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By Bruce Friedland and By Bruce Friedland,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2001
Trieste and the Meaning of Nowhere, by Jan Morris. Simon and Schuster. 203 pages, $23. "A great city that has lost its purpose is like a specialist in retirement," suggests the celebrated travel writer and historian Jan Morris. "He potters around the house. He tinkers with this hobby or that. He reads a little, watches television for half an hour, does a bit of gardening." But through it all, he understands "that the real energy of his life, the fascination of his calling that has driven him with so much satisfaction for so many years, is never going to be resumed."
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | November 12, 2007
Dr. Umberto VillaSanta, an expert in gynecology and related fields, died of cancer Thursday at his Norwood Heights home. He was 80. From 1962 until his retirement in 1987, he was the director of the division of gynecologic oncology at the University of Maryland Medical School. In addition to treating patients and teaching at the school and hospital, he conducted research. He was the author of more than 60 papers published in medical journals. His fields included long-term studies of varying treatment methods for cervical cancer and the value of different diagnostic techniques for cervical malignancies.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 1997
TRIESTE, Italy -- The cavernous pits and gorges scattered throughout the hills above this port city hold dark secrets from the twilight days of World War II, secrets that still disturb Italy and its Balkan neighbors.The pits, covered with tons of debris, are believed to hold hundreds, perhaps thousands, of corpses. The bodies are those of Italians and Yugoslavs who opposed the Yugoslav Communist takeover of the city in May 1945, along with scores of captured Germans. But attempts to investigate have gone nowhere.
TRAVEL
By John Flinn and John Flinn,San Francisco Chronicle | November 14, 2004
I didn't want to sound like a dope in front of the greatest travel writer of our time, so when Jan Morris told me her favorite city in all the world was Trieste, I nodded with what I hoped was a knowing look on my face and repeated, "Ah, Trieste." Then I ran off to consult an atlas. I wasn't 100 percent sure where the place was. Turns out I'm far from alone. Hardly anyone seems to have a good fix on this oddly entrancing Adriatic port, this white elephant of a vanished empire, this Vienna-by-the-Sea, as Paul Theroux called it. Certainly not the Italians, 70 percent of whom, according to a 1999 poll cited by Morris, didn't know it was part of their own country.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 1997
TRIESTE, Italy -- The cavernous pits and gorges scattered throughout the hills above this port city hold dark secrets from the twilight days of World War II, secrets that still disturb Italy and its Balkan neighbors.The pits, covered with tons of debris, are believed to hold hundreds, perhaps thousands, of corpses. The bodies are those of Italians and Yugoslavs who opposed the Yugoslav Communist takeover of the city in May 1945, along with scores of captured Germans. But attempts to investigate have gone nowhere.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1998
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Old Trieste, a little-known colt from California, blistered Churchill Downs yesterday morning, working six furlongs in 1 minute, 9 seconds.Students of the Kentucky Derby said that was possibly the fastest six-furlong Derby work in history. A furlong is one-eighth mile.The only comparable workout they could recall was Forego's five furlongs in 57 seconds before the 1973 Kentucky Derby, won by Secretariat. Forego finished fourth."I've just never had a horse work like this -- ever," said trainer Mike Puype, who seemed stunned by the time (two-fifths of a second off the track record for three-quarters mile)
TRAVEL
By John Flinn and John Flinn,San Francisco Chronicle | November 14, 2004
I didn't want to sound like a dope in front of the greatest travel writer of our time, so when Jan Morris told me her favorite city in all the world was Trieste, I nodded with what I hoped was a knowing look on my face and repeated, "Ah, Trieste." Then I ran off to consult an atlas. I wasn't 100 percent sure where the place was. Turns out I'm far from alone. Hardly anyone seems to have a good fix on this oddly entrancing Adriatic port, this white elephant of a vanished empire, this Vienna-by-the-Sea, as Paul Theroux called it. Certainly not the Italians, 70 percent of whom, according to a 1999 poll cited by Morris, didn't know it was part of their own country.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1957: Sputnik circles the earth1957: Ghana independent1959: St. Lawrence Seaway opens1960: Trieste dives 35,800 feet
SPORTS
May 5, 1998
The horses listed as either probable or possible for the Preakness on May 16:Probable (Derby finish)Cape Town (5th)Classic CatComic StripHalory Hunter (4th)Hot WellsIndian Charlie (3rd)Monk's FalconReal Quiet (1st)Possible (Derby finish)Black CashChilito (11th)Coronado's QuestFavorite Trick (8th)Old Trieste (10th)Parade Ground (6th)Spartan CatSuper JetThomas JoVictory Gallop (2nd)Yarrow BraePub Date: 5/05/98
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | August 24, 1992
Tom Gugliotta, the Washington Bullets' first-round draft choice, has crossed Trieste, Italy, off his basketball shopping list and reportedly is exploring the possibility of playing this season in Barcelona, Spain.On Friday, Gugliotta told the Raleigh (N.C.) News & Observer that Stefanel of Trieste had withdrawn the two-year contract offer it made in his visit last month.Gugliotta's agent, Richard Howell of Atlanta, said yesterday he had not heard officially from Stefanel that the team no longer was interested in the All-Atlantic Coast Conference forward.
