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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 24, 2003
The Cuckoo, set near the end of the Second World War, resembles one of those post-Civil War Westerns in which a Yank, a Rebel and a spunky pioneer woman form an unconventional union - except in this case, the soldiers are Finnish (Ville Haapasalo) and Russian (Viktor Bychkov), the earthy widow is a Lapp (Anni-Kristiina Juuso), and instead of gratifying action, we get a blast of Lapland mysticism that might have played better during the counterculture. The movie is satisfying only in bits and pieces; it's as flat and segmented as a triptych.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 10, 2005
Halfway through Passion Play, a cycle, a character remarks: "In Oberammergau, everything is as it appears to be." Oberammergau, Germany, is the site of the most famous continuing staging of the medieval, religious Passion play. That town, in 1934, is the setting for the second part of Sarah Ruhl's ambitious trilogy about war, religion, politics and prejudice. And, everything is definitely not "as it appears to be" - in Oberammergau (where the supposedly pious Passion play performers turn out to be Nazis)
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 7, 1991
Salvador Bru's paintings, at the C. Grimaldis Morton Street gallery (through April 13), look in some ways as if they could have been painted in the 1940s, when surrealism contributed to the birth of abstract expressionism.The biomorphic shapes that wander across paintings such as the huge (7 1/2 -by-30 feet) "Baltimore Triptych" are reminiscent of surrealism. One can think of Gorky, and here and there of Tanguy. These mix with other elements, some of which are specific enough to be named: a pyramid, for instance, which to Bru stands for knowledge or God.But what unifies these works and gives them their presence is their use of paint in abstract ways: the expression of mood and emotion through gesture and color, and the lyrical painterliness of individual passages, which at times become almost separate paintings within the painting, but still relate to the whole.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 24, 2003
The Cuckoo, set near the end of the Second World War, resembles one of those post-Civil War Westerns in which a Yank, a Rebel and a spunky pioneer woman form an unconventional union - except in this case, the soldiers are Finnish (Ville Haapasalo) and Russian (Viktor Bychkov), the earthy widow is a Lapp (Anni-Kristiina Juuso), and instead of gratifying action, we get a blast of Lapland mysticism that might have played better during the counterculture. The movie is satisfying only in bits and pieces; it's as flat and segmented as a triptych.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | March 31, 2002
If you're in a musical mood today, consider two free concerts on local campuses, both scheduled for the same time. * Roman Lebedev has chosen a colorful program for his piano recital -- short works by Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann and Chopin, complemented by Mussorgsky's virtuosic Pictures at an Exhibition. Lebedev, a professor at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, is a widely traveled soloist. He took part in an exchange program that brought him to Towson University in 1989 and eventually based himself in Baltimore, but he continues teaching in Russia as well.
NEWS
By William Tuohy and William Tuohy,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 1992
LONDON -- Francis Bacon, widely regarded as Britain's greatest contemporary painter, died of a heart attack in Madrid yesterday while visiting friends in Spain.The 82-year-old painter was highly controversial in traditional artistic circles because his powerful canvases, executed with splashing brush strokes, were often concerned with the themes of sex, suffering and death. Many regarded his paintings as obscene.But his work commanded high prices. A Bacon triptych recently sold in New York for $7 million.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | September 21, 1992
It's not surprising that Robert Llewellyn and Don Cook, who have exhibited together before, again share a show at the Nye Gomez Gallery. These artists are interested in schematic representations of, respectively, boats and buildings. Though distinctive in their styles, both tend to treat their rendered objects as pure geometric forms.Mr. Llewellyn, in an artist's statement, mentions the influence of the Chesapeake Bay on his work. His watercolors are anything but pretty representational pictures, however.
NEWS
By Sherie Posesorski | July 12, 1992
MY POOR ELEPHANT:27 MALE WRITERS AT WORK.Edited by Eve Shelnutt.Longstreet Press.416 pages. $21.95. I wasn't quite certain what I'd be reading while flipping through the essays in "My Poor Elephant: 27 Male Writers at Work." Would these selections by notable writers such as Lee K. Abbott, Madison Smartt Bell, Fred Chappell, Jack Matthews and Reginald McKnight be literary essays discussing influences and evolution of craft? Or were the essays philosophical reflections on the why of writing rather than the how?
