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NEWS
March 6, 1991
Since Iraq invaded Kuwait last August, there have been reports of atrocities -- from the rape, torture and killing of Kuwaiti citizens, to the allied bombing of Iraqi civilians, to the subsequent vengeful attacks on Iraqi soldiers.Of 373 readers of The Evening Sun and other callers to SUNDIAL, 335, or 89 percent, said that as part of the cease-fire, a war-crimes tribunal should be established to investigate these reported atrocities.Of 371 callers, 339, or 91 percent, said that all acts of barbarism on all sides in the war should not be forgiven and forgotten.
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BUSINESS
By Robert Channick, Tribune Newspapers | August 4, 2014
Tribune Co. completed the spinoff Monday of Tribune Publishing Co., which includes The Baltimore Sun and nine other daily newspapers. Tribune is just the latest multimedia news company to split up its broadcasting and publishing assets, joining Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. and E.W. Scripps, which completed such a spinoff just last week. Such separation is gaining momentum as traditional media seek to adapt to the fast-evolving digital landscape. An amicable corporate divorce is generally seen as best for both sides, streamlining them to compete against new media behemoths such as Google.
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By Shannon McCaffrey and Shannon McCaffrey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - The rules of evidence are still being written. There's no witness protection program. Forget impartial judges - the violent insurgency in Iraq has made it difficult to find them at all. And those who have been recruited are so fearful of retribution that their identities are being shielded. The fledgling Iraqi Special Tribunal is facing an uphill climb as it prepares to try Saddam Hussein on charges of war crimes and genocide from his more than two decades in power. "There are enormous obstacles confronting this tribunal," says Richard Dicker, the head of the International Justice Program for the New York-based Human Rights Watch.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | May 21, 2014
The owner of The Baltimore Sun wants to find partners to develop about 37 acres of unused land next to the newspaper's printing plant in Port Covington. The plans are part of a broader push by Tribune Company to make more money from its real estate. Earlier this month, Tribune announced plans to sell the former Columbia Flier building to Howard County for $2.8 million. It also is working to sell property in Bel Air and in Greenwood Village, Colorado, according to financial statements.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | October 21, 1994
London -- The first international war-crimes investigation since the post-World War II Nuremberg and Tokyo began last Friday. A Bosnian Serb, Duscan Tadic, arrested in Germany, is being accused of killing, raping, beating and torturing Croats and Muslims during ''ethnic cleansing'' in northwestern Bosnia.Mr. Tadic isn't one of the big fish. It is unlikely that a big fish would make the mistake of traveling abroad to where he might be arrested. Big fish, moreover, are likely to bargain their signatures for an amnesty if a peace agreement should ever come.
NEWS
August 7, 2008
The U.S. government got a guilty verdict yesterday in its prosecution of Osama bin Laden's driver in the first war crimes trial since World War II. But it's a hollow victory because the military tribunal system, as shaped by the Bush administration, remains a flawed instrument of the war on terror that contravenes the principles of American justice. A jury of six military officers convicted Salim Hamdan of "material support" for terrorism, the lesser of the two charges against him but one broad enough to easily ensnare a small-time player such as the Yemeni.
NEWS
November 2, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for the Rev. James A. McEnerney, S.J., a judge of the Archdiocesan Tribunal and a former treasurer of Loyola College, will be offered at 11 a.m. today at St. Ignatius Roman Catholic Church, Calvert and Madison streets.Father McEnerney, who was 77, died Tuesday at the Jesuit Provincial residence after a heart attack.He joined the tribunal, which decides cases brought under canon law, as a research consultant in 1969. He became a defender of the bond in 1974 and was named a judge in 1981.
NEWS
September 8, 1998
JEAN-PAUL Akayesu was neither the biggest nor smallest fish in the Hutu genocide machine that tried to wipe out Rwandan Tutsis in 1994.A mayor caught up in the madness of superiors, he was found guilty by three judges after an international tribunal's trial lasting from Jan. 9, 1997, to Sept. 2, 1998. He is guilty on nine counts of genocide, crimes against humanity, rape, murder and torture. The 300-page judgment links him to the deaths of 2,000 people.Jean-Paul Akayesu has made history. He is the first person convicted of genocide, a half-century after the world ratified that as a crime to be judged and punished.
NEWS
By Hictor Tobar and Sam Enriquez and Hictor Tobar and Sam Enriquez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 29, 2006
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico's top electoral court announced yesterday that a partial recount of the votes in this country's disputed presidential election found no evidence of widespread fraud, a ruling that placed conservative Felipe Calderon tantalizingly close to victory. In a 7-0 ruling, the Federal Electoral Tribunal said it had found only minor mathematical and administrative errors in the initial vote count of the July 2 election. The tribunal said yesterday that its recount subtracted just 4,183 votes from Calderon's margin of victory, reducing it to about 240,000 over leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador.
