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BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1997
In a move foreshadowing utility competition in Baltimore, the owner of a downtown Baltimore office building has contracted for the first time with a power company other than Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. to supply it with electricity.Trigen-Baltimore Energy Corp.'s deal with the owners of the 25-story Blaustein Building calls for it to supply steam heat, cooling and water and sewer services to the 1 N. Charles St. office tower.But, more significantly, Trigen-Baltimore also will likely generate electricity on-site for the 287,000-square-foot building, via generators installed 30 feet underground.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2006
Almost five months ago, the company that operates the steam tunnels that snake beneath Baltimore pledged a $6.6 million upgrade to its system - an effort that officials said would smooth the bumpy ride motorists face downtown. But now, the company, Trigen, is months behind schedule, and the cost of the project is beginning to exceed estimates, utility officials told the city yesterday. That means some roads - specifically Baltimore and Saratoga streets - will remain rough for at least a few more months.
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BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
With the promise of more than $1 million in savings each year, Trigen-Cinergy Solutions LLC has won a 15-year contract to provide electricity and steam for Millennium Inorganic Chemicals' Hawkins Point plant.The utility company, a joint venture between Trigen Energy Corp. of White Plains, N.Y., and Cincinnati's Cinergy Corp., will install a combined heat and power (CHP) plant at Millennium's facility. CHP plants are considered more efficient because they trap and use excess power that is often lost in other energy-production processes.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
Towson University said yesterday that it awarded a contract to Trigen Energy Baltimore to study the campus' energy usage and to identify savings. Trigen executives said it can save the university at least 15 percent of its $4 million annual energy costs. "After carefully examining our needs and requirements, our selection of Trigen is based on their leadership in applying innovative and cost-saving energy solutions," Hoke L. Smith, Towson's president, said. The university consists of 41 buildings on a 328-acre campus.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1998
Trigen-Baltimore Energy Corp. has been selected by the University of Maryland to provide heating services to more than 20 buildings at its downtown campus and hospital, contracts that will generate more than $85 million for the alternative energy company.The selection of Trigen-Baltimore to supply heat to both the University of Maryland Medical System and the University of Maryland, Baltimore comes on the heels of its selection for $200 million worth of work by the U.S. Department of the Air Force.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
To most, it's just steam billowing out of pipes below the steel grates downtown. To two Baltimore energy companies, it's a cloud made of money.Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and Trigen-Baltimore Energy Corp. say profits are to be made from the steam system that provides heat to downtown buildings. For a decade, Trigen has commanded the steam market. Today, BGE wants to get in on the action.And therein lies a tussle that has each charging the other with monopoly, unfair competition and schoolyard-style bullying.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1995
In the quest to control steam heat to downtown buildings, Baltimore Gas and Electric yesterday won critical approval of a City Council committee to allow it to enter the market exclusively run for 10 years by rival energy company, Trigen-Baltimore Energy Corp.BGE officials called the Highways and Franchises Committee's approval good for competition and said customers will benefit. Trigen representatives maintained that in the long run, customers will lose because BGE could drive the company out of business and create a monopoly.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1995
James Abromitis had just moved from New York, and was settling into his new job as president of the Baltimore division of Trigen Energy Corp. (formerly known as Baltimore Thermal) when he opened the local newspaper one morning and discovered his job had just gotten much harder.His task was difficult enough to start with. The 36-year-old engineer-turned-finance specialist was sent from Trigen's White Plains, N.Y., headquarters with plans to triple the size of the Maryland operations by the end of the decade.