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | December 15, 1992
Much new music nowadays seems to echo -- often with allusions and sometimes with direct quotations -- the music of the past. Fred Lerdahl's "Marches" for clarinet, violin, cello and piano is no exception.The work was commissioned by the Chamber Music Society of && Lincoln Center, performed by it at Lincoln Center in New York in its world premiere Sunday afternoon and repeated here last night at the Baltimore Museum of Art in a concert sponsored by the Chamber Music Society of Baltimore.This 15-minute piece refers to a number of famous marches -- one could identify allusions to the second movement of Schumann's Fantasy in C Major and to Mahler's Symphony No. 5 and try to capture snatches of Mozart and Shostakovich before they disappeared -- but that wasn't the point of the music.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 10, 2005
Halfway through Passion Play, a cycle, a character remarks: "In Oberammergau, everything is as it appears to be." Oberammergau, Germany, is the site of the most famous continuing staging of the medieval, religious Passion play. That town, in 1934, is the setting for the second part of Sarah Ruhl's ambitious trilogy about war, religion, politics and prejudice. And, everything is definitely not "as it appears to be" - in Oberammergau (where the supposedly pious Passion play performers turn out to be Nazis)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | March 31, 2002
If you're in a musical mood today, consider two free concerts on local campuses, both scheduled for the same time. * Roman Lebedev has chosen a colorful program for his piano recital -- short works by Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann and Chopin, complemented by Mussorgsky's virtuosic Pictures at an Exhibition. Lebedev, a professor at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, is a widely traveled soloist. He took part in an exchange program that brought him to Towson University in 1989 and eventually based himself in Baltimore, but he continues teaching in Russia as well.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | December 15, 1992
Much new music nowadays seems to echo -- often with allusions and sometimes with direct quotations -- the music of the past. Fred Lerdahl's "Marches" for clarinet, violin, cello and piano is no exception.The work was commissioned by the Chamber Music Society of && Lincoln Center, performed by it at Lincoln Center in New York in its world premiere Sunday afternoon and repeated here last night at the Baltimore Museum of Art in a concert sponsored by the Chamber Music Society of Baltimore.This 15-minute piece refers to a number of famous marches -- one could identify allusions to the second movement of Schumann's Fantasy in C Major and to Mahler's Symphony No. 5 and try to capture snatches of Mozart and Shostakovich before they disappeared -- but that wasn't the point of the music.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | September 21, 1992
It's not surprising that Robert Llewellyn and Don Cook, who have exhibited together before, again share a show at the Nye Gomez Gallery. These artists are interested in schematic representations of, respectively, boats and buildings. Though distinctive in their styles, both tend to treat their rendered objects as pure geometric forms.Mr. Llewellyn, in an artist's statement, mentions the influence of the Chesapeake Bay on his work. His watercolors are anything but pretty representational pictures, however.
NEWS
By Sherie Posesorski | July 12, 1992
MY POOR ELEPHANT:27 MALE WRITERS AT WORK.Edited by Eve Shelnutt.Longstreet Press.416 pages. $21.95. I wasn't quite certain what I'd be reading while flipping through the essays in "My Poor Elephant: 27 Male Writers at Work." Would these selections by notable writers such as Lee K. Abbott, Madison Smartt Bell, Fred Chappell, Jack Matthews and Reginald McKnight be literary essays discussing influences and evolution of craft? Or were the essays philosophical reflections on the why of writing rather than the how?
NEWS
By William Tuohy and William Tuohy,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 1992
LONDON -- Francis Bacon, widely regarded as Britain's greatest contemporary painter, died of a heart attack in Madrid yesterday while visiting friends in Spain.The 82-year-old painter was highly controversial in traditional artistic circles because his powerful canvases, executed with splashing brush strokes, were often concerned with the themes of sex, suffering and death. Many regarded his paintings as obscene.But his work commanded high prices. A Bacon triptych recently sold in New York for $7 million.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 7, 1991
Salvador Bru's paintings, at the C. Grimaldis Morton Street gallery (through April 13), look in some ways as if they could have been painted in the 1940s, when surrealism contributed to the birth of abstract expressionism.The biomorphic shapes that wander across paintings such as the huge (7 1/2 -by-30 feet) "Baltimore Triptych" are reminiscent of surrealism. One can think of Gorky, and here and there of Tanguy. These mix with other elements, some of which are specific enough to be named: a pyramid, for instance, which to Bru stands for knowledge or God.But what unifies these works and gives them their presence is their use of paint in abstract ways: the expression of mood and emotion through gesture and color, and the lyrical painterliness of individual passages, which at times become almost separate paintings within the painting, but still relate to the whole.
FEATURES
January 8, 1993
Here is a list of nominees for some categories for the 35th annual Grammy Awards announced yesterday.1. Record of the Year: "Tears In Heaven," Eric Clapton; "Achy Breaky Heart," Billy Ray Cyrus; "Constant Craving," k.d. lang; "Save the Best for Last," Vanessa Williams; "Beauty and the Beast," Celine Dion and Peabo Bryson.2. Album of the Year: "Unplugged," Eric Clapton; "Ingenue," k.d. lang; "Diva," Annie Lennox; "Achtung Baby," U2; "Beauty and the Beast," various artists.3. Song of the Year: "Tears in Heaven," Eric Clapton; "Achy Breaky Heart," Billy Ray Cyrus; "Beauty and the Beast," Celine Dion and Peabo Bryson; "Constant Craving," k.d. lang; "Save the Best for Last," Vanessa Williams.
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