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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | October 1, 2012
We like tribalism for the same reason we like to eat fatty foods: We evolved that way. Homo sapiens didn't survive long on the African savannas as rugged individualists. Alone, they couldn't scare away the scarier animals and, for the most part, they couldn't catch or kill the tastier ones. But in groups, humans rose to the top of the food chain thousands of years ago and have been passing down their tribe-loving genes ever since. Customs and practices that ensured the survival of the species were worked out through trial and error and passed from one generation to another.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
What we have in "Tribes," the agitated and absorbing play by Nina Raine receiving its Baltimore premiere at Everyman Theatre, isn't a failure to communicate. It's a stubborn, even proud, refusal to communicate. While four members of a well-educated London family speak over and through one another, wounding and goading as they go, the fifth does what he can to keep up, to fit in, or just stay out of the way. He's Billy, the youngest child, born deaf into a hearing family - not a listening family, mind you, just a hearing one. Billy's parents reason that their son is better off not being defined by his deafness, not being assimilated into the deaf community, which would only make him feel more handicapped.
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BUSINESS
By John Holland and John Holland,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | January 9, 2007
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The Seminole Tribe's purchase of the Hard Rock Cafe International chain won approval yesterday, a month after the $965 million deal was announced and despite a lawsuit by the Cordish Co. of Baltimore. Shareholders of Rank Group, LLC of London approved the sale with a "show of hands" at a special meeting, Rank executives said in statement. The outcome was expected despite allegations made in a recent lawsuit accusing the tribe and others of rigging the bid in favor of the Seminoles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Many a play deals with language and communication. There is always theatrical ore to be mined in the way people express themselves - or fail to - and how that can complicate so many things in life. British playwright Nina Raine gives the subject an unusual spin in "Tribes," a 2010 work about a young deaf man named Billy, born into a hearing family full of people who communicate all too crassly or ineptly with one another. This funny and touching play, which Everyman Theatre is staging for its season-closing production, features an actor deeply familiar with its central issues.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | October 12, 1993
The Locklears of the Lumbee are like a tribe within a tribe.They are a vast group of people united by a single surname, though not necessarily by blood. Anywhere there are Lumbees, there are Locklears.Archie Lynch, the cultural director at the American Indian Center in East Baltimore, estimates that "easily 20 to 30 percent" of Lumbees carry the Locklear surname.That's just his educated guess. Ruth Locklear, the keeper of the Lumbee tribal rolls in Pembroke, N.C., checked and came up with 19 percent Locklears.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2004
An Oklahoma Indian tribe is the latest group interested in developing a landfill on a 481-acre parcel near Odenton -- a project neighbors and Anne Arundel officials have opposed for more than a decade. County officials said they're also concerned the tribe might attempt to open a gambling facility on the land, though the Delaware Nation of Anadarko, Okla., has not indicated such plans. County Executive Janet S. Owens sent a letter to the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs last week criticizing the proposed purchase by the Delaware Nation.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A Native American tribe from Idaho plans to announce next week the creation of potentially the largest lottery in the nation, setting the stage for a battle with states that fear their own lotteries will suffer.The National Indian Lottery will be operated by the Coeur d'Alene tribe and Unistar Entertainment Inc., a Denver management firm.The lottery will be available through an "800" telephone number in 36 states -- including Maryland, Delaware and Virginia -- and the District of Columbia.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,SUN COLUMNIST | October 9, 1997
Just before last night's game, some guy with a "Get Nasty/Clobber Cleveland" placard got in-your-face with longtime, long-suffering Indians fan John Majewski, red-eyed from the 10-hour bus trip to Baltimore. "Oh, nice," Majewski hollered. "Real nice. We come all the way down here to boost your failing economy and that's what we get? What's up with that, man?"But that's as far as the confrontation went. It never got nasty. The guy with the placard scooted. Majewski, even with big arms from heavy lifting at Universal Metal Products in Wickliffe, Ohio, knew not to push his luck, anyway.
BUSINESS
By Jon Burstein and Jon Burstein,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | April 18, 2007
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The Seminole Tribe of Florida and the Baltimore-based developer of its two Hard Rock hotel and casino complexes settled a multimillion-dollar federal lawsuit yesterday, ending a 10-month legal fight. The terms were unclear last night, but the tentative agreement reached in March was for $756 million. Initial terms called for the tribe to pay $231 million -- in $10.5 million annual payments for 22 years -- and lend an additional $525 million to Cordish Co. and its affiliate, Power Plant Entertainment.
