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NEWS
By Hal Piper | January 4, 1997
A READER HAS kindly pointed out that there is too much tripe on the opposite-editorial page. He is quite right, and I am proud of some of that tripe. But the reader thinks it a problem, and he offers a solution -- peer review.''I am expected to publish as a condition of my employment,'' notes my correspondent, who is a physician. ''When I submit my data for publication, it must undergo the scrutiny of up to four reviewers and an editorial board. . . . There is no assurance that the paper will be deemed suitable for publication.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
Tortilleria Sinaloa is a tiny storefront in Fells Point with no tables but eight stools at two counters. That doesn't deter tourists, natives and neighbors from testing their Spanish on the barely bi-lingual but friendly staff while trying to order from the compact menu. And nothing makes me feel more comfortable in a first time visit to a little street joint than having a neat young woman in constant motion wiping counters, stools, equipment and anything else that might need wiping.
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 17, 1994
It seemed as if every other shopper at the Waverly Farmers Market was walking down Barclay Street with an armload of rhubarb.The claret-red stalks topped by floppy green leaves stuck out of the carrying bags people lugged from the weekly open-air market.Rhubarb. Now there's a dish that will divide people sitting at the dinner table faster than a discussion of politics. Some people hate it; others consider it one of May's most heaven-sent gifts.Both of my grandmothers believed in rhubarb's quasi-medicinal value.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 7, 2009
I opened a restaurant menu this week and found two cautionary words: "shad roe." It's a dish that divides Baltimore. Those who will and those who won't partake. For the record, I tried it once when a Bolton Hill woman served it to me at a spring dinner party. She acted as if it were such a delicacy - as did the others assembled. I got it down, only assisted by glasses of alcohol to mask the fish oil taste. I am one of the Baltimoreans who take the Shad Roe Never-Again Pledge. I was never much of a Baltimore seafood lover - I'll try a crabcake once a year.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 27, 2007
Peter Falk is listed as one of the co-stars of Next, the ESP/time travel flick starring Nicolas Cage as a guy who can see two minutes into his own future. But really, the filmmakers shouldn't have bothered. Sure, Falk, 79, shows up for one scene, playing formula role No. 27b in the Hollywood handbook: the irascible old codger to Cage's brash, adventurous hotshot. But Falk barely registers (he's onscreen only a couple minutes), and the part is absolutely inconsequential. Chances are Falk's part was bigger in the original script but was trimmed for reasons we may never know.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
Tortilleria Sinaloa is a tiny storefront in Fells Point with no tables but eight stools at two counters. That doesn't deter tourists, natives and neighbors from testing their Spanish on the barely bi-lingual but friendly staff while trying to order from the compact menu. And nothing makes me feel more comfortable in a first time visit to a little street joint than having a neat young woman in constant motion wiping counters, stools, equipment and anything else that might need wiping.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 7, 2009
I opened a restaurant menu this week and found two cautionary words: "shad roe." It's a dish that divides Baltimore. Those who will and those who won't partake. For the record, I tried it once when a Bolton Hill woman served it to me at a spring dinner party. She acted as if it were such a delicacy - as did the others assembled. I got it down, only assisted by glasses of alcohol to mask the fish oil taste. I am one of the Baltimoreans who take the Shad Roe Never-Again Pledge. I was never much of a Baltimore seafood lover - I'll try a crabcake once a year.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 16, 2006
My father, Joe Kelly, caught the spirit of pre-Christmas 1920s the other day over lunch. He told me how he would make his way uptown, as he called it, from his South Baltimore home and head to French's, the West Baltimore Street sporting-goods shop that sold Lionel trains at this time of the year. A few days later, the Rev. Charles Borges, a learned Jesuit from Loyola College, described these days before Christmas, better known as Advent, as a "rehearsal" for the great feast.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | August 7, 1999
ONE DEMORALIZINGLY hot summer morning my mother took hold of the push bar of a Value City shopping cart and stated unequivocally, "This is my therapy."So it was. She loved to shop, from the old Filene's basement in Boston to the old Julius Garfinkel's on F Street in Washington. She covered them all, reserving a special passion for an item with the slash of a red pen through its price tag.That day six years ago was a hell-fired scorcher.It was a vacation day for me and I somehow had agreed to ride along on what was billed as a simple-and-sweet shopping excursion.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | December 4, 2001
