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By Afzal Khan | March 2, 2010
F inally, after eight years, the U.S. military in Afghanistan is acknowledging the fact that the war there is more against a Pashtun tribal insurgency than against an offshoot of al-Qaeda. In support of this belated realization, there is now evidence of military funding for several research projects aimed at understanding the culture of the Pashtun tribes and what is needed to win them over. The success, however, of this changed perception will rest on the Obama administration's flexibility to accept the historical reality that the concept of jihad among Pashtuns, which is fueling this insurgency, is closely tied to external interventions.
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SPORTS
By John Altavilla and Tribune Newspapers | August 6, 2014
History tells us the first documented version of lacrosse was played by native tribes inhabiting North America in the 1630s. Legend says the rules of the ancient sport were devised to help sharpen the focus, dexterity and courage of young warriors. Needless to say, much has changed over the past four centuries with a sport whose popularity seems to grow each year, especially in the wealthier suburbs where kids play it and parents watch it. But it was certainly intuition and opportunity that led the Mohegan Sun's Tribal Gaming Authority to pursue the sport's indoor professional league as a tenant for its arena, home of concerts and basketball games.
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SPORTS
September 18, 1991
Tribal Crown set the pace early in yesterday's Straight Face allowance feature at Pimlico and drew off to win in 1 minute, 43 3/5 seconds over 1 1/16 miles on turf.Ridden by leading jockey Michael Luzzi and trained by Virgil "Buddy" Raines, Tribal Crown paid $5.40, $3.80 and $3.40. Chuck Sails, under Marco Casteneda, was second, 2 1/2 lengths back, and paid $3.80 and $2.80. Half Gavvo ran third for $3 with Edgar Prado up. The 1-7 exacta paid $22.20.The double-triple carry-over topped six figures yesterday and will be $110,889.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
State regulators have ordered a South Dakota-based payday lender to stop making consumer loans in Maryland after finding the company used predatory tactics and charged excessive interest rates. Western Sky Financial, located on a reservation in Timber Lake, S.D., has said it was not required to follow Maryland law because of tribal immunity, according to the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation. The labor department's Division of Financial Regulation said Thursday it has issued a final cease and desist order against Western Sky, its owner Martin Webb and other related parties.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Traditionally, when American Indians are killed in battle, their remains are returned to their tribal lands for burial. But for the families of the many Native Americans who join the U.S. military, death brings a difficult choice: The veterans can be buried in a national veterans' cemetery with fellow comrades in arms. Or, they can be buried close to home on tribal land. There is no way to do both. The Native American Veterans Cemetery Act would change that. Rep. Tom Udall, the New Mexico Democrat who wrote the bill, said it would authorize states to provide grants financed by the Department of Veterans Affairs for the development or improvement of veterans' cemeteries on tribal land.
NEWS
By Stephen Franklin and Stephen Franklin,Chicago Tribune | March 7, 1993
TRIBES: HOW RACE, RELIGION AND IDENTITY DETERMIN SUCCESS IN THE NEW GLOBAL ECONOMY.Joel Kotkin.Random House.343 pages. $24.Not far from downtown Tel Aviv sits a ruling palace of the world diamond trade, where the industry's pulse is endlessly monitored, analyzed and acted on.Geography has nothing to do with the Diamond Center's location in the heart of the Jewish state. Geography, indeed, is a good reason why it might not have flourished in a place that has been so isolated at times by wars and hostile neighbors.
