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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
If we can believe the story -- and, really, what stories about this  megalomaniacal guy can't we believe? -- Wagner called "Tristan und Isolde" a "wonder," and declared: "I shall never be able to understand how I could have written anything like it. " There's still something dismaying about this transcendent fusion of music and drama, propelled by revolutionary harmony, heated by a rare, poetic urgency. There's something a little dismaying, too, about Washington National Opera's season-opening production of "Tristan," one of its greatest efforts the company has made in the past dozen or so years.
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By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Coach Brian Kelly knows he won't know if the problems that No. 8 Washington College exposed in Saturday's 16-7 rout against Goucher will be solved until the Gophers take Beldon Field in Towson on Wednesday against No. 19 Gettysburg. But one area he won't have to fret about is the identity of the starter in the cage. Junior Karl Wiszumerski made a game-high 12 saves against the Shoremen in his first career start. He was credited with zero turnovers and was a plus in the clearing game, which is usually a shaky area for first-time goalkeepers.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 1, 1999
Performances of Wagner's "Tristan und Isolde" -- a great and profound work that changed the course of art, literature and philosophy, as well as music in the 19th century -- are rare.One is, therefore, grateful for a production as intelligent and beautifully mounted as the Washington Opera's which opened Saturday at the Kennedy Center. The last production I can remember at the Metropolitan Opera was almost 10 years ago. So infrequent are "Tristans" appearances, that a production in Seattle last summer, with Ben Heppner and Jane Eaglen in the title roles, drew an audience from all over the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
If we can believe the story -- and, really, what stories about this  megalomaniacal guy can't we believe? -- Wagner called "Tristan und Isolde" a "wonder," and declared: "I shall never be able to understand how I could have written anything like it. " There's still something dismaying about this transcendent fusion of music and drama, propelled by revolutionary harmony, heated by a rare, poetic urgency. There's something a little dismaying, too, about Washington National Opera's season-opening production of "Tristan," one of its greatest efforts the company has made in the past dozen or so years.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 13, 2006
Myth-charged, elemental images bring Tristan & Isolde within hailing distance of real magic. Bereft knights send their moribund champion, Tristan (James Franco), across the sea amid bouquets of flaming arrows. A tremulous bride, Isolde (Sophia Myles), stands grimly upright in a boat as she glides on a river to a politically motivated marriage. Unfortunately, in the end, all you get are magic's distant echoes. Parts of this ultimate doomed-love story have an enjoyable sweep and thrust.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 28, 1999
The music of Richard Wagner's opera, "Tristan und Isolde," can affect you like a jingle; you can't get it out of your head. The difference is that it's not 60 seconds of harmless fluff. It's four hours of music, alternating between erotic yearning and erotic bliss, that continues to grind its gears in your ears long after it's over. Fortunate listeners get a persistent headache; less fortunate ones forget themselves and go mad.Performances of "Tristan" are rare. The current Washington Opera production, which opened last night at the Kennedy Center, is its first in almost 20 years.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2010
Eighth-grader Tristan Carmean of Millersville has something in common with players from some of the nation's greatest sports teams who have visited the White House to be celebrated for their accomplishments. But while the athletes were invited for their prowess on the playing field, Tristan, 12, a student at Chesapeake Science Point Charter School in Hanover, was honored for academics. Tristan was one of two dozen students invited to participate in the White House Science Fair, after representing the U.S. in a global math competition.
NEWS
December 28, 2003
On December 23, 2003, ALMA LAURER ALBERT; beloved wife of Gordon J. Albert; loving mother of Joan B. Arsenault and her husband Joel of Ashfield, MA, dear sister of George J. Laurer; grandmother of Tristan and Mackenzie Holly Arsenault. Friends may call from Noon to 1 PM on Tuesday in Our Lady of Angels Chapel in Charlestown, at which time services will take place. Interment in Loraine Park Cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 13, 1995
"Legends of the Fall" is soap opera for men.It's about legends in the mind of dreamy city boys who couldn't find the sky without a map that points up. It's full of junk, fundamentally a romantic yearning for the lost power of well-born white men (which it disguises by cloaking itself in political correctness) and other absurdist romantic conceits: poetic killers, loyal women with cheekbones like the Arch of Triumph, subservient but virtuous and wise Indians, handsome clothes straight out of those pretentious Ralph Lauren spreads in Vanity Fair, and that rarest of all birds, the good death.