WASHINGTON - We've seen ample evidence during the past 10 weeks of the capacity of Middle Eastern people to indulge in self-delusion and downright lies. There is, for instance, the hardy anti-Semitic libel believed by majorities of the peoples of Islamic nations that "5,000 Jews failed to show up for work" at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11. This lie is being circulated by the official media in many Arab nations and has also surfaced on American radio stations geared to black audiences.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 27, 2007
Peter Falk is listed as one of the co-stars of Next, the ESP/time travel flick starring Nicolas Cage as a guy who can see two minutes into his own future. But really, the filmmakers shouldn't have bothered. Sure, Falk, 79, shows up for one scene, playing formula role No. 27b in the Hollywood handbook: the irascible old codger to Cage's brash, adventurous hotshot. But Falk barely registers (he's onscreen only a couple minutes), and the part is absolutely inconsequential. Chances are Falk's part was bigger in the original script but was trimmed for reasons we may never know.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 16, 2006
My father, Joe Kelly, caught the spirit of pre-Christmas 1920s the other day over lunch. He told me how he would make his way uptown, as he called it, from his South Baltimore home and head to French's, the West Baltimore Street sporting-goods shop that sold Lionel trains at this time of the year. A few days later, the Rev. Charles Borges, a learned Jesuit from Loyola College, described these days before Christmas, better known as Advent, as a "rehearsal" for the great feast.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | December 4, 2001
WASHINGTON - We've seen ample evidence during the past 10 weeks of the capacity of Middle Eastern people to indulge in self-delusion and downright lies. There is, for instance, the hardy anti-Semitic libel believed by majorities of the peoples of Islamic nations that "5,000 Jews failed to show up for work" at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11. This lie is being circulated by the official media in many Arab nations and has also surfaced on American radio stations geared to black audiences.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | August 7, 1999
ONE DEMORALIZINGLY hot summer morning my mother took hold of the push bar of a Value City shopping cart and stated unequivocally, "This is my therapy."So it was. She loved to shop, from the old Filene's basement in Boston to the old Julius Garfinkel's on F Street in Washington. She covered them all, reserving a special passion for an item with the slash of a red pen through its price tag.That day six years ago was a hell-fired scorcher.It was a vacation day for me and I somehow had agreed to ride along on what was billed as a simple-and-sweet shopping excursion.
NEWS
By Hal Piper | January 4, 1997
A READER HAS kindly pointed out that there is too much tripe on the opposite-editorial page. He is quite right, and I am proud of some of that tripe. But the reader thinks it a problem, and he offers a solution -- peer review.''I am expected to publish as a condition of my employment,'' notes my correspondent, who is a physician. ''When I submit my data for publication, it must undergo the scrutiny of up to four reviewers and an editorial board. . . . There is no assurance that the paper will be deemed suitable for publication.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 17, 1994
It seemed as if every other shopper at the Waverly Farmers Market was walking down Barclay Street with an armload of rhubarb.The claret-red stalks topped by floppy green leaves stuck out of the carrying bags people lugged from the weekly open-air market.Rhubarb. Now there's a dish that will divide people sitting at the dinner table faster than a discussion of politics. Some people hate it; others consider it one of May's most heaven-sent gifts.Both of my grandmothers believed in rhubarb's quasi-medicinal value.
NEWS
August 17, 2011
Here's a request from a frustrated voter to all public servants: Will you please be specific? I'm supposed to make informed decisions based on the information public officials provide. But where is that data? What's the address of the Medicare facility they intend to close? The department in the Pentagon where the ax will fall? The name of the government contractor whose contract will end, and the state where his business is located? Tell us exactly what should be stopped and where.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
Anthony Bourdain was about to say that he was "sorry" for the way he depicted Baltimore on his "No Reservations" show last winter on the Travel Channel. In that piece, he characterized Baltimore as a gritty city as he prowled rundown neighborhoods with characters from "The Wire," ate lake trout at The Roost in West Baltimore and pit beef at Chaps on Pulaski Highway, and chugged bluish cocktails with construction workers at Mo's Seafood in East Baltimore. The episode provoked outrage among some city pundits and bloggers, who thought it dissed the city.
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