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NEWS
March 24, 1991
Eleven Naval Academy seniors will present the results of their year of independent research as Trident Scholars at a conference on April 20.This year's Trident Scholars and their hometowns are Midshipmen David L. Blazes, Scranton, Pa.; Brian L. Davies, Newark, Del.; Jeffrey S. Dodge, La Jolla, Calif.; Robert C. Dunn, Prairie Grove, Ark.; Brian F. Hussey Jr., San Ramon, Ca.; Anthony J. Kotarski, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; William D. Kulp III, Salisbury; Paul A. Larson, Medina, Ohio; Casey J. Moton, Woodbridge, Va.; Stephen F. Murphy, Catonsville; and Daniel B. Robinson, Winchester, Va.During their junior year, the program candidates submitted their project proposals for review and recommendation by the Trident Scholar committee.
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NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,Los Angeles Times | December 5, 2006
LONDON -- British Prime Minister Tony Blair called yesterday for building a multibillion-dollar, new-generation nuclear submarine fleet to counter future threats from rogue nuclear states and nuclear terrorism. The move, which Blair justified as a hedge against potential threats from terrorists and states with nuclear ambitions, such as Iran and North Korea, rekindled debate over Britain's nuclear future and the role of such weapons in the post-Cold-War world. Blair said his government will support a top-to-bottom renewal of the nation's nuclear-powered submarine fleet, which is equipped with nuclear Trident ballistic missiles, to assure Britain's seat among the world's five major nuclear powers for decades into the future.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Trident II nuclear missile survived an effort yesterday by a Minnesota Congressman to end its production.During debate on its version of the defense budget for fiscal 1998, the House of Representatives rejected an amendment from Minnesota Democrat Rep. William Luther that would remove $309.1 million in the bill for seven of the Trident II submarine-launched intercontinental ballistic missiles.Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin, America's largest aerospace company, makes the missiles in Sunnyvale, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
The missile launchers that Lockheed Martin builds in Middle River will fire almost anything. You can throw in an anti-submarine rocket, a little Sea Sparrow, one of those new SM-4 land attack missiles, it doesn't matter. The MK-41 will light it off. Now the engineers on Eastern Boulevard hope to prove they can not only launch anything, but they also can launch anywhere - specifically, underwater. Lockheed Martin's Marine Systems unit, manufacturer of the premier missile launching system for the U.S. Navy's surface ships, is trying to convince the Pentagon that it knows how to fire missiles from submarines as well.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Blaming "unsubstantiated allegations," one of six companies vying for a multimillion-dollar Baltimore Housing Authority security contract withdrew its bid yesterday.In a brief written statement, Carol Troutman, vice president of the Trident Group, said the firm was withdrawing its proposal because of questions raised about the relationship between two of its owners and the administration of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke."Recent unsubstantiated allegations by a major newsprint organization have made our attempt to compete inequitable," she said, adding it was "irresponsible journalism" to raise questions of ethical conflict when the two owners, who are also city employees, had obtained approval from the city Board of Ethics.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,Los Angeles Times | December 5, 2006
LONDON -- British Prime Minister Tony Blair called yesterday for building a multibillion-dollar, new-generation nuclear submarine fleet to counter future threats from rogue nuclear states and nuclear terrorism. The move, which Blair justified as a hedge against potential threats from terrorists and states with nuclear ambitions, such as Iran and North Korea, rekindled debate over Britain's nuclear future and the role of such weapons in the post-Cold-War world. Blair said his government will support a top-to-bottom renewal of the nation's nuclear-powered submarine fleet, which is equipped with nuclear Trident ballistic missiles, to assure Britain's seat among the world's five major nuclear powers for decades into the future.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
The Naval Academy, a bastion of decorum and proper appearances, has gone to great lengths over the years to control publications bearing its name. Yet since February, a handful of midshipmen, sworn to secrecy, has produced a feisty, often irreverent underground newspaper online from a dorm room in the school's century-old residence hall. Called the Log Online after an embattled student newspaper that the academy killed last school year, the revived monthly pokes fun at the administration and runs editorials and content far afield of the cheery features about volunteerism and school events that appear in the Trident, the academy's official newspaper published by the school's public relations department.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A review by the Commerce Department has found that the U.S. government missed key national security problems when it allowed a Japanese company to buy the only U.S. manufacturer of some computer components used in the Patriot and Trident missiles.The transaction, involving a unit of Applied Magnetics Corp. of Goleta, Calif., was approved by the Bush administration in January. The sale was the first foreign investment issue taken up by the Clinton administration, which theoretically could still cancel it.Foreign embassies and many U.S. and foreign corporations have followed the case as a bellwether of the new administration's attitudes toward the sale of companies with militarily strategic technologies.