NEWS
December 17, 2006
On December 1, 2006, BETTY WORKMAN, 82, of Pikesville; beloved wife and wonderful companion of Paul, married 64 years; cherished mother of Sharon and mother-in-law to Joe; devoted grandmother of Lynette, Laureen and Lissa; grandmother-in-law to Mike, Bobby and Jim. Also survived by four great-grandchildren, Curtis, Joshua, Tristan and Anastasia; sister to Minnie, Myra and the late Ruth, Irvin and Melvin; loving daughter of the late Molly and Benjamin....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
Celebrated soprano Deborah Voigt has withdrawn from Washington National Opera's season-opening production of Wagner's "Tristan und Isolde" a week before the first performance. She will be replaced by Ireene Theorin on Sept. 15, 18, 21, and 24, and by Alwyn Mellor for the final performance Sept. 27. Here's Voigt's statement, released by WNO: "Returning to a role that I love but haven't sung in a number of seasons, and encountering its unique challenges, has caused me to reconsider keeping it in my repertoire,.
EXPLORE
April 12, 2013
I live in Clemens Crossing and am fortunate enough to be able to walk to my Giant. So off I went tonight to get a couple bags of groceries. On my way I passed a Mom and three kids at the tot lot. The little boy called to me from high on the swing. He had just called safely and successfully to a stranger! And then I noticed the two little girls were thrilled because they had just spotted a frog in the creek. On I went to then have a fun discussion with a man I had never met about his beautiful Great Dane.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Jaskot, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Nicki Minaj wanted a cell phone case that matched her larger-than-life look - something cartoonish, with bright colors. So last year, the pop star turned to Tristan Herbert, a 23-year-old Parkville artist who makes custom covers for iPhones and Androids. Herbert spent 11 hours designing a case with a drawing of Minaj sporting long blonde hair, big hoop earrings, a belly shirt and blazer. The words "Pink Friday," the title of Minaj's first album, run alongside, and the background is, of course, pink.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra chose some of Richard Wagner's most radiant and involving music for a program this weekend to mark the composer's bicentennial year. The results were pretty radiant, too, Friday night at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, and will likely be even more so in the repeat performances, as things settle in more firmly. As a person, Wagner was deplorable - vain, arrogant, manipulative, viciously and relentlessly anti-Semitic. As an artist, he reached the highest peaks.
NEWS
By Amy Watts | April 24, 2012
They start the show with a ridiculous graphic of Gavin in his rowboat on the dance floor, getting overwhelmed by a giant wave. Oh, silly dancing show, it's fun when you have a little bit of a big budget. It's Motown night and one can only hope that they've managed to rescue 71-year-old Fontella Bass for a performance on Motown night. That song is absolutely on my "Desert Island Jukebox. " Oh, cool - they've got a  spotlight replica of the Motown logo on the dance floor. And we start off with a performance from Smokey Robinson, "Tracks of My Tears" while the troupe dances.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2010
Eighth-grader Tristan Carmean of Millersville has something in common with players from some of the nation's greatest sports teams who have visited the White House to be celebrated for their accomplishments. But while the athletes were invited for their prowess on the playing field, Tristan, 12, a student at Chesapeake Science Point Charter School in Hanover, was honored for academics. Tristan was one of two dozen students invited to participate in the White House Science Fair, after representing the U.S. in a global math competition.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | March 11, 1991
New Orleans.-- Tristan, my guru, spent all week trying to learn capitalism. He set up up a little business that sold rather weird but indispensable items like Invisibility Talisman, and Spell of Gold Fog, all priced inexpensively at between 25 cents and $400.His classmates went in for more conservative products: shoes, pizza, electronics. The class bought each other's stuff with money issued by the teacher and Tristan did pretty well. When you're 12 you need the Talisman of Invisibility. You can get shoes in the real world.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | September 14, 2008
Even though Tristan Wilds' performance as Michael Lee in seasons 4 and 5 of The Wire is probably one of my favorite things about the entire series, I can't quite bring myself to watch the reboot of 90210, which stars Wilds as Dixon Mills. In an interview, Wilds discusses the fact that the his character on 90210 is going to be a star lacrosse player. "[Lacrosse] encompasses the best of all sports," Wilds said. "Hockey, football, baseball, basketball." (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/lifeofkings)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
WASHINGTON - It's enough to give an actor whiplash, going from Michael Lee, the hardened, tragically street-smart Baltimore teen at the center of Season 4 of HBO's The Wire, to Dixon Wilson, adopted son of rich Beverly Hills parents on the CW's 90210. But Tristan Wilds shrugs it off as no big deal. Acting is something he's good at, and playing characters who seem polar opposites is just part of the deal. Besides, he says, Michael and Dixon aren't as dissimilar as they at first appear. "It's weird," says the 19-year-old actor, dressed all in black and sitting in a Georgetown hotel room.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | September 14, 2008
Even though Tristan Wilds' performance as Michael Lee in seasons 4 and 5 of The Wire is probably one of my favorite things about the entire series, I can't quite bring myself to watch the reboot of 90210, which stars Wilds as Dixon Mills. In an interview, Wilds discusses the fact that the his character on 90210 is going to be a star lacrosse player. "[Lacrosse] encompasses the best of all sports," Wilds said. "Hockey, football, baseball, basketball." (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/lifeofkings)
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