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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | December 5, 1993
Look for the Triple Crown races to adopt the same stringent pre-race veterinary procedures that the Breeders' Cup instituted this year at Santa Anita Park.During race week, a team of veterinarians performed thorough daily examinations of all the horses in order to help insure there would be no catastrophic breakdowns on race day.There was grumbling from some trainers, but no one can argue with the results. The races went off without a hitch, there were no serious injuries and no grisly television pictures of a Union City or Prairie Bayou being carted off the track in a horse ambulance, incidents that marred the 1993 Triple Crown.
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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Linda Rice had tried college, lasting a couple of years at Penn State while realizing that studying bloodlines, speed ratings and past performance charts for horses interested her far more than what she was studying in computer science classes. "I knew my future was somewhere else," she said. Rice returned to the family farm near Harrisburg, Pa., and went back to the life she knew growing up, when she worked with her father, Clyde, a successful trainer, her mother, Jean, and her three brothers on horse farms in Wisconsin, West Virginia and Pennsylvania.
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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1997
Traitor, one of Maryland's hopes for glory in the Kentucky Derby or Preakness, was removed from the Triple Crown trail yesterday after showing signs of wear and tear from his demanding schedule.Mary Eppler, the colt's Pimlico-based trainer, said that, after discussions with the horse's owner, Alfred G. Vanderbilt, they have decided to give Traitor time off instead of pushing him toward the spring classics. He was to have raced Saturday in the Wood Memorial at Aqueduct."He will not run in the Wood or any of the Triple Crown races," Eppler said.
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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
He kept coming back, year after year, horse after horse, trying to get another victory in the Preakness Stakes before he was done. Going into the 138th running of the Triple Crown's middle leg, D. Wayne Lukas had tried eight times since Charismatic won at Pimlico Race Course in 1999 - with 12 different entries. The best any of his horses could do was third place - twice - with Proud Citizen in 2002 and Scrimshaw in 2003. But as the 77-year-old Hall of Fame trainer pointed out after 15-1 shot Oxbow took the lead nearly out of the gates and held off Itsmyluckyday by 1 ¾ lengths to give Lukas his sixth victory in the Preakness, even winning a record 14th Triple Crown race was not going to change his career plans.
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By Dale Austin and Dale Austin,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 26, 1990
LAUREL -- Long after the Triple Crown races that trainer Carlos Garcia had eyed hopefully, Super Cholo finally won a race as a 3-year-old yesterday.The triumph came at Laurel Race Course in the $54,825 Annapolis Handicap, at the expense of heavily favored Chas' Whim, who ran fourth, and second choice Country Day, who struggled in next to last in a seven-horse race.With Marco Castaneda aboard, Super Cholo dropped back to fifth on the final turn, then rallied to win by a nose over Temper Time.
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By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
As the man responsible for rebuilding Sagamore Farm shook hands with the son of the man who oversaw its halcyon days, Tiger Walk stood stoically in his stall. The other horses in the barn had long since poked their heads out in response to commotion created by television crews and a small gathering of reporters. Tiger Walk faced the other way, looking out his window. Kevin Plank, the Under Armour founder and CEO who bought Sagamore Farm in 2007, hopes Tiger Walk can remain unflappable.
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By Bill Tanton | June 15, 1993
You don't have to be a horseman all your life, as 70-year-old former U.S. Senator Daniel B. Brewster has been, to know the answer.Neither do you have to be as well-traveled as ABC-TV's Jim McKay -- and McKay, in addition to broadcasting Triple Crown races for many years, owns a small Maryland stable of thoroughbreds.And you don't have to be a seasoned track official like Lenny Hale, the Maryland Jockey Club's president for racing, to be able to explain the tragic injuries that resulted in the humane destroying of Union City and Prairie Bayou in this year's Preakness and Belmont Stakes, respectively.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
Michael Phelps could very well become the greatest Olympian of all time but he says when he retires from swimming after the London Games, he plans to conquer a new sport: Horse racing. Phelps tells Yahoo that he's quite serious about buying a race horse with his longtime coach Bob Bowman. He tells the news organization that the two have discussed it repeatedly. In fact, he has his eye on Preakness 2014 -- if not the Triple Crown. "I think it would be cool," Phelps told Yahoo, adding that he hopes to hit all of next year's Triple Crown races as an observer, if not a shopper.
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By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | May 16, 1992
Pimlico is generally a pretty casual place. But there will be a decidedly upscale look today in the corporate tent village in the Pimlico infield.Some 3,000 invited guests of various corporations will be roaming the village, dining on everything from Chesapeake Bay crab cakes with a lemon caper tartar sauce to jeweled fruit tarts and rum balls.Eighteen corporations and organizations are sponsoring tents in the village, which is fenced off and features its own posh portable bathrooms, betting windows and entertainment.
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By Maryjean Wall and Maryjean Wall,Knight-Ridder | June 7, 1991
ELMONT, N.Y. -- The $695,800 Belmont Stakes tomorrow has the Kentucky Derby and Preakness winners in a rematch and nearly had the winner of the Kentucky Oaks for fillies, too.But there aren't a whole lot of fireworks going off as this third and final race in the Triple Crown series builds to an almost anticlimactic climax."
