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NEWS
August 23, 2011
How appropriate the front page photo shows a joyous Libyan rebel in American battle dress uniform ("Rebels in Tripoli" Aug. 22). Glad he's so happy. As a taxpayer I'm sickened to realize once again our dollars (billions of them) have been squandered in another unnecessary war. So I guess now we can look forward to the executions of Moammar Gadhafi, his son and other family members. Where does our Constitution mandate America must police the world? While NATO will claim honors for the Libyan rebel victory, everyone knows it was the United States that did the heavy lifting.
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NEWS
May 7, 2014
I applaud your editorial, "The local religion" (May 6). The Supreme Court's decision to allow sectarian prayers at local meetings is wrong, and the argument that the inclusion of prayers rests on "long-standing American tradition" is specious. Perhaps the members of the Supreme Court and all Americans need to reacquaint themselves with the Treaty of Tripoli written by John Adams and ratified unanimously by Congress in 1797. This document states categorically that "the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion.
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NEWS
March 2, 2011
When the Pasha of Tripoli authorized Barbary pirates to hold ships and crews of the infant United States for ransom in the early nineteenth century, President Thomas Jefferson responded by ordering the U.S. Navy to shell his capital, then he sent in the Marines. However, that may not be the wisest course for the U.S. regarding the current situation in Libya, where the aging dictator Moammar Gadhafi is locked in a desperate bid to retain power in the face of an armed popular uprising.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Returning from a religious service (let's omit the denomination), I described it to my college roommate, who asked, "Why do those people bother to be there? What's their purpose?" I answered, "I believe that their purpose is to mean well . "  I have the same reaction to most public prayer at secular occasions: little anodyne sentiments that appear to do little to establish comity and civility. Wouldn't mind dispensing with dragging God into zoning disputes and school boundaries.  But then there are those who want their public prayer full-blooded, invoking not only God but insisting that Jesus participate in the proceedings.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
1804: John Ridgely's travails on the shores of Tripoli It was 201 years ago that a military surgeon from Annapolis turned his capture off the Barbary Coast into a friendship with an African ruler. On October 31, 1804, the frigate Philadelphia was captured in the harbor of Tripoli. When John Ridgely of Annapolis, the surgeon on the vessel, was taken to Tripoli with other prisoners, he was commanded under penalty of death to cure the sick daughter of the ruler - or Bey - of the Barbary Coast metropolis.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 14, 2008
TRIPOLI, Lebanon - A bomb hidden in a briefcase tore through a bus packed with Lebanese soldiers on their way to work yesterday morning, killing 15 people, including nine soldiers, and wounding more than 40 people. The bombing overshadowed news from Damascus that Syria and Lebanon would establish diplomatic relations for the first time since each country achieved independence from France in the 1940s. The announcement, at the start of a fence-mending mission by President Michel Suleiman of Lebanon, did not say when the countries would exchange ambassadors.
NEWS
By Joseph Wheelan | October 19, 2003
POSTWAR IRAQ, which these days evokes strained comparisons to late 1960s Vietnam, might be more usefully compared with the Barbary War of 1801-1805, a forgotten conflict with lessons to impart. Fought 200 years ago, the Barbary War was America's only unilateral war against a Muslim foe. It was begun with high hopes that soon began to ebb. By 1803, the U.S. naval offensive appeared becalmed, a squadron commander had been recalled and President Thomas Jefferson and his officials were debating what to do next.
NEWS
By Raed Rafei and Raed Rafei,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2007
TRIPOLI, Lebanon -- The cleric's question echoed off the walls of the mosque in one of Tripoli's poorest neighborhoods - and well beyond. "What is happening to our community?" Sheik Mazen Mohammed cried. "Where are we heading?" Many of Lebanon's Sunni Muslims, especially in the northern part of the country, are asking themselves the same question Mohammed posed during prayers on a recent Friday. The Sunni community has been fractured by a battle between the country's army and an extremist Sunni group inspired by al-Qaida, and an ensuing crackdown by the government against Islamists.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 25, 2007
TRIPOLI, Lebanon -- A bomb ripped through a United Nations convoy in southern Lebanon yesterday, killing six peacekeepers under Spanish command. The attack, which took place on a day when the Lebanese military fought a battle against Sunni Muslim radicals in the north, heightened fears that a second front might have opened in the fight against militants linked to al-Qaida. The attacks on opposite ends of the country could stretch the Lebanese army further and weaken a country already beset by sectarian tension, political stalemate and a worsening economic crisis.
NEWS
October 7, 2012
FBI investigators still have not been granted permission to visit the consulate building where the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans were killed three weeks ago during an attack by Libyan militants in the eastern city of Benghazi. An FBI team was dispatched to Libya within days of the attack, but they have been forced to remain in Tripoli as U.S. and Libyan officials argue over the terms under which the two sides will co-operate in the investigation. Why is there such a undue delay for there FBI to find out exactly what happened?