NEWS
By William Arkin | July 2, 1998
AT 1: 01 A.M. on the day President Clinton traveled to China, the United States launched a Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile from the coast of California.The test was not meant to provoke China -- indeed the president was probably unaware that the Air Force was coming to the end of a decade-long program to develop new guidance units for the missile. And no one in the national news media reported the test.Three days later, the president was signing a "detargeting" accord with China, one that even administration workers label largely symbolic.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
The missile launchers that Lockheed Martin builds in Middle River will fire almost anything. You can throw in an anti-submarine rocket, a little Sea Sparrow, one of those new SM-4 land attack missiles, it doesn't matter. The MK-41 will light it off. Now the engineers on Eastern Boulevard hope to prove they can not only launch anything, but they also can launch anywhere - specifically, underwater. Lockheed Martin's Marine Systems unit, manufacturer of the premier missile launching system for the U.S. Navy's surface ships, is trying to convince the Pentagon that it knows how to fire missiles from submarines as well.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
The Naval Academy, a bastion of decorum and proper appearances, has gone to great lengths over the years to control publications bearing its name. Yet since February, a handful of midshipmen, sworn to secrecy, has produced a feisty, often irreverent underground newspaper online from a dorm room in the school's century-old residence hall. Called the Log Online after an embattled student newspaper that the academy killed last school year, the revived monthly pokes fun at the administration and runs editorials and content far afield of the cheery features about volunteerism and school events that appear in the Trident, the academy's official newspaper published by the school's public relations department.
NEWS
By William Arkin | July 2, 1998
AT 1: 01 A.M. on the day President Clinton traveled to China, the United States launched a Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile from the coast of California.The test was not meant to provoke China -- indeed the president was probably unaware that the Air Force was coming to the end of a decade-long program to develop new guidance units for the missile. And no one in the national news media reported the test.Three days later, the president was signing a "detargeting" accord with China, one that even administration workers label largely symbolic.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Trident II nuclear missile survived an effort yesterday by a Minnesota Congressman to end its production.During debate on its version of the defense budget for fiscal 1998, the House of Representatives rejected an amendment from Minnesota Democrat Rep. William Luther that would remove $309.1 million in the bill for seven of the Trident II submarine-launched intercontinental ballistic missiles.Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin, America's largest aerospace company, makes the missiles in Sunnyvale, Calif.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Blaming "unsubstantiated allegations," one of six companies vying for a multimillion-dollar Baltimore Housing Authority security contract withdrew its bid yesterday.In a brief written statement, Carol Troutman, vice president of the Trident Group, said the firm was withdrawing its proposal because of questions raised about the relationship between two of its owners and the administration of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke."Recent unsubstantiated allegations by a major newsprint organization have made our attempt to compete inequitable," she said, adding it was "irresponsible journalism" to raise questions of ethical conflict when the two owners, who are also city employees, had obtained approval from the city Board of Ethics.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A review by the Commerce Department has found that the U.S. government missed key national security problems when it allowed a Japanese company to buy the only U.S. manufacturer of some computer components used in the Patriot and Trident missiles.The transaction, involving a unit of Applied Magnetics Corp. of Goleta, Calif., was approved by the Bush administration in January. The sale was the first foreign investment issue taken up by the Clinton administration, which theoretically could still cancel it.Foreign embassies and many U.S. and foreign corporations have followed the case as a bellwether of the new administration's attitudes toward the sale of companies with militarily strategic technologies.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
Eleven Naval Academy seniors will present the results of their year of independent research as Trident Scholars at a conference on April 20.This year's Trident Scholars and their hometowns are Midshipmen David L. Blazes, Scranton, Pa.; Brian L. Davies, Newark, Del.; Jeffrey S. Dodge, La Jolla, Calif.; Robert C. Dunn, Prairie Grove, Ark.; Brian F. Hussey Jr., San Ramon, Ca.; Anthony J. Kotarski, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; William D. Kulp III, Salisbury; Paul A. Larson, Medina, Ohio; Casey J. Moton, Woodbridge, Va.; Stephen F. Murphy, Catonsville; and Daniel B. Robinson, Winchester, Va.During their junior year, the program candidates submitted their project proposals for review and recommendation by the Trident Scholar committee.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2010
TeleCommunication Systems Inc. of Annapolis, which specializes in secure mobile communications for military and commercial clients, said Monday it plans to buy Trident Space & Defense LLC, of Torrance, Calif. Trident specializes in engineering and electronics solutions for global space and defense markets. The amount of the deal was not disclosed but TCS said it involved a mix of cash and three million shares of Class A common stock. Trident, which projects revenue of about $40 million for next year, is owned by Admiralty Partners Inc., a private equity firm.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1996
The 18-year-old Naval Academy student found dead in her dormitory bed in August had an undiagnosed heart abnormality that apparently caused a fatal disruption of her heartbeat, according to autopsy results released yesterday.Doctors at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington ruled out foul play and suicide in the sudden death Aug. 18 of Joanna F. Simer, a freshman from Minnetonka, Minn., said Chris Kelly, a spokesman for AFIP."We considered everything," Kelly said. "Our tests were as thorough and complete as they could be."
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