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By Allan Vought, Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 15, 2013
D. Wayne Lukas, the Hall of Fame trainer, has started 37 horses in the Preakness. He expects to have three more - Will Take Charge, Oxbow and Titletown Five - go to the post Saturday for the 138th running of the middle jewel of the Triple Crown. Does Lukas like Pimlico? Indeed he does. "I do like it here. We've only missed two, maybe only one in the last 33 years," Lukas said as he waited to accompany one of his horses to the track Wednesday morning. Standing just outside the stakes barn, Lukas was outfitted in his usual jeans, chaps, boots and spurs and a 10-gallon hat. Waiting patiently nearby was his stable pony Diamond, a reminder that while Lukas may have revolutionized the sport of horse racing with some of his methods, he's still a throwback when it comes to others.
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By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
When his first Kentucky Derby horse, Orb, was named the favorite Wednesday, Stuart S. Janney the III was not there to raise his hands triumphantly for the cameras. He won't be in Louisville at all in the days leading to the race. A short phone call with his trainer each day is all the northern Baltimore County resident requires. The rest, he'd rather avoid. "There's a lot of silliness that happens this week," he said Monday. "And I've got paperwork to catch up on. " Janney is instead in New York, where he spends much of his time at the 5th Avenue headquarters of the Bessemer Trust, the wealth management firm of which he is the chairman.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | January 10, 2013
Under Armour founder and CEO Kevin Plank has aggressively marketed his company from the beginning, unabashedly challenging established titans like Nike, Adidas and Reebok. A man who often speaks in sports-centric slogans, it can appear at times that he runs his primary business with the fury of a soon-to-retire linebacker facing playoff elimination. But in his secondary pursuit, Plank has shown patience in a sport that, by nature, often destroys it. He has owned Sagamore Farm for seven years, rebuilding it gradually and allowing manager Tom Mullikan - an old high school buddy and football teammate - to methodically put together a breeding, training and racing program.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
Michael Phelps could very well become the greatest Olympian of all time but he says when he retires from swimming after the London Games, he plans to conquer a new sport: Horse racing. Phelps tells Yahoo that he's quite serious about buying a race horse with his longtime coach Bob Bowman. He tells the news organization that the two have discussed it repeatedly. In fact, he has his eye on Preakness 2014 -- if not the Triple Crown. "I think it would be cool," Phelps told Yahoo, adding that he hopes to hit all of next year's Triple Crown races as an observer, if not a shopper.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
- Now, he's the burgeoning star with a sly smile on his face and steady answer to every question, even as the weight of racing history should be pressing upon him. But when Glen Todd first met Mario Gutierrez six years ago, the owner and jockey communicated through "a sort of sign language and pointing. " "He was shy, in a totally new place, and very embarrassed about not speaking English," said Todd, the top owner of thoroughbred horses in Western Canada. "And he was very tough on himself.
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By Jeff Barker and Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Mike Smith appeared dazed in the moments after his horse, Bodemeister, was again beaten by Kentucky Derby winner I'll Have Another - this time by a neck in Saturday's Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Course . The veteran jockey wore the frozen smile of a man hardly able to fathom what had just transpired. "I swear I don't know how he ran me down, man," Smith said after trainer Bob Baffert approached in the fading sunlight. "You did a good job," the 59-year-old trainer told the 46-year-old jockey, a fellow Hall of Famer and former Preakness winner who recently passed 5,000 career victories.
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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1994
Bring back the bonus!That's the sentiment around Pimlico Race Course since connections to three of the main Kentucky Derby contenders -- runner-up Strodes Creek, fourth-place finisher Brocco and beaten favorite Holy Bull -- announced their horses would skip Saturday's Preakness Stakes to run in the Belmont.The trainers all want more than two weeks for their horses to recover from the strain of the Derby.Who can blame them?Now that the Chrysler Corp. has dropped the $1 million bonus that rewarded the horse accumulating the most points in the three-race series, a huge incentive to participate in all of the Triple Crown races has been eliminated.
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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1997
Pulpit grasps for stardom and Captain Bodgit for credibility, as the most competitive Triple Crown preview so far this year, the $200,000 Fountain of Youth Stakes, unfolds today at Gulfstream Park.Racing's newest sensation, Pulpit, tests his lightning-fast speed against the grit and experience of several of the top 3-year-olds in the East.Among them is Captain Bodgit, trained by Gary Capuano and based at Bowie but working this winter in southern Florida.The 1 1/16-mile race for Kentucky Derby and Preakness aspirants will be televised on ESPN.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
Over the past year, slots money has injected energy into Maryland horse racing. Revenue from the state's two casinos has bolstered purses, helping attract better horses and create more competitive races. The Preakness also is benefiting. Some of the weekend's undercard stakes races offer larger prizes, while the long-respected Pimlico Special returns with a $300,000 purse after disappearing for three years due to a lack of prize money. It's shaping up to be a good running for the Preakness this year.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
As the man responsible for rebuilding Sagamore Farm shook hands with the son of the man who oversaw its halcyon days, Tiger Walk stood stoically in his stall. The other horses in the barn had long since poked their heads out in response to commotion created by television crews and a small gathering of reporters. Tiger Walk faced the other way, looking out his window. Kevin Plank, the Under Armour founder and CEO who bought Sagamore Farm in 2007, hopes Tiger Walk can remain unflappable.
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