he is no longer directly involved.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 9, 1997
Good restaurants have personalities all their own. If I tell you that Cafe Troia in Towson is an Italian restaurant, don't have any preconceptions. It's not like other Italian restaurants you've been to.Cafe Troia is just that. A cafe. In spite of having three dining rooms and a sophisticated, expensive menu, it seems homey and unprepossessing -- very much the neighborhood place to eat. Customers on both sides of us were regulars; they greeted our waiter by name.So it comes as no surprise that Nonna's chicken soup is the zuppa del giorno.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 16, 2001
Sometimes when you go out all you want is a quiet place to relax and have good conversation. If the food is fine, so much the better. This is particularly true if you, like me, have been hitting all the high-energy new restaurants that have been opening up downtown. After a while you yearn for a place like the ever-reliable Cafe Troia in Towson. At Cafe Troia there is no music. The white-clothed tables are larger than usual, so you never feel cramped, even when the small dining rooms are filled.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | January 19, 1997
You can't help but have great expectations for your first visit to Troia the Bistro at the Walters. The dining room of the Walters Art Gallery was taken over a couple of months ago by Gino Troia and Katell Thielemann, owners of one of the most respected Italian restaurants in the area, Towson's Cafe Troia. David Rudie from the Milton Inn has been hired as executive chef, and the new bistro's menu is a collaboration between him and Gino Troia. It's an impressive pedigree.Troia the Bistro isn't a second Cafe Troia; and it certainly doesn't have much in common with the Milton Inn, a big ticket, special-occasion restaurant.
NEWS
September 25, 1997
In the Dining Out guide of Sept. 18, an incorrect phone number was listed for Troia, the Bistro at the Walters. The correct number is 410-752-2887.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 9/25/97
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
Cafe Troia has always been something of an anomaly in Towson, a white-tablecloth restaurant that has managed to survive, even flourish, for 23 years. These are scary times to deviate from the "if it ain't broke" dictum, but when their landlord decided to raise the rent, Carol Troia and her daughter Lisa Troia Martin, who own the restaurant, solved the problem by moving across the street to larger quarters. I happened to love the old space, which some thought cramped; but I was happy to have an excuse to eat at Cafe Troia again.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | January 21, 2009
Some like it hot. Not rawists. Raw-diet proponents believe food is best eaten as nature made it. That's not boiled, not sauteed, not baked or broiled or braised or steamed or grilled. Sadly, it's not even fried. Anything that takes the temperature of food beyond 118 degrees, or just a few degrees warmer than the warmth of your tongue, is verboten for the raw, or living, foodist. Though science tends to suppose otherwise, raw-ists, typically more extreme vegetarians, believe fire saps food of its vital nutrients, the vitamins and minerals that make it worth eating in the first place.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
Longtime Towson favorite Cafe Troia (31 W. Allegheny Ave., 410-337-0133) has officially moved to better, bigger digs across the street from its old location. The "ribbon cutting" was last Thursday. Carol Troia, who owns the restaurant with her daughter Lisa Troia Martin, said the new place holds 30 percent more diners. There's a larger bar and a "beautiful, new, updated, larger kitchen." The new kitchen has a charbroiler, which means more steaks and chops have been added to the Italian menu.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,special to the Sun | July 10, 2008
Grano, the new Hampden pasta joint, is indie-movie cute. You know those movies where some type-A executive loses it all, rediscovers his muse and ends up opening the place of his dreams, a modest bakery or a sweet little cafe, the kind with just a couple of tables and a handful of stools at the counter, where the hero's quirky friends can chat while the emotionally restored hero prepares their meals. Grano is a place like that, and the hero is being played by none other than Gino Troia, known best for the long-running Cafe Troia, the widely admired Towson restaurant open since 1984 with which he is no longer directly involved.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | July 2, 2008
Several of the restaurants in the new Park Place in Annapolis are national chains, but not the recently opened Carpaccio Tuscan Kitchen and Wine Bar (1 Park Place, 410-268-6569), which features northern Italian food and 40 Italian wines by the glass, as well as some 150 bottles. Carpaccio is part of a local restaurant group, which used to include Cafe Mezzenotte in Severna Park and now consists of a number of casual Italian-themed restaurants like Sazzio, Squisito's and Pomo Grille and the Four Seasons Grille in Gambrills.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | January 27, 2008
The temperature was in the teens outside, but everything inside Cafe Troia was warm and cozy. And we're not just talking about the temperature. The place was filled with laughs and smiles on the faces of about 70 folks who mingled about with glasses of wine in hand and nibbled smoked salmon on toast and mini cheese tarts. How could there not be lots of good cheer? First of all, this was the Second Annual Wine Dinner benefiting the YMCA of Central Maryland. Second, this party wasn't costing the YMCA a dime.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | February 9, 1997
In my review of Troia the Bistro at the Walters, I described the old decor as "stark and white and architectural." Ted Pearson of Rita St. Clair Associates, which redesigned the dining room, pointed out that the color was actually what he calls a "dull medium grey." My mistake, and my apologies.Pub Date: 2/09/97@
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | January 21, 2009
Some like it hot. Not rawists. Raw-diet proponents believe food is best eaten as nature made it. That's not boiled, not sauteed, not baked or broiled or braised or steamed or grilled. Sadly, it's not even fried. Anything that takes the temperature of food beyond 118 degrees, or just a few degrees warmer than the warmth of your tongue, is verboten for the raw, or living, foodist. Though science tends to suppose otherwise, raw-ists, typically more extreme vegetarians, believe fire saps food of its vital nutrients, the vitamins and minerals that make it worth eating in the first place.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | February 5, 2006
Bruschetta -- pronounced BrusKETta, all you non-Italian waiters who have corrected me over the years -- has most of the ingredients for success. It's Canton's new wine bar and deli, owned in part by Gino Troia of Towson's Cafe Troia (which provides many of the Italian delicacies). The food is authentic at a time when Baltimoreans are appreciative of authentic ethnic foods. The place is very casual, the wine flows, and the dishes come as small plates for noshing. So what's not to like? Walk in the small storefront that was formerly Pascale's Italian Deli & Pork Store, and you'll find the shelves of Italian groceries and the deli case filled with good things are decor enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2005
Anyone searching for a tasty and inexpensive meal will find lots of choices in Towson, especially along Allegheny Avenue and York Road, where ethnic restaurants and bars beckon for blocks in every direction. One bright recent addition to this casual dining scene is Zia's, a smoothie and sandwich shop that opened in March. The owner is Daniela Troia, of the Troia family that owns the higher-end Cafe Troia, the Italian restaurant across the street. Troia, who knows the restaurant business well, loves smoothies but couldn't find a nearby place for her favorite drink, so she opened a smoothie shop of her own. The smoothies, offered with a staggering choice of ingredients and add-ons, are lighter and less sweet than other smoothies I've had, and therefore more refreshing.
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