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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | October 18, 1993
Marylanders have a love affair with the Chesapeake Bay, but we all too often ignore its appendages -- the rivers that flow into the bay. Without those tributaries, the bay would be a very different and much less fascinating body of water.The rivers supply the bay with fresh water, which mixes with salt water from the Atlantic Ocean to support a rich variety of fish and plants. The rivers, and their tributaries, are where the fish spawn and where juvenile crabs go to grow up. And, if truth be told, the rivers touch us much more directly than the bay itself.
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By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
For some people, environmentalism is a lifelong passion. That would be true of Michael Beer, retired biophysics professor at Johns Hopkins University, who died Friday at age 88.  He was devoted to protecting and restoring the Jones Falls, the stream that runs through the heart of Baltimore, as well as one of its most popular tributaries, Stony Run. Rallying others to his cause, he founded the Jones Falls Watershed Association, which later merged...
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SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | April 11, 1991
Mow the lawn or head down to virtually any tidal tributary, where fat white perch are being taken from holes along the shoreline. It is an easy choice, really.The grass will still be there, but once the spawn is complete, the perch will flee downstream.Warm weather will do that -- make the grass grow and the fish bite.Fishing is good throughout most of the state in freshwater and tidal tributaries.Crappie fishing is good at Loch Raven, Rocky Gorge and Liberty reservoirs, as well as at Unicorn and Centennial lakes, the Patapsco valley ponds and Tuckahoe Lake.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 5, 2013
Extreme rainfall, totaling two inches in 24-hours, caused a sewage overflow Thursday at the wastewater treatment plant at the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, the Army said Friday. An estimated 3,000 gallons of partially treated sewage overflowed from the secondary clarifier tanks at the plant and flowed into King's Creek and the Bush River, according to a media release form the APG Public Affairs Office. Bush River flows into the Chesapeake Bay. Lime was applied to the affected area and signs were posted indicating "No Fishing, No Crabbing, No shellfish harvesting, No Swimming, in the area until further notice," the Army said.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
Boaters on the Magothy and South rivers will have to slow down on some tributaries starting in two weeks.New 6-knot speed limits take effect June 8 as part of much-debated river management plans that have pitted waterfront residents against water skiers.The state Department of Natural Resources yesterday announced the new limits -- some of which will be enforced only on weekends or holidays or during the April 15 to Oct. 15 boating season -- along with minimum wake speed limits in other tributaries.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | May 17, 1991
A mysterious illness is attacking the carp and catfish in the tributaries of the upper Chesapeake Bay, killing some and leaving others sick with kidney damage and bulging eyes.But so far, biologists with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources haven't figured out whether the cause of the sickness is some natural disease or toxic contamination.Officials have been getting reports of problems for several years, but this winter and spring biologists began a more in-depth look for the cause and have collected samples of fish tissue as well as water and mud from the bottom of rivers.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
Chesapeake Bay tributaries in the Baltimore area closed 20 years ago to protect the dwindling yellow perch population might soon be opened to recreational anglers under a blueprint being prepared by state natural resources officials. The proposal, more than 10 years in the making, is a series of mix-and-match options for anglers and commercial fishermen that covers season length, size of catch and which waterways should remain closed. The plan is in its final days of drafting, with representatives of the recreational and commercial communities weighing in. A public comment period begins next month.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1996
Yellow perch fishing has been as fickle as the weather this year, with sporadic activity during the warm spells and virtually no activity when the cold weather returns.But perhaps by next weekend, if the weather runs to more normal patterns this week, the yellow perch will begin running in concentrations to and from their spawning grounds near the heads of tidal tributaries.For several years, fishing for yellow perch has been a changing business, depending on which body of water was being fished.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | December 4, 1992
Maryland Save our Streams is mapping stream banks, fish barriers and other potential problems along four Patuxent River tributaries in Anne Arundel as part of a seven-county study of the waterway.County officials are to pay the Glen Burnie-based agency $22,500 from a state Department of Natural Resources grant for the surveys of Towsers Branch, Dorsey Run, Davidsonville Branch and Kings Branch.County planners need the data to decide where to put storm water controls and evaluate the effect of land-use and zoning practices on water quality, said Meo Curtis, of the county Office of Planning and Zoning.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2003
At least once a day, Eileen McLellan gets a phone call from a homeowner along the Chester River, wondering about the dead fish washing up under the dock or the funny color of the algae or just the strange smell of the water. "They call me and ask if the river is dying," said McLellan, who is completing her first year as the Chester Riverkeeper, hired by the Chester River Association. "I tell them it's not dying, but it's very sick." Around the Chesapeake Bay, zones of low dissolved oxygen are increasingly found far beyond the deep waters of the main channel.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
A broken sewer line in Catonsville that went undetected for three weeks after the storm called Sandy passed through the area poured nearly 1.3 million gallons of raw waste into a tributary of the Patapsco River, Baltimore County officials reported Wednesday. County workers discovered the spill Tuesday on the grounds of Spring Grove Hospital Center after a neighboring resident complained about sewage odors to the Maryland Department of the Environment, which relayed the information, according to David Fidler, spokesman for the county's Department of Public Works.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 29, 2012
The fate of the Chesapeake Bay may be found in its tributaries. Mattawoman Creek, one of the bay's healthiest, is losing ground to development and now stands "at a turning point" as Charles County plans for future growth in its watershed, a state-led task force warns. The combined state-federal task force, led by the Department of Natural Resources , says that the Mattawoman is losing the "near to the ideal" condition that characterized its waters nearly two decades ago. Although its watershed is still largely forested, and the stream itself retains one of the state's most diverse populations of fish, "possible signs of stress associated with human development have appeared.
