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NEWS
January 29, 1995
He called it his "trilogy of speeches" and over the past 12 days, Parris N. Glendening used these occasions -- his inaugural address, budget message and State of the State address -- to set a tone and a clear mandate for his new administration in Annapolis that is both firm and specific. It is a consciously middle-of-the-road message that advocates fiscal caution and a targeted agenda of immediate actions aimed at boosting Maryland's still fragile economic recovery.Governor Glendening -- little-known in much of the state, even after his election -- succeeded in giving Marylanders a more defined look at the kind of administration they can expect over the next four years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
In the spring of 1981, when Marion Rodgers was a senior at Goucher College, she nearly fell on top of a box of old papers that would change her life. Rodgers was preparing an article for the student newspaper paper on a former author and Goucher professor named Sara Haardt - who later married the iconoclastic journalist H.L. Mencken. "I was putting away one of her scrapbooks in the vault of the library's rare book room when I literally stumbled over a box that was lying on the floor next to a shelf," said Rodgers, now a resident of Washington, D.C. "Taped on the top of the box was a message that basically said, 'Do not open until 1981.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The math is daunting: More than 2,300 pages of prose winnowed down to 190, including photographs and the occasional blank sheet that signals chapter breaks. Yet, that's exactly the challenge that author and historian Taylor Branch tackled when he condensed his three-part history of the U.S. civil rights movement into one slender volume that could be taught in the nation's classrooms. Never mind that Branch, now 66, devoted more than 25 years of his life to crafting his acclaimed trilogy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
In one way or another, Manil Suri has spent his entire life charting what happens when polar opposites are brought together in unexpected and at times startling juxtapositions. Suri, 53, is an acclaimed novelist, and a career mathematician who teaches at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He spent the first two decades of his life in India and the past three in the United States. Though all his books to date have been set in Mumbai, they are written in English. Suri's debut novel, "The Death of Vishnu," set off a bidding war between 11 publishing houses in 2001.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 29, 2005
Placido Domingo, an incurable multitasker, opened Washington National Opera's 50th anniversary season conducting a production from the orchestra pit one week and singing in another the next. In between all of this activity, the superstar tenor continued to hold down his day job as general director of the company (and of the Los Angeles Opera, too.) A lot of folks probably wish Domingo would forget all about that extra stuff and just sing. Now 64, he's still capable of producing more beautiful, dynamic vocalism than a whole mess of tenors.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1997
Biosys Inc., the Columbia bio-pesticides company, said yesterday that it will seek U.S. Bankruptcy Court approval Tuesday for its plan to sell most of its assets to Thermo Trilogy Corp., another Columbia bio-pesticides firm.Biosys, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in September, said in a statement that it estimates the value of the Thermo Trilogy deal at $15 million to $21 million.In its bankruptcy filing, which resulted from a severe cash shortage, Biosys listed assets of $24.1 million as of June 30, 1996.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 16, 2003
Some people can't wait to see The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, and have had their tickets in hand for weeks. Some people can't wait to experience The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, and have their costumes ready, their Internet chat rooms primed, their Elfin dialects perfected. Then there's Michael Brown. He's the guy who pitched a tent outside the Senator Theatre at 11:30 a.m. yesterday, to ensure he's first in line for today's long-awaited Trilogy Tuesday, a first-in-a-lifetime chance to see all three chapters of Peter Jackson's Rings trilogy on the big screen back-to-back-to-back (the first two in extended director's cuts, no less)
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this article | January 15, 1997
The two clubs -- Volcano's on Greenmount Avenue and Trilogy on Eutaw Street -- were close cousins. They had similar clientele. Similar problems with the city. And the same important backer: Mary Ross.So there was a certain symmetry to this week's arrest: When police picked up the alleged shooter in the Oct. 24 slayings of two college students outside Volcano's nightclub, they found the suspect as he left Club Trilogy.In East Baltimore, Ross, as community coordinator for Johnston Square Community Development Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 15, 2005
Without Rick McCallum, we may never have learned how Anakin Skywalker, with the potential to be the greatest of all Jedi Knights, instead chose to become Darth Vader, the near-perfection of evil. A week before the premiere of writer-director George Lucas' Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith, McCallum, the producer of the Star Wars prequel trilogy, remembers with pleasure the crack creative team he'd assembled. "On the first Star Wars movie, George had the worst crew in England," says McCallum over the phone from London.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 1998