NEWS
By Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King and Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 17, 2008
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- A missile strike destroyed the compound of a suspected militant leader in Pakistan's tribal belt yesterday, killing at least 18 people, officials and residents said. The Pakistani military disavowed responsibility for the strike in the South Waziristan tribal agency, raising the possibility that it was carried out by U.S. forces. American military officials in neighboring Afghanistan had no immediate comment, though U.S. troops are believed to have carried out similar attacks in recent months.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 25, 1998
DIEPSLOOT, South Africa -- Fanie Soni sits in judgment of his neighbors in this squatter camp of 26,000 impoverished shack-dwellers north of Johannesburg.He has no legal qualifications, no training and is unemployed. But he is the first rung on the ladder of justice here.He sits in the community court, an informal forum approved by the community, tolerated by the police and about to be legalized by the government of President Nelson Mandela.The Justice Department wants community courts like this one to be officially recognized as an affordable, accessible and acceptable way of dealing with minor crimes and social problems.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A new and classified U.S. military proposal outlines an intensified effort to enlist tribal leaders in the frontier areas of Pakistan in the fight against al-Qaida and the Taliban as part of a broader effort to bolster Pakistani forces against an expanding militancy, U.S. military officials said. If adopted, the proposal would join elements of a shift in strategy that would likely expand the presence of U.S. military trainers in Pakistan, directly finance a separate tribal paramilitary force that until now has proved largely ineffective, and pay militias that agreed to fight al-Qaida and foreign extremists, officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- By all appearances, Sheik Ghazi Mashal Ajil Al-Yawer seems well suited to the presidency of the interim Iraqi government, a largely ceremonial post. His robust figure, flowing white robes and rimless eyeglasses -- together with a well-groomed mustache -- give him a regal air. But from statements he has made while on the Iraqi Governing Council and the influence he wields through his tribal position, Yawer does not appear to be the sort to content himself with presiding over parades and welcoming visiting dignitaries.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 14, 2012
There's a long back-story to Maryland's official recognition of the Piscataway as a distinct tribe of Native American people, and it's not pretty. Last week's announcement of the long-sought declaration in Annapolis marked an end to both the state's stubborn refusal to recognize any native tribe - largely to stop its members from opening a casino here - and to a dispute between Piscataway groups that got so bitter, they even bickered over bones. In the 1990s, Maryland and other states went through the process of removing native bones from museums and offering them for reburial.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
Basir Jamil expressed himself eloquently in his article "Growing up Muslim" (Sept. 12). I'm sure he echoes the sentiments of many other Muslim-Americans. His analogy, that blaming Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all Christians for the KKK, had both substance and point. When I consider discrimination in the United States, two thoughts emerge. Evolution worked to produce an intense, natural inclination in human beings to separate themselves into coalitions; us against them.
NEWS
April 7, 2010
WILMA MANKILLER, 64 Former Cherokee Nation chief Former Cherokee Nation Chief Wilma Mankiller has died after battling pancreatic cancer. The Tahlequah, Okla.-based tribe says Ms. Mankiller died Tuesday morning. Ms. Mankiller was one of the few women ever to lead a major American Indian tribe. As the first female chief of the Cherokees, from 1985 to 1995, she led the tribe in tripling its enrollment, doubling employment and building health centers and children's programs.
NEWS
By John A. McCary | March 18, 2010
The Iraqi parliamentary elections last week highlight one very important lesson about tribal engagement in counterinsurgencies: It works. Voter turnout in Sunni tribal provinces such as Anbar and Diyala -- formerly hotbeds of the insurgency -- topped out at 70 percent. Among the long list of newly formed political parties vying for seats in parliament, more than a few boasted openly tribal affiliations. Tribal outreach was also a major component of coalition forming for major Shiite candidates, including Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and Ayad Allawi, proving that tribal engagement can work across sectarian lines.
NEWS
By Afzal Khan | March 2, 2010
F inally, after eight years, the U.S. military in Afghanistan is acknowledging the fact that the war there is more against a Pashtun tribal insurgency than against an offshoot of al-Qaeda. In support of this belated realization, there is now evidence of military funding for several research projects aimed at understanding the culture of the Pashtun tribes and what is needed to win them over. The success, however, of this changed perception will rest on the Obama administration's flexibility to accept the historical reality that the concept of jihad among Pashtuns, which is fueling this insurgency, is closely tied to external interventions.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 13, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - For the six months he helped execute the "hearts and minds" outreach of the United States in one of the most dangerous front lines of the American battle against militants, Stephen D. Vance had to balance a strategic mission with nearly daily concerns about his personal safety. Yesterday, as he was arriving at his office in a residential area of turbulent Peshawar, he was shot and killed by gunmen, becoming the most prominent casualty of an increasingly troubled effort to use economic aid to undercut the hold of al-Qaida and the Taliban on Pakistan's tribal areas.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A Pakistani Taliban leader who is waging a government-backed campaign to evict Central Asian militants from Pakistan's tribal regions said yesterday that he would give Osama bin Laden sanctuary in his area if he sought it. "Bin Laden has never come to this area, but if he comes here and seeks our protection, then according to tribal laws and customs we will protect him," the Taliban commander, Mullah Muhammad Nazir, 32, told journalists...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 14, 2008
ZIARAT, Pakistan - The mountain of white marble shines with such brilliance in the sun it looks like snow. For four years, the quarry beneath it lay dormant, its riches captive to tribal squabbles and government ineptitude in this corner of Pakistan's tribal areas. But in April, the Taliban appeared and imposed a firm hand. They settled the feud between the tribes, demanded a fat fee upfront and a tax on every truck that ferried the treasure from the quarry. Since then, Mir Zaman, a contractor from the Masaud subtribe, which was picked by the Taliban to run the quarry, has watched contentedly as his trucks roll out of the quarry with colossal boulders bound for refining in nearby towns.
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