NEWS
May 27, 2011
Maryland is a funny looking state. It's a pistol-shaped land mass with a weird barrel kindly pointing at West Virginia. We are a funny looking state mostly because of the watery mass that splits us. The Chesapeake Bay is our treasure. It is Maryland. Bays are complicated thing-a-majigs. The streams and tributaries that stretch for miles around the bay are also connected to major polluters, and it is this connection that pollutes the tributaries and the bay. Maryland should be proud of its weird shape and of its bay and tributaries.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2010
Male smallmouth bass with female traits have turned up in the Susquehanna River, the second major Chesapeake Bay tributary where "intersex" fish have been detected. A federal scientist said Tuesday she's investigating whether the abnormality could be linked to farm or consumer chemicals getting into the river. More than 90 percent of adult male bass examined in the Susquehanna in the past year had immature egg cells in their testes, said Vicki Blazer, a fishery biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2010
— The Obama administration's beefed-up plan to revive the Chesapeake Bay would toughen regulations on developers and farmers, preserve 2 million more acres of the watershed and give the public hundreds of new places to gain access to the bay and its tributaries. Federal officials said the plan, unveiled Wednesday, would jump-start the lagging cleanup effort and hold all levels of government accountable for bringing vitality back to "a national treasure." It calls for stricter enforcement of pollution laws, taking aim at the bay's biggest source of pollution: runoff of fertilizer and animal manure.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
Chesapeake Bay tributaries in the Baltimore area closed 20 years ago to protect the dwindling yellow perch population might soon be opened to recreational anglers under a blueprint being prepared by state natural resources officials. The proposal, more than 10 years in the making, is a series of mix-and-match options for anglers and commercial fishermen that covers season length, size of catch and which waterways should remain closed. The plan is in its final days of drafting, with representatives of the recreational and commercial communities weighing in. A public comment period begins next month.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1999
The estimated 200,000 yellow perch, menhaden, mummichogs and silverside that died in the upper reaches of Magothy and Patapsco rivers' tributaries in the past week represent the worst such fish kill in 10 years, state officials said yesterday.And unless the weather changes, the fish kills will only get worse, said Charles Poukish, environmental specialist for the state Department of Natural Resources.The kill is another indication of a Chesapeake Bay ecosystem "living on the edge of severe problems," added Robert Magnien, DNR's chief of resource assessments.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2002
Baltimore will launch an experiment this winter to try to halt a problem that disgusts tourists and drives away residents: the rafts of stomach-turning trash that wash into the harbor during heavy rains. The city's Department of Public Works plans to spend about $2.5 million installing three sets of trash-collection nets across tributaries to the Gwynns Falls, which dumps pollutants into the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River. If the pilot program works, public works officials would like to spend millions more building trash-catchers across the Jones Falls and dozens of other streams that pour storm water into the Inner Harbor, said William Stack, chief of the department's water quality management section.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Kevin Rector,Sun reporter | July 14, 2008
Thousands of acres along the shore of the Chesapeake Bay and five of its largest tributaries in Maryland have been targeted by a national land conservation group as part of a long-term plan to buy individual parcels and turn them into one of the nation's largest systems of open spaces, public parks and water-access points. The Trust for Public Land, which has preserved more than 8,000 acres of open space in the state since 1985 and played a key role in the recent creation of the 14-mile Gwynns Falls Trail in Baltimore, has identified miles of undeveloped land along the western shore of the Chesapeake and throughout the Gunpowder, Patuxent, Patapsco, Potomac and Susquehanna river systems that it wants to help state and local governments, conservation groups and private donors to preserve.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Reporter | December 9, 2007
CAMBRIDGE -- It looked like just another beautiful day on the water as Bill Dennison and his crew of biologists pushed off from their pier at the Horn Point Laboratory and sailed toward the mouth of the Choptank River. The sun glistened on the waves. In the distance, craggy, tree-lined peninsulas carved the river into jagged coves that have long been home to crabs and rockfish. But there were hardly any fishing boats. In fact, hardly anyone was on the river at all. It soon became clear why. The researchers passed large patches of brownish-white foam - so-called "mahogany tides" where the water is so thick with algae that no light can get through.
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