NEWS
By Cynthia Glover and Cynthia Glover,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2003
TRIESTE, Italy - It's difficult to pinpoint where in the world you are when walking the streets of Trieste. Turn a corner and it looks like Vienna. Another, and suddenly you're in Prague. Still another, and you are in Paris. Even the language is distinctive. It sounds like Italian - and we are, indeed, in Italy - but the vowels are thicker and the vocabulary flecked with the multiconsonant tones of Eastern Europe. The same is true at the table, where classic Italian dishes are transformed by a confluence of Latin, Germanic and Slavic influences.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bruce Friedland and By Bruce Friedland,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2001
Trieste and the Meaning of Nowhere, by Jan Morris. Simon and Schuster. 203 pages, $23. "A great city that has lost its purpose is like a specialist in retirement," suggests the celebrated travel writer and historian Jan Morris. "He potters around the house. He tinkers with this hobby or that. He reads a little, watches television for half an hour, does a bit of gardening." But through it all, he understands "that the real energy of his life, the fascination of his calling that has driven him with so much satisfaction for so many years, is never going to be resumed."
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1957: Sputnik circles the earth1957: Ghana independent1959: St. Lawrence Seaway opens1960: Trieste dives 35,800 feet
SPORTS
May 5, 1998
The horses listed as either probable or possible for the Preakness on May 16:Probable (Derby finish)Cape Town (5th)Classic CatComic StripHalory Hunter (4th)Hot WellsIndian Charlie (3rd)Monk's FalconReal Quiet (1st)Possible (Derby finish)Black CashChilito (11th)Coronado's QuestFavorite Trick (8th)Old Trieste (10th)Parade Ground (6th)Spartan CatSuper JetThomas JoVictory Gallop (2nd)Yarrow BraePub Date: 5/05/98
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1998
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Old Trieste, a little-known colt from California, blistered Churchill Downs yesterday morning, working six furlongs in 1 minute, 9 seconds.Students of the Kentucky Derby said that was possibly the fastest six-furlong Derby work in history. A furlong is one-eighth mile.The only comparable workout they could recall was Forego's five furlongs in 57 seconds before the 1973 Kentucky Derby, won by Secretariat. Forego finished fourth."I've just never had a horse work like this -- ever," said trainer Mike Puype, who seemed stunned by the time (two-fifths of a second off the track record for three-quarters mile)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 1997
TRIESTE, Italy -- The cavernous pits and gorges scattered throughout the hills above this port city hold dark secrets from the twilight days of World War II, secrets that still disturb Italy and its Balkan neighbors.The pits, covered with tons of debris, are believed to hold hundreds, perhaps thousands, of corpses. The bodies are those of Italians and Yugoslavs who opposed the Yugoslav Communist takeover of the city in May 1945, along with scores of captured Germans. But attempts to investigate have gone nowhere.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | November 12, 2007
Dr. Umberto VillaSanta, an expert in gynecology and related fields, died of cancer Thursday at his Norwood Heights home. He was 80. From 1962 until his retirement in 1987, he was the director of the division of gynecologic oncology at the University of Maryland Medical School. In addition to treating patients and teaching at the school and hospital, he conducted research. He was the author of more than 60 papers published in medical journals. His fields included long-term studies of varying treatment methods for cervical cancer and the value of different diagnostic techniques for cervical malignancies.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | August 14, 1992
Washington Bullets general manager John Nash said yesterday that he will continue to negotiate with the agent of first-round draft choice Tom Gugliotta in an effort to keep the 6-foot-10 forward from signing with Stefanel Trieste of the Italian Basketball League."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 1997
TRIESTE, Italy -- The cavernous pits and gorges scattered throughout the hills above this port city hold dark secrets from the twilight days of World War II, secrets that still disturb Italy and its Balkan neighbors.The pits, covered with tons of debris, are believed to hold hundreds, perhaps thousands, of corpses. The bodies are those of Italians and Yugoslavs who opposed the Yugoslav Communist takeover of the city in May 1945, along with scores of captured Germans. But attempts to investigate have gone nowhere.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | August 24, 1992
Tom Gugliotta, the Washington Bullets' first-round draft choice, has crossed Trieste, Italy, off his basketball shopping list and reportedly is exploring the possibility of playing this season in Barcelona, Spain.On Friday, Gugliotta told the Raleigh (N.C.) News & Observer that Stefanel of Trieste had withdrawn the two-year contract offer it made in his visit last month.Gugliotta's agent, Richard Howell of Atlanta, said yesterday he had not heard officially from Stefanel that the team no longer was interested in the All-Atlantic Coast Conference forward.
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