NEWS
By Timothy Egan and Timothy Egan,New York Times News Service | December 8, 1991
SILETZ, Ore. -- Deep inside the coastal forest of Oregon, a small American Indian tribe is building the reservation of the future.After clearing a swath in the woods, the Siletz Indians have constructed a new community of big homes and broad streets. Unemployment is well below the national average. Drugs and alcohol are not allowed.And the budget, enriched by tribal businesses and a portfolio of outside investments, is showing a healthy surplus.But what is most remarkable about the Siletz is the simple fact that they exist, still holding millennium-old ties to this land.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
If you want to feel good again about what's possible for public television, don't miss “Coming Back with Wes Moore,” which airs Tuesday night on Maryland Public Television. At a time in American life when we are seeing reports of veterans dying while waiting months and even years for basic care at Veterans Affairs hospitals, this documentary about soldiers returning to civilian life after combat in Iraq and Afghanistan is timely and deeply touching. The best-selling Baltimore author, who served as a combat officer in Afghanistan, sets out to chronicle the stories of veterans who have survived the battlefield, in some cases only to face even deadlier challenges at home.
FEATURES
By Jada Vanderpool, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Following religious values taught as a youth can be difficult for many when entering adulthood, but Charm City Tribe, a two-year-old program in the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore, aspires to reconnect people in their 20s and 30s to Judaic practices they may have lost along the road to independence. Local families funded a three-year grant initiative to reach non-Orthodox young Jewish adults and generate positive attitudes toward Jewish culture. Director of the program Rabbi Jessy Gross organizes events to connect the community and works individually with young people to help them identify their stances on Judaism.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 14, 2014
"If all you have is a hammer," the old saying goes, "everything looks like a nail. " Left unsaid is the fact that the real problem isn't the possession of a hammer, but the certitude that all you need is the hammer. In other words, it's a failure of the imagination -- which is a kind of arrogance -- that's really to blame. "I've got my hammer, and that's all I need. Besides, have you ever seen a problem that didn't look like a nail?" This is a version of what academics call "confirmation bias" -- the tendency to accept only the facts that buttress your closely held views.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
We start out tonight with the Brain tribe, post-Tribal Council. Spencer is super happy and grateful that he's still around. Kass and Tasha agree that if they had kept J'tia, they'd be back at Tribal Council in another three days. That's true. The three agree that they will stick together and be the final three, and they only have to get rid of two entire other tribes to do it. Brain gets Treemail, and a sweet reward is implied. Tasha and Kass are glad they decided to keep Spencer, since they didn't have a chance of winning anything if they kept J'tia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | March 13, 2014
Back from Tribal Council where Brice was voted out, Morgan is pissed that Jeremiah didn't vote with her. She does her best to throw him under the bus, stating in front of everyone that he was the one to come to her about getting rid of Alexis. Which may have been true, but then Morgan takes it even further, claiming Jeremiah wanted to get LJ out because he's a threat, but I don't think that's true. Over at the Brain tribe, they get Treemail with a clue about the upcoming challenge.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2014
It was going to be Jerrelle Benimon's show. Towson's star forward knew it, his coach knew it and much of the announced crowd of 4,051 at Baltimore Arena probably sensed it as well. Seeking to advance to its first-ever Colonial Athletic Association tournament championship game and take the next big step in the program's revival, second-seeded Towson trailed William and Mary throughout Sunday night's second half. “It's about to get ugly,” Benimon, the two-time CAA Player of the Year, shouted to no one in particular as he ran back on defense after converting a difficult shot with 12:01 left.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Navajo Nation, one of the largest Indian tribes in the United States, is considering changing its name to one that better reflects its cultural roots.TC negative stereotype of them as "aggressive, war-like figures.""We're not like that," said Mr. Norsgod. "We're a gentle people who just want to be known for what we are."Carl Shaw, a spokesman for the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington, said that while Navajos have discussed a name change in the past, this is the first time the idea is being taken seriously.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | November 29, 2007
The sudden rise of Mike Huckabee in the Republican jousts is a cool plot turn, one that makes you lean forward and turn up the sound. An amiable, well-spoken Southern conservative with a Gomer Pyle face challenging the teeth-baring Rudolph W. Giuliani and the sleek Mitt Romney. You watch him field questions for a few minutes and the man's appeal is pretty clear. He comes off as a real person, not a caricature: He sounds like a guy talking to you, not a stiff with a set of applause lines.
SPORTS
By Paul Tierney and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
The game started a half hour late and most of fans had already left Baltimore Arena after hometown-favorite Towson finished playing. But the fans who did stick around to watch No. 3 seed William and Mary's matchup with the No. 6 seed College of Charleston in Saturday's fourth and final Colonial Athletic Association quarterfinal game saw the biggest comeback of the day. Despite falling behind by 15 points in the first half, the Tribe rallied back...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
We open this week at the Brain tribe after Tribal Council, where Spencer is reeling after Garrett has been voted off. J'tia is just glad that she's still around, but I don't think that she will be for long. Kass and Tasha think that they'll keep her around for an alliance of girls, but I think that they'll get sick of her before then. Over at Crazytown, also known as wherever Tony is, he decides to come clean to Sarah about being a cop, since there was really no point in him lying about it in the first place.
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