NEWS
By RICHARD BOUDREAUX and RICHARD BOUDREAUX,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 15, 2006
MEXICO CITY -- Each morning, the seven judges who will decide Mexico's disputed presidential election are chauffeured into their gated office compound past a crowd of Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's angry supporters. "Where are our votes -- in the garbage?" asks one of the banners demanding that the Federal Electoral Tribunal overturn Felipe Calderon's narrow victory in the July 2 vote and certify Lopez Obrador as president-elect. It is 10 years since the tribunal was created to police an electoral system long marred by blatant fraud.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
David Simon shares his feelings about the possibility of the Koch brothers owning Tribune papers like the Baltimore Sun in a video interview that you can see here . The interview was done at the request of the Working Families Party, according to Simon, who was once a reporter at the Sun. "When I heard that the Koch brothers, bless their hearts, were interested in purchasing newspapers, the Baltimore Sun, my alma mater, in particular, I...
BUSINESS
By Robert Channick and The Chicago Tribune | July 10, 2013
One week after boosting its broadcasting holdings with the announcement of a deal to purchase 19 television stations,  Tribune Co. said Wednesday morning it intends to spin off its publishing business into a separate company.   The move would separate Tribune Co.'s publishing assets, including the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, The Baltimore Sun and five other daily newspapers, from the Chicago-based media company's more profitable broadcasting holdings,...
BUSINESS
By Robert Channick, Tribune Newspapers | February 26, 2013
Tribune Co. has hired two investment banks to manage offers to buy its newspapers, executives said Tuesday, adding that no decisions have been made about whether to sell any properties. JPMorgan Chase and Evercore Partners will oversee a process to consider offers for Tribune Co.'s publishing assets, including The Baltimore Sun, Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times and five other newspapers. JPMorgan is an owner of Tribune Co. “There is a lot of interest in our newspapers, which we haven't solicited,” Gary Weitman, Tribune Co. spokesman, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Robert Channick, Tribune reporter | January 17, 2013
Television executive Peter Liguori was named the new chief executive of Tribune Co. Thursday, taking the reins of the reorganized Chicago-based media company weeks after its emergence from bankruptcy. In a widely expected announcement, Liguori, 52, a former top executive at Fox Broadcasting and Discovery Communications, was confirmed by Tribune Co.'s new seven-member board, which met for the first time Thursday in Los Angeles. Tribune Co. owns The Baltimore Sun. "It can be daunting; I tend to view it as being exciting," Liguori said in an interview about his new job. "It's just a company of tremendous media assets with big iconic brand names, and many of those names are in major markets.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2013
At the end of 2007, real estate tycoon Sam Zell took control of Tribune Co. in a deal that promised to re-energize the media conglomerate. But the company, which owns The Baltimore Sun, struggled under the huge debt burden the deal created, and less than a year later, it filed for bankruptcy. One of Chicago's most iconic companies - parent to the Chicago Tribune  - was propelled into a protracted and in many ways unprecedented odyssey through Chapter 11 reorganization. On Dec. 31, after four years, Tribune Co. finally emerged from court protection under new ownership, but at a heavy cost.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2013
Somewhere in the third year of Tribune Co.'s marathon Chapter 11 proceeding, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Kevin Carey looked out at a Delaware courtroom packed with high-priced attorneys and conceded the case had broken down into what he called a "multiconstituent melee. " "The parties are represented by some of the best lawyers in the field," he said. "You know how to fight well ... but nobody ends up the better for it, really. " Carey was trying to make a point about the foundation of bankruptcy law, which recognizes that a company and its creditors are better off hammering out a settlement than fighting endless court battles.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 17, 2004
MIAMI - The Pentagon's chief prosecutor has quietly called for three of six colonels to be removed from the panel judging war crimes cases at Guantanamo - a move that could call into question the Bush administration's plan for trying suspects in the war on terror. Army Col. Robert Swann made the surprise request Sept. 7. It was made public this week. Swann agreed with defense lawyers that the three officers are unsuitable to act as judge and jury in the cases. One key issue is whether U.S. military officers who helped capture the alleged terrorists could be impartial.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A veteran al-Qaida operative has confessed to being the mastermind of the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole, as well as a key conduit between Osama bin Laden and a terrorist cell in East Africa, according to a transcript of a military tribunal hearing released yesterday by the Pentagon. The transcript was the fourth from the hearings the military is holding in private for 14 high-value terror suspects who were kept in secret CIA prisons before they were sent last fall to the U.S. facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
BUSINESS
By Michael Oneal and Steve Mills, Chicago Tribune reporters | January 14, 2013
When Bank of America credit officer Dan Petrik and his team sat down in early 2007 to analyze Sam Zell's plan to take control of Tribune Co., their numbers showed that the complex deal failed to meet five of the bank's 10 lending guidelines. There was too much borrowed money, too little collateral and the overall risk rating that BofA assigned to the transaction was below what the bank liked to see, according to its preliminary analysis. Petrik had never worked on a deal so weighed down by debt.
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