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By PHIL HERSH and PHIL HERSH,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 18, 2005
PORTLAND, Ore. - Writing about the 2006 Olympic hopes of 15-year-old Kimmie Meissner in September, when few outside of Meissner's Bel Air neighborhood knew the talented figure skater's name, I noted that new rules could hurt her chances to be an Olympic star as fast as the last two gold medalists. Because she does not meet the age requirement imposed in 1999 for the senior world meet, Meissner will go into the Olympic year without the experience Tara Lipinski had before winning the 1998 gold at 15 and Sarah Hughes had before winning the 2002 gold at 16. Lipinski skated in two senior worlds before the Olympics; Hughes, three.
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By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,Tribune Newspapers | January 18, 2010
SPOKANE, Wash. - - The two men who have been in an Olympics, Evan Lysacek and Johnny Weir, shared both mixed feelings about their flawed performances Sunday and the hope the best will come a month from now in Vancouver. The man going to his first Winter Games, Jeremy Abbott, might find it hard to top what he did. And he might not need to, for Abbott's free skate was such a tour de force that it not only turned an expected close competition into a rout, but it also was easily good enough to win an Olympic medal - even the gold.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2005
PORTLAND, Ore. - Michelle Kwan's cosmic connection to the past is complete. The most decorated woman in U.S. figure skating history added a record-tying ninth national title to her resume last night before an adoring crowd eager to shower her with thunderous applause. Sasha Cohen, who has played bridesmaid three times to Kwan, did so again. But Kwan's magic moment was almost overshadowed by Bel Air's Kimmie Meissner, who finished third and landed the first triple axel by a U.S. woman since Tonya Harding performed one in the fall of 1991.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | January 19, 2009
A hip injury has forced 2006 world and 2007 national champion Kimmie Meissner to withdraw from this week's U.S. Figure Skating Championships in Cleveland. Meissner, who grew up in Bel Air but trains in Florida, said she hurt her right hip while running on a treadmill a week ago and reinjured it Friday while landing a jump. "It was starting to feel better, but then I had a weird landing on a lutz. Then it felt worse, way worse," she said. "Even walking was bad." She flew home to Maryland to work with physical therapists and sports trainers in an attempt to be ready for the women's short program Thursday evening, but it became clear the injury needed a week or two of rest.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | October 27, 2006
Meissner set to jump-start season HARTFORD, Conn.-- --Last year, in her first season on the elite international circuit, Kimmie Meissner wanted her on-ice performances to show maturity. This year, having just turned 17, the reigning world champion is looking for "emotion and attitude," not to mention relocating the jump that made her famous in 2005. Meissner's new long program, skated to spirited Spanish guitar music, has passion and seven triple jumps, including the triple axel. It's the jump that sets her apart from other U.S. women, but is the staple of her rival, Japanese teen sensation Mao Asada.
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By Sal Zanca and Sal Zanca,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 2004
HELSINKI, Finland - At this time last year, skating in her f irst International Skating Union Junior Grand Prix final, Kimmie Meissner was in awe. Barely 14, just out of novice competition, lacking experience, she was amazed at the other skaters' jumping ability, such as that of future champion Miki Ando of Japan, who could do a quadruple jump. Now, a year later, the Bel Air resident is a veteran at 15 as she enters her second Junior Grand Prix final. She added the national junior title to her novice championship - one of the rare skaters to win both back-to-back - she made an impressive senior debut in the invitational Campbell's Classic in October against the likes of Michelle Kwan and Sasha Cohen and won the silver medal at the junior worlds in March in The Hague, Netherlands, though one of the youngest competitors.
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By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
After a season that included winning the world figure skating championship and finishing sixth at the Olympics, Kimmie Meissner is ready to start over. Next week, the Bel Air teenager will start working on new routines that judges and fans will see when she begins her second year on the Grand Prix circuit. Despite jumping from novice level to world's best in three years, Meissner harbors no illusions that she has it made. "I'm going to approach this year the way I did last year and the year before," said Meissner, whose first event is likely to be in late October at Skate America, the season's first Grand Prix event.
