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Trick Or Treating

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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1996
In Carroll County, some towns tolerate Halloween, a few discourage it and the rest celebrate it.Most allow trick or treating, but restrict the hours and limit participants to costumed children under age 12. Residents who welcome young visitors Thursday night are urged to turn on outdoor lights.After a 20-year gap, Manchester will allow trick or treating again. The town threw its annual Halloween gala for all residents Saturday at Manchester Elementary School.Mayor Elmer C. Lippy, who arrived in a Roman toga, said he expected a few outsiders to crash the party.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Sandy rained on Havre de Grace's annual Halloween parade, but even a superstorm could not curtail trick-or-treating in the battered waterfront town. The Harford County city of 13,000 on the banks of the Susquehanna River postponed its annual Halloween parade and rescheduled it for Sunday because of the storm. But city officials gave the door-to-door quest for candy on Wednesday the go-ahead. "We are 95 percent back to normal," said Mayor Wayne H. Dougherty. "There is still the kid who loves Halloween in me, and I wanted the kids to enjoy the night.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 31, 2000
Most incorporated Carroll County towns allow trick-or-treating within town limits during certain hours Halloween night. New Windsor and Taneytown neither discourage nor condone trick-or-treating. The State Highway Administration in Westminster has safety vests that parents may borrow for tonight. The bright orange reflective vests can be worn over costumes to increase visibility during trick-or-treating. The SHA shop is at 150 Wyndtryst Drive, 410-848- 6565. Town regulations are: Westminster's mayor and Common Council will allow Halloween trick-or-treating from dusk to 8 p.m. today for children ages 12 and younger who are accompanied by parents or adult guardians.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
It was Halloween in Baltimore Highlands when Sterlin Corday Matthews donned a "Hellraiser" mask and went out with his friends. Before he returned home, one teen trick-or-treater had been shot to death and two others wounded. Jurors in Baltimore County took less than an hour Thursday to find Matthews, 19, guilty in the 2010 killing of Dequan Burks. The second-degree murder verdict came despite the fact that prosecutors had no gun to present in a case marked by uncooperative witnesses, who reluctantly identified the costumed shooter by his long braids and voice.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2001
To celebrate Halloween, Carroll County towns and shopping centers have planned parades, costume contests, trick or treating times and other activities, including the following: Westminster: Trick or treating from dusk until 8 p.m. Wednesday inside city limits. Children age 12 and younger can make the rounds with a parent or adult guardian. Trick or treaters are encouraged to wear light-colored clothing for safety. Residents wishing to participate should turn on porch lights. Information: 410-848-9000.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | October 30, 1991
Trick-or-treating might be banned, but no town will leave children all dressed up with no place to go this Halloween.Where bans are in effect, towns offer their younger residents alternatives, planning parties and parades to satisfy the quest for candy.Manchester tosses a party and provides treats for its children. Starting at 6:45 p.m. Thursday, children are invited to the ActivitiesBuilding to show off costumes and celebrate.Taneytown tries to keep its children off the streets on Halloween with a parade through the city, awards in several costume categories and a party at the Activities Building.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2000
Like a swarm of costumed locusts, scads of Harry Potters, Batmans, princesses and witches descended on Ellicott City's Main Street yesterday for the time-honored tradition of candy. Lots of it. Merchants, who have opened their doors to trick-or-treaters for at least a decade, were ready for the frenzy. Many were in costume themselves. They're not particularly surprised that as many as 700 children show up. It's safe, which pleases the parents, and the trick-or-treating is a kid's dream.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | October 31, 2007
foodallergy.org This site from the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network has lots of information on food allergies, including alerts about ingredients in foods and a page of Halloween safety tips to keep kids with allergies safe while trick-or-treating.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 30, 2000
Most incorporated Carroll County towns allow trick-or-treating within town limits during certain hours Halloween night. New Windsor and Taneytown neither discourage nor condone trick-or-treating. The State Highway Administration in Westminster has safety vests that parents may borrow for tomorrow night. The bright orange reflective vests can be worn over costumes to increase visibility during trick-or-treating. The SHA shop is at 150 Wyndtryst Drive, 410-848-6565. Town regulations are: Westminster's mayor and Common Council will allow Halloween trick-or-treating from dusk to 8 p.m. tomorrow for children ages 12 and younger who are accompanied by parents or adult guardians.