NEWS
October 7, 2012
FBI investigators still have not been granted permission to visit the consulate building where the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans were killed three weeks ago during an attack by Libyan militants in the eastern city of Benghazi. An FBI team was dispatched to Libya within days of the attack, but they have been forced to remain in Tripoli as U.S. and Libyan officials argue over the terms under which the two sides will co-operate in the investigation. Why is there such a undue delay for there FBI to find out exactly what happened?
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
For the American sailors off Tripoli - five of them from Maryland - it was a suicide mission: Sail the small ship heavy with explosives in among the enemy fleet, set the blast to go off in 15 minutes, jump into lifeboats and get as far away as possible. The crew of the Intrepid would never make it. The fireship ignited early, killing all 13 men aboard. The bodies washed ashore, to be fed on by dogs and dragged through the streets of Tripoli. They eventually would be buried in a pair of sites.
NEWS
September 1, 2011
With life slowly returning to normal in Tripoli after rebels broke the grip of government forces there last week, the decisions now being made by the National Transition Council will play a key role in determining how Libya's revolution unfolds. Former Libyan strongman Muammar Gadhafi apparently is on the run, but he remains a dangerous threat to the fledgling government. Meanwhile, tribal and regional divisions that have emerged among the various rebel factions in recent days could complicate efforts to unify the country even after the fighting ends.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Matthew VanDyke, the Baltimore man who went missing in Libya more than five months ago, re-emerged in Tripoli on Wednesday and told his family that he had been held captive by Moammar Gadhafi's government in one of the country's most notorious prisons. The 32-year-old VanDyke, who traveled to Libya in March to witness the then-fledging revolution for a book he is writing about the region, borrowed a cellphone and called his mother Wednesday afternoon. It was Sharon VanDyke's first contact with her son since he sent GPS coordinates March 13 that placed him near Brega.
NEWS
August 23, 2011
How appropriate the front page photo shows a joyous Libyan rebel in American battle dress uniform ("Rebels in Tripoli" Aug. 22). Glad he's so happy. As a taxpayer I'm sickened to realize once again our dollars (billions of them) have been squandered in another unnecessary war. So I guess now we can look forward to the executions of Moammar Gadhafi, his son and other family members. Where does our Constitution mandate America must police the world? While NATO will claim honors for the Libyan rebel victory, everyone knows it was the United States that did the heavy lifting.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
Sharon VanDyke's phone rang Monday afternoon, but after quickly dispensing with the call, she said, sadly, "Well, it wasn't Matthew. " The wait continues for the retired principal, who has searched for the past five months for her son, a 32-year-old writer and photographer who went to Libya to chronicle the uprising against Moammar Gadhafi but is believed to have been imprisoned with rebel forces. Now, with those insurgents on the brink of toppling Gadhafi, VanDyke is bracing for whatever that means for her son. "I've been more worried in the last 24 to 48 hours than ever," she said Monday, after a mostly sleepless several days of monitoring the events in Libya from her South Baltimore rowhouse.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
I applaud your editorial, "The local religion" (May 6). The Supreme Court's decision to allow sectarian prayers at local meetings is wrong, and the argument that the inclusion of prayers rests on "long-standing American tradition" is specious. Perhaps the members of the Supreme Court and all Americans need to reacquaint themselves with the Treaty of Tripoli written by John Adams and ratified unanimously by Congress in 1797. This document states categorically that "the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | August 1, 2004
Inshallah" means "God willing" in Arabic. It's good to know if you visit Libya, this Muslim country on the north coast of Africa, now open to Americans after 20 years of U.S. sanctions. The thaw in relations cracks open a tantalizingly closed door. On the other side are such marvels of the ancient world as the ruins of Sabratha and Leptis Magna; the vibrant capital city of Tripoli, poised between dilapidation and rehabilitation; 1,250 miles of Mediterranean coast; oasis towns still visited by camel caravans; and the intelligent, self-sure Libyan people, who met me with eager curiosity on my visit in late April and early May. Best of all, Libya, like China in the 1970s, remains largely untouched by the despoiling hand of commercial tourism.
NEWS
August 22, 2011
Col. Moammar Gadhafi's 42-year misrule of the oil-rich African nation of Libya appears finally to be nearing an end. The rebels' surprisingly swift advance into the capital, Tripoli, over the weekend brought large parts of the government's last remaining stronghold under their control, with only isolated pockets of resistance around Mr. Gadhafi's fortified compound. Barring any unforeseen reversal of fortunes, a total military collapse of the regime could occur imminently. These events have heartened the rebel groups that have been battling the dictator over the last six months of often inconclusive fighting, which likely would have ended quite differently without NATO airstrikes on Mr. Gadhafi's forces and Western military training and equipment.
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