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By Jere Longman and Jere Longman,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 22, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- As she skated from the rink at the Olympic Ice Hall, Tonya Harding looked at her coach, Dody Teachman, and said with relief and disappointment, "Oh, well."Her year has gone that way. She left and reconciled with her husband. She fell out with and made up with her coach. Her troubled life story -- broken home, mother who has been married six times -- was printed in newspapers and magazines from one coast to the other.Last night, she missed, by one jump, winning a figure-skating medal at the Winter Olympics.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2005
KITCHENER, Ontario - Fame comes at a price. For Kimmie Meissner, the bill arrived yesterday in the qualifying round of the World Junior Figure Skating Championships. Meissner did not look like the skater who won the bronze medal at the U.S. championships in January. She fell twice and failed to complete one jump, but still managed to finish 10th out of 43 skaters, with a score of 81.94. She will skate her short program today and her free skate Thursday. "It wasn't my best," said the 15-year-old from Bel Air, trying to make light of her performance.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2005
KITCHENER, Ontario - Too young to compete in next year's Winter Olympics, Mao Asada made the Junior World Figure Skating Championships her international stage. Asada, 14, was a clean, serene jumping machine as she nonchalantly landed one element after another - including a triple axel - to easily win the gold medal last night with an elegant performance that brought the audience to its feet. Bel Air's Kimmie Meissner, the defending silver medalist who entered the free skate in third place, self-destructed in the final 90 seconds of her program and dropped to fourth.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | March 21, 2008
GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN -- Figure skater Ashley Wagner summed it up best: "It's a lot harder than it looks." She was speaking about her performance at the World Figure Skating Championships, but she could have been the spokeswoman for U.S. teammates Kimmie Meissner and Bebe Liang. The trio faced the nearly impossible task of protecting the team's three slots for next year's world championships, the last before the 2010 Olympics. But that hope evaporated in a sea of nerves and missed opportunities.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | March 19, 2008
GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN -- Richard Callaghan has no idea why Kimmie Meissner lost her way -- and her U.S. and world figure skating titles -- over the past year. What her coach of five weeks does know is that his star pupil is performing jump combinations she could not do before. And the triple axel, the difficult jump that deserted her, is making a comeback, if not here at the World Figure Skating Championships, then next season. "Her talent is there," said Callaghan, who has trained Olympic, world and U.S. champions.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | February 12, 2007
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- So what was the Four Continents Figure Skating Championships worth to the top U.S. man and woman? At first glance, $15,000 each for winners Kimmie Meissner and Evan Lysacek. But the competition with all the luster of a parking-lot penny may end up being worth its weight in gold by the end of the skating season. Coming just two weeks after their gold-medal performances at the U.S. championships and a little more than a month before the world championships, Four Continents became a test of Meissner's and Lysacek's mettle and ability to raise their games on short notice.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | February 1, 2007
Skating beneath the glittering statute of Prometheus at the Rockefeller Plaza ice rink in New York yesterday, Kimmie Meissner looked tiny. But she was just as golden as the Greek god. On her whirlwind tour before returning to class at Fallston High School, Meissner, the national and world figure skating champion, performed for the Today show audience and began planning for another international competition next week. As a tuneup for the world championships in Tokyo next month, all of the newly crowned U.S. champions - including Meissner - will be at the Four Continents Figure Skating Championships in Colorado Springs, Colo.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | October 29, 2006
HARTFORD, Conn. -- One night after a sublime performance at Skate America that brought the house down and vaulted her into first place, Japanese teen figure skating sensation Mao Asada proved beatable. Minutes after landing a triple axel in warm-ups, Asada crashed back to earth last night when it really counted, while Bel Air's Kimmie Meissner rose to the occasion. As a result, Meissner, the reigning world champion, took the silver medal at the first stop on the Grand Prix circuit, finishing almost 15 points behind winner Miki Ando of Japan.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | October 27, 2006
Meissner set to jump-start season HARTFORD, Conn.-- --Last year, in her first season on the elite international circuit, Kimmie Meissner wanted her on-ice performances to show maturity. This year, having just turned 17, the reigning world champion is looking for "emotion and attitude," not to mention relocating the jump that made her famous in 2005. Meissner's new long program, skated to spirited Spanish guitar music, has passion and seven triple jumps, including the triple axel. It's the jump that sets her apart from other U.S. women, but is the staple of her rival, Japanese teen sensation Mao Asada.
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By SALVATORE ZANCA and SALVATORE ZANCA,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2005
PARIS -- Kimmie Meissner didn't mind congratulating herself. "I did a pretty good job out there," she said. "I give myself a pat on the back." She deserves it. After a disastrous short program Friday, she came back to deliver a sparkling and difficult performance that included two triple-triple combinations and two triple lutzes - the jump she fell out of in the short program. The Bel Air 16-year-old came in fifth overall and fourth in yesterday's free skate in the Trophee Eric Bompard.
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By SAL ZANCA and SAL ZANCA,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 4, 2005
OSAKA, Japan -- Kimmie Meissner learned something in her first year on the senior international figure skating circuit: "You have to skate clean." Under-rotated jumps caused some point losses that dropped Meissner from third to fifth at the NHK Trophy yesterday. "I think we are learning what things are about," said her coach, Pam Gregory. "Now we know some things." After a good short program Friday, the Bel Air 16-year-old made some mistakes that paved the way to another fifth-place finish after one at the Trophee Bompard in Paris.
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By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
After a season that included winning the world figure skating championship and finishing sixth at the Olympics, Kimmie Meissner is ready to start over. Next week, the Bel Air teenager will start working on new routines that judges and fans will see when she begins her second year on the Grand Prix circuit. Despite jumping from novice level to world's best in three years, Meissner harbors no illusions that she has it made. "I'm going to approach this year the way I did last year and the year before," said Meissner, whose first event is likely to be in late October at Skate America, the season's first Grand Prix event.
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By RICK MAESE | February 22, 2006
Turin, Italy-- --When the skating was done, the questions came in like horizontal rain, and Kimmie Meissner used her smile like an umbrella. All you could really see was her gleaming face, and you could faintly hear her soft voice. By my count, she was either "good" or "pretty good" 11 times and was "super excited" at least once. But if you really wanted to gauge the young skater's mood, you needed to see her fingers fidgeting behind her back and her knees bobbing back and forth. We're not talking about anxiety, we're talking about a genuine sense of excitement, from a young girl who had just flung any sense of awe into a triple lutz all its own. The Olympics?
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