NEWS
October 28, 1999
Should Halloween be observed on the last Saturday of October? Some think so. When Oct. 31 falls on a weekday, children and parents must squeeze trick-or-treating and festivities in after school and work, often after dark, raising a safety issue. Celebrating on Saturday would allow earlier trick-or-treating and give families time to schedule other events, such as parties. What do you think?Let us hear from you, in 30 seconds or less, on our comments phone line, 410-715-2830. Or write 50 words or fewer and e-mail howard.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Liz Atwood writes: Last year, my boys told me they were too old for trick or treating. This year, they suddenly seem interested in Halloween again. The 16-year-old is trying to decide what villain he would like to be. He has narrowed it down Gollum from "Lord of the Rings" or the Batman nemesis Bane. The 11-year-old wants to be the hooded slasher from Assassin's Creed. Besides being underwhelmed with their character choices, I'm wondering if they are too old for trick-or-treating.
EXPLORE
October 25, 2011
Halloween trick-or-treat in the city will be held Monday, Oct. 31 from 6-8 p.m. City officials called for children to keep themselves safe during trick-or-treat activities, and urged parents to make sure their children's costumes reflect light and are visible in the dark of the early evening hours. Residents should leave their porch lights on to receive trick-or-treaters. To report any suspicious or criminal behavior including unsafe treats received, call Laurel Police Department at 301-498-0092.
EXPLORE
October 25, 2011
Trick or Treat on Main Street will be held Thursday, Oct. 27 from 6-8 p.m. Sponsored by the Laurel Board of Trade, shop owners on Main Street from Route 1 to Seventh Street will distribute Halloween candy. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. The Laurel Police Department and volunteers from Laurel Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association will help keep everyone safe. For information, call Gail, 301-483-0838.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | November 8, 2009
Makenna Burns is only 8, but she believes she'll never have a Halloween as memorable as this year's. Her Pocahontas costume garnered a slew of comments, including one from President Barack Obama. Makenna, a third-grader at Hammond Elementary in Laurel, was one of 200 children at the school to receive a ticket to the Obama family's first Halloween celebration at the White House. No one at the school is exactly sure how it was chosen, but they don't care. They're still basking in their brush with one of the most powerful families in the world.
HEALTH
By Joe Burris | joseph.burris@baltsun.com | October 29, 2009
With infection rates rising and the H1N1 vaccine in short supply, this Halloween comes with the added scare of swine flu - and Baltimore-area parents find themselves balancing the fun of a favorite holiday with worries about keeping kids healthy. Bobbing for apples is out for many this year, along with excessive time in crowds. Keepers of the candy bowl are advised to hand children their treats piece by piece, instead of letting the costumed minions help themselves. Primed to prevent the spread of germs, parents are keeping sanitizer handy, making certain their children wash their hands before and after handling candy wrappers, and saying no to any unwrapped sweets.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltimoresun.com | October 29, 2009
With infection rates rising and the H1N1 vaccine in short supply, this Halloween comes with the added scare of swine flu - and Baltimore-area parents find themselves balancing the fun of a favorite holiday with worries about keeping kids healthy. Bobbing for apples is out for many this year, along with excessive time in crowds. Keepers of the candy bowl are advised to hand children their treats piece by piece, instead of letting the costumed minions help themselves. Primed to prevent the spread of germs, parents are keeping sanitizer handy, making certain their children wash their hands before and after handling candy wrappers, and saying no to any unwrapped sweets.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2008
To get good and scared on Halloween night, a parent doesn't have to look far. There's the fear of a wayward Jujube getting lodged in your preteen's braces, the terror of running out of candy and leaving your neighbors on the front stoop to survey your messy house through the storm door and the horror of your kids hauling home pounds of cavity-inducing confections that everyone at home finds impossible to resist. But what really scares many parents on Halloween is something entirely prosaic and yet altogether necessary: dinner.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | October 31, 2007
foodallergy.org This site from the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network has lots of information on food allergies, including alerts about ingredients in foods and a page of Halloween safety tips to keep kids with allergies safe while trick-or-treating.
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