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By Gene Wang, The Washington Post | November 12, 2010
Top-ranked Oregon hasn't done it. Neither has No.2 Auburn or No.3 Texas Christian. Even fourth-ranked Boise State, the No. 2-rated scoring offense in the land, hasn't come close. The it in this case is scoring 76 points, which Navy hung on East Carolina in a victory Saturday that qualified the Midshipmen for a bowl game. Navy's scoring spree was a singular accomplishment, setting it apart from some of the most recognized programs in the country and validating the triple option as an offense that can compile points as prodigiously as any spread or run-and-shoot.
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By Jon Blau, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Indiana did all it could to embrace the Navy tradition before the Hoosiers and Midshipmen kicked off Saturday night. A prow from the U.S.S. Indiana had been installed in front of Memorial Stadium, dedicated in a pregame ceremony at which Indiana's president, the state's two senators and its congressman did their best to brag on the their naval prowess with the Secretary of the Navy in attendance. Twenty veterans of the World War II-era warship were given a standing ovation, as Sen. Joe Donnelly said it was only because of them that this game could be played.
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SPORTS
By The Washington Post | September 24, 2010
By Gene Wang In the first half of Saturday night's game at Louisiana Tech, Navy's triple option offense was having only mixed success, and the Midshipmen were in danger of losing for the second time in three games. Complicating Navy's problems was quarterback Ricky Dobbs's bum ankle, which he had hurt in the team's opener against Maryland on Labor Day and aggravated the following game, and the absences of the starting right tackle and free safety because of concussions. Given the troubling circumstances, the first drive of the second half may prove to have been the most meaningful so far this season for the Midshipmen.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
As last Friday's game at Central Michigan unfolded for the Navy football team, one thing became abundantly clear: With freshman quarterback Keenan Reynolds running the offense, the Midshipmen began to resemble the teams from Ken Niumatalolo's first three seasons as head coach and Paul Johnson's last five years in Annapolis. It was not only the first time that Navy had dominated a Football Bowl Subdivision opponent both in terms of the scoreboard (31-13) and time of possession (35:47 to 24:13)
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
Paul Johnson had grown tired of the question. It was 2008, and the former Navy coach — entering his first season at Georgia Tech — was repeatedly asked by the media whether the option-based offense he ran so successfully at Navy would translate in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Johnson folded his arms and exhaled. "I get a kick out of, 'Will this work on this level?' he said. "I'm like, 'Are we playing the NFC East?' Last I looked, the last six years at Navy, we were playing Division I teams.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | October 18, 2008
Jarod Bryant has been on the field for Navy significantly more than Kaipo-Noa Kaheaku-Enhada this season, starting three games and playing more than a half in two others, mostly because of a recurring hamstring injury to his fellow senior quarterback. Bryant will make his fourth start overall and third straight when the 4-2 Midshipmen take a three-game winning streak into Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium today against No. 23 Pittsburgh (4-1). Navy's recent stretch that includes road wins over then-No.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun Reporter | September 3, 2006
Minutes after finishing his first collegiate start, Navy senior quarterback Brian Hampton looked weary and sounded displeased with his performance. Never mind that Hampton had rushed 34 times for 149 yards, the most by a Navy quarterback in nearly two years. Never mind that Hampton had spearheaded the Midshipmen's triple option in a hard-earned, 28-23 victory over East Carolina, in the season opener for both teams before 33,809 at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium last night. Massachusetts @Navy Saturday 1:30 p.m., Navy Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, 1050 AM, 1370 AM, 1430 AM
SPORTS
By Camille Powell and The Washington Post | December 11, 2009
Whenever he gets the chance, Army coach Rich Ellerson watches the football teams from Navy and Georgia Tech on television. He does so partly because of his long-standing friendships with those teams' coaches, Ken Niumatalolo and Paul Johnson. But Ellerson is also curious; his team, like Niumatalolo's and Johnson's, employs the triple-option offense. "We try to see what kind of answers people are coming up with [to defend it] along the way," said Ellerson, who's in his first season as Army's head coach.