The French playwright Beaumarchais thought of his great "Figaro" trilogy as a political statement that undermined the rigid class structure of 18th-century Europe.But somehow, in "The Barber of Seville" and "The Marriage of Figaro," he got past polemics and created characters who took on a life of their own.Figaro and Susannah, the clever barber and his equally smart wife, and the hotblooded young page, Cherubino, have been adopted by playwrights and composers ever since they made their literary debut in 1784.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The math is daunting: More than 2,300 pages of prose winnowed down to 190, including photographs and the occasional blank sheet that signals chapter breaks. Yet, that's exactly the challenge that author and historian Taylor Branch tackled when he condensed his three-part history of the U.S. civil rights movement into one slender volume that could be taught in the nation's classrooms. Never mind that Branch, now 66, devoted more than 25 years of his life to crafting his acclaimed trilogy.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | December 14, 2012
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey , has split the critics, creating a gulf as vast as the one separating Bilbo Baggins and Gollum. Such criticism could be expected from a movie that kicks off a trilogy -- yet is drawn from a novel that ran all of about 330 pages . So there's a bit of a slow wind-up here, something that has enraged a number of critics who wanted more action from a J.R.R. Tolkien adaptation. Here are exceprt from some movie reviews: -- Tribune: Extracting three generously proportioned films from Tolkien's books made sense.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
Three of the most popular books in America are being kept off the shelves of the Harford County Public Library system because administrators consider them to be pornographic. British author E.L. James' erotic trilogy about a steamy affair between an innocent literature student and an entrepreneur with dangerous desires has topped the list of Amazon.com's best-selling books. Ditto for the New York Times' best-selling fiction list. Every other library system in Central Maryland owns copies of "Fifty Shades of Grey" and its two sequels, and maintains waiting lists of hundreds of eager readers who want to check them out. Harford County's reluctance to purchase the novels in the face of overwhelming public demand and accusations of censorship places it in among an embattled minority of libraries nationwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com; Publisher's Weekly | December 14, 2008
tuesday Blood Sins : by Kay Hooper (Bantam, $25). In this disturbing paranormal thriller, the second in a trilogy (after Blood Dreams) from best-seller Kay Hooper, Noah Bishop, of the FBI's Special Crimes Unit, and Haven, a civilian investigative organization, take on the fanatical Rev. Adam Deacon Samuel. Amazon.com; Publisher's Weekly
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
Of the 1,200 performances that Charlie Ross has given of his One-Man Star Wars Trilogy, the most memorable might have been a show he performed in Dubai in early 2006. "Some people in the audience were in full Lawrence of Arabia gear, with flowing robes and head-wraps," he says. "It was quite strange to see that mixed crowd genuinely enjoying themselves. I shudder to think that there might be people living in the desert who watch Star Wars on televisions in their tents, but it's completely possible."
ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
Thanks to all who played our latest quiz on Baltimore-area authors. For those who were stumped, here are the answers: 1. A frequent heroine in Laura Lippman novels is former reporter (and Lippman alter-ego?) Tess Monaghan, whose greyhound is named Esskay. 2. Russell Baker worked at The Sun before becoming a commentator for The New York Times. His wonderful memoir about Baltimore is called Growing Up. 3. Anne Tyler, whose novels include The Accidental Tourist, Saint Maybe and Digging to America, often chronicles the love and conflict of family life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
In one way or another, Manil Suri has spent his entire life charting what happens when polar opposites are brought together in unexpected and at times startling juxtapositions. Suri, 53, is an acclaimed novelist, and a career mathematician who teaches at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He spent the first two decades of his life in India and the past three in the United States. Though all his books to date have been set in Mumbai, they are written in English. Suri's debut novel, "The Death of Vishnu," set off a bidding war between 11 publishing houses in 2001.
FEATURES
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | January 16, 2006
He has come to the end of a nearly 24-year literary journey that, almost unimaginably, he once thought would take him three years. At some point - after all these years he can't remember when - it dawned on biographer Taylor Branch that his civil rights trilogy would be, as he called it, his "life's work," something that has consumed much of his adulthood but has also rendered him an authority on one of America's most turbulent periods. His final installment, now reaching bookstores, At Canaan's Edge: America in the King Years, 1965-68 (Simon & Schuster, 1,041 pages, $35)
ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | November 23, 2008
Since we ran our last quiz about Baltimore's literary heritage, readers Rick Connor and Sally Lemmon suggested creating a more contemporary version. So here it is, with the caveat that some questions stray from Baltimore but stay within the state's border. 1. This author's heroine, often accompanied by a pet greyhound, is an expert at solving the city's mysteries. After naming the author, get bonus points for naming the heroine and greyhound. 2. He got his start at The Sun, became a well-known commentator for The New York Times and wrote a touching memoir about growing up here.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | August 26, 2008
Too Human The first of a planned trilogy of games for Xbox 360 reads a lot like Dungeons & Dragons meets Halo. New this month, the game creates an interesting parallel universe that allows high-tech robotics to co-exist with Norse mythology. And who doesn't want to see flesh-challenged cyberbabes duke it out with Valhalla's finest? Yet both constituencies are in for a luke-warm hybrid. The sword-and-sorcery set are the most ill-served as the game relies heavily on cinematic cut scenes that aim for mystery but ultimately just confound.
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