NEWS
February 21, 1994
Steam belches forth from the smokestack on Guilford Avenue in downtown Baltimore as if some locomotive were buried at full throttle under the pavement.Motorists must dodge metal plates surrounding the stack erected along the 200 block of Guilford months ago. The vapor itself can be a distraction, so fierce is the hot steam that shoots upward.Intrepid Commuter recently heard from a reader puzzled by this imposing structure. What is it? Why is it there? Will you please make it go away?For an answer, we turned to the folks at Trigen-Baltimore Energy Corp.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2000
With the dawn of electric deregulation in Maryland set for July 1, two energy companies with operations in the state are preparing to invade Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s home turf. Yet, the two companies, Trigen Energy Corp. and Potomac Electric Power Co., are taking vastly different approaches, illustrating how deregulation has spawned a diversity of strategies as energy companies try to woo new customers. Only time will tell which strategies will work, said Maurice E. May, an energy analyst with Friedman, Billings, Ramsey in Arlington, Va. "What's interesting about utilities is that they all used to do the exact same thing," May said.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2000
With the dawn of electric deregulation in Maryland set for July 1, two energy companies with operations in the state are preparing to invade Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s home turf. Yet, the two companies, Trigen Energy Corp. and Potomac Electric Power Co., are taking vastly different approaches, illustrating how deregulation has spawned a diversity of strategies as energy companies try to woo new customers. Only time will tell which strategies will work, said Maurice E. May, an energy analyst with Friedman, Billings, Ramsey in Arlington, Va. "What's interesting about utilities is that they all used to do the exact same thing," May said.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
Trigen-Cinergy Solutions said yesterday that it signed a 20-year deal worth about $200 million with Sweetheart Cup Co. to provide electricity and steam to the paper and plastic food-ware maker's manufacturing facility at its Owings Mills headquarters.The deal calls for TCS to build a 15-megawatt co- generation plant on the site, said James J. Abromitis, president of Trigen Energy Baltimore, the local branch of Trigen Energy Corp. of White Plains, N.Y. The plant should be completed by the fourth quarter of 2000, he said.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
With the promise of more than $1 million in savings each year, Trigen-Cinergy Solutions LLC has won a 15-year contract to provide electricity and steam for Millennium Inorganic Chemicals' Hawkins Point plant.The utility company, a joint venture between Trigen Energy Corp. of White Plains, N.Y., and Cincinnati's Cinergy Corp., will install a combined heat and power (CHP) plant at Millennium's facility. CHP plants are considered more efficient because they trap and use excess power that is often lost in other energy-production processes.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1998
Trigen-Baltimore Energy Corp. has been selected by the University of Maryland to provide heating services to more than 20 buildings at its downtown campus and hospital, contracts that will generate more than $85 million for the alternative energy company.The selection of Trigen-Baltimore to supply heat to both the University of Maryland Medical System and the University of Maryland, Baltimore comes on the heels of its selection for $200 million worth of work by the U.S. Department of the Air Force.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1997
Potomac Electric Power Co. and a New York alternative energy supplier have formed a partnership, a move that could have wide-ranging and negative implications for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s planned merger with Pepco.The joint venture between the Washington utility and Trigen Energy Corp., which directly competes with BGE in downtown Baltimore, was formed to study the potential for heating and cooling federal government buildings in Washington."The federal government spends millions of dollars each year to run steam plants in downtown Washington," said Thomas R. Casten, Trigen Energy's president and chief executive.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 25, 1997
A White Plains, N.Y., utility company is expanding its Baltimore presence by setting up a division here to pursue federal projects.Trigen Energy Corp. formed the division, Trigen Energy Federal Projects, after it was awarded a $150 million Department of Defense contract, according to Jim J. Abromitis, president of Trigen Energy Baltimore and the new division.Trigen has four facilities in the Baltimore area that produce heat, steam and cooling. The company competes with Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.Abromitis said the company's growth has been helped by a new federal policy that allows the company to go directly to those in charge of federal facilities who can award contracts to their company without going through a lengthy process of bidding.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 25, 1997
A White Plains, N.Y., utility company is expanding its Baltimore presence by setting up a division here to pursue federal projects.Trigen Energy Corp. formed the division, Trigen Energy Federal Projects, after it was awarded a $150 million Department of Defense contract, according to Jim J. Abromitis, president of Trigen Energy Baltimore and the new division.Trigen has four facilities in the Baltimore area that produce heat, steam and cooling. The company competes with Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.Abromitis said the company's growth has been helped by a new federal policy that allows the company to go directly to those in charge of federal facilities who can award contracts to their company without going through a lengthy process of bidding.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1997
Potomac Electric Power Co. and a New York alternative energy supplier have formed a partnership, a move that could have wide-ranging and negative implications for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s planned merger with Pepco.The joint venture between the Washington utility and Trigen Energy Corp., which directly competes with BGE in downtown Baltimore, was formed to study the potential for heating and cooling federal government buildings in Washington."The federal government spends millions of dollars each year to run steam plants in downtown Washington," said Thomas R. Casten, Trigen Energy's president and chief executive.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1997
In a move foreshadowing utility competition in Baltimore, the owner of a downtown Baltimore office building has contracted for the first time with a power company other than Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. to supply it with electricity.Trigen-Baltimore Energy Corp.'s deal with the owners of the 25-story Blaustein Building calls for it to supply steam heat, cooling and water and sewer services to the 1 N. Charles St. office tower.But, more significantly, Trigen-Baltimore also will likely generate electricity on-site for the 287,000-square-foot building, via generators installed 30 feet underground.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1995
In the quest to control steam heat to downtown buildings, Baltimore Gas and Electric yesterday won critical approval of a City Council committee to allow it to enter the market exclusively run for 10 years by rival energy company, Trigen-Baltimore Energy Corp.BGE officials called the Highways and Franchises Committee's approval good for competition and said customers will benefit. Trigen representatives maintained that in the long run, customers will lose because BGE could drive the company out of business and create a monopoly.
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