SPORTS
October 23, 2009
Rutgers@Army 8 p.m. [ESPN2] Ready for some Friday Knight football? Scarlet Knights vs. Black Knights, that is. This series dates to 1891, but it could be decided by kids who weren't born until roughly a century later. Two of the nation's six true freshmen who serve as their team's primary starters at quarterback will be on display. Rutgers' Tom Savage is fourth among true freshman quarterbacks nationally with 941 passing yards, and Trent Steelman, at right in photo at left, leads true freshman QBs with 407 rushing yards in Army's triple-option offense.
SPORTS
By Tribune Newspapers | December 26, 2010
Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force (8-4) When: Monday, 5 p.m. Where: Shreveport, La. TV: ESPN2 About Georgia Tech (4-4 ACC): As usual, the Yellow Jackets had no trouble using their triple-option offense to pile up gaudy rushing statistics. Georgia Tech led the nation with 327 rushing yards per game. But the Yellow Jackets struggled to stop opposing offenses, especially down the stretch. Four of Georgia Tech's final five opponents — Duke was the lone exception — scored at least 27 points.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
Chris Culton has been an assistant coach at Navy for a decade, working with the team's fullbacks his first five years and the offensive line the last five. Given the importance of those two positions in Navy's triple-option offense, it is fair to say that Culton has played a significant role in the program's success. Which is why Culton, like many involved with the Midshipmen these days, is trying to reverse what has become a disturbing and downward trend this season - an inability for a rushing offense typically ranked near the top of the Football Bowl Subdivision to muster any consistency.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
John Howell was at the Naval Academy for several months before he ever heard Gee Gee Greene utter more than a few words. In the weight room at Ricketts Hall, on the practice fields and even when the football team was eating its meals, Greene said little to his fellow freshman or anyone else. "I remember when we came over for Plebe Summer [before freshman year], we sat down to get food. Gee Gee would just sit there and keep to himself, or he would just sit with Tra'ves [Bush]," Howell, now a senior, said of Greene.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2011
There were 19 players at Navy basketball practice Monday, nearly half of them freshmen and only two, senior guard Jordan Sugars and sophomore forward J.J. Avila, who started for the Midshipmen last season. Yet new coach Ed DeChellis sees potential depth where there's inexperience as he enters his first season in Annapolis. "You're evaluated by four or five coaches [watching] tape every day," DeChellis said during the team's Media Day at Alumni Hall. "We'll have to narrow some things down and that doesn't mean where you start now is where you're going to finish.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
Paul Johnson had grown tired of the question. It was 2008, and the former Navy coach — entering his first season at Georgia Tech — was repeatedly asked by the media whether the option-based offense he ran so successfully at Navy would translate in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Johnson folded his arms and exhaled. "I get a kick out of, 'Will this work on this level?' he said. "I'm like, 'Are we playing the NFC East?' Last I looked, the last six years at Navy, we were playing Division I teams.
SPORTS
By Tribune Newspapers | December 26, 2010
Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force (8-4) When: Monday, 5 p.m. Where: Shreveport, La. TV: ESPN2 About Georgia Tech (4-4 ACC): As usual, the Yellow Jackets had no trouble using their triple-option offense to pile up gaudy rushing statistics. Georgia Tech led the nation with 327 rushing yards per game. But the Yellow Jackets struggled to stop opposing offenses, especially down the stretch. Four of Georgia Tech's final five opponents — Duke was the lone exception — scored at least 27 points.
SPORTS
By Gene Wang, The Washington Post | November 19, 2010
In his first start this season and the third in his Navy football career, junior quarterback Kriss Proctor directed the triple option Saturday as if the intricacies of the offense happened to have been designed with him specifically in mind. He dipped and dodged his way to 201 rushing yards, was virtually flawless in his decisions to pitch or keep the ball and had Central Michigan defenders often grasping at air in leading the Midshipmen to a thrilling 38-37 victory. In many cases, that dazzling performance would have provided more than enough evidence to convince coaches that Proctor should be the starter again.
SPORTS
By Gene Wang, The Washington Post | August 25, 2010
The attention paid to Navy's triple-option offense rarely reaches beyond one player, that being Ricky Dobbs. Forget about an equitable distribution of recognition, at least outside the locker room. That's just how it goes after the senior set an NCAA record for most rushing touchdowns in a season by a quarterback and steered Navy to 10 wins and an authoritative victory in the Texas Bowl. Yet ask Dobbs about those accomplishments, and he immediately redirects credit to the group responsible for keeping him out of harm's way: the offensive line.
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