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By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | November 29, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- The Court of Special Appeals overturned yesterday the murder conviction of a Baltimore man, who already was on parole for a previous murder, because of remarks the trial judge made in the presence of the jury.Those comments by Baltimore Circuit Judge Elsbeth L. Bothe were "so egregious, so inflammatory" that the court was forced to reverse the conviction of Warren A. Waddell, 38, Judge Paul E. Alpert wrote for the three-judge panel.The ruling marks the third time in two years that the intermediate appellate court has chastised Judge Bothe for comments she made from the bench.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
A federal appeals judge recently took aim at the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' use of fictitious drug robbery schemes to secure lengthy prison sentences for would-be rip off crews, strongly criticizing the practice in a written opinion. The so-called reverse stings follow a pattern: An informant or undercover agent poses as a disgruntled courier and invites a group of people to rob his employer of a half-million dollars or so worth of drugs. But Judge Stephen Reinhardt wrote that such tactics raise important issues about wealth inequality in the United States and whom authorities decide to pursue.
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1994
Prosecutors won't be able to portray James Gregory Martin at his automobile-manslaughter trial as a reckless driver who often drove into oncoming traffic while traveling the county's back roads, a Carroll Circuit judge has ruled.In an order filed yesterday, Carroll Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold said testimony that would support such a portrayal was inadmissible. The order said Mr. Martin's alleged bad driving in the past was irrelevant at his trial on two counts of automobile manslaughter.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
A city judge declined Thursday to order a new trial for the man found guilty of killing an 11-year-old girl in Northwest Baltimore more than four decades ago, a victory for prosecutors who sought to prevent the release of another high-profile perpetrator under a court ruling that has freed dozens of convicted murderers. The decision means Wayne Stephen Young will remain in prison for the 1969 abduction and death of Esther Lebowitz, a case that has kept the city's Jewish community on edge through years of appeals and challenges.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | October 17, 1991
The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld the criminal convictions of Baltimore defense lawyer Neil W. Steinhorn and local pawnbroker Eugene Petasky, saying the trial judge did not err in making several rulings that affected evidence and the jury's verdicts.A three-judge appellate panel ruled, on one key issue, that authorities did not entrap Steinhorn when he laundered money through a Caribbean bank and converted stolen gold to cash through Petasky's Metro Brokers pawn shop on North Eutaw Street for an FBI informant and an undercover agent.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1999
A jury note that apparently was never read to the defendant in a 1997 Baltimore County trial could jeopardize the defendant's conviction for a murder that went unsolved for 19 years.William R. Isaacs, 46, of Baltimore was convicted of second-degree murder in the 1978 fatal beating of 22-year-old Mark Schwandtner, whose body was found in Big Gunpowder River beneath a railroad trestle near the Harford County line.On Tuesday, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals upheld Isaacs' October 1997 conviction.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 25, 2011
Within the last 10 days, the Maryland Court of Appeals overturned the first-degree murder convictions of two Mexican men in the gruesome murders of three children in Baltimore in 2004; the manslaughter conviction of Ricky Savoy in the death of Marvin Watts in Baltimore in 1993; and the second-degree murder conviction of Raymond Lupfer in the shooting death of Jeremy Yarbray in Cecil County in 2007. In each case, the state's highest court said, the trial judge made mistakes. One judge failed to tell attorneys about five "substantive" notes that came from the jury during trial.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | May 19, 1992
The woman serving 30 years for kidnapping a baby from his mother's room at Sinai Hospital in 1989 tried unsuccessfully yesterday to win an appeal of her conviction in Baltimore Circuit Court.Karleane Wilkinson, a native of Jamaica, was arrested Nov. 16, 1989, at her home near Woodmoor -- with the missing Avery Norris. The boy, then 2 days old, disappeared Sept. 21, 1989, after a woman dressed as a nurse told his mother she was taking him to a hospital nursery, city police said.A jury convicted Wilkinson of kidnapping a child younger than 16, and she received the maximum sentence from Judge Joseph I. Pines in April 1990.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | October 8, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The Court of Special Appeals overturned yesterday the conviction of a 31-year-old truck driver for the May 23, 1989, murder of a Catonsville man, citing errors by the trial judge.Maryland's intermediate appellate court ordered a new trial for Vincent O. Hamilton, formerly of Woodlawn, because Circuit Judge Cornelius F. Sybert Jr. erred three times during the trial.A three-judge panel said that Judge Sybert should have granted a postponement when Mr. Hamilton's lawyers learned only days before the trial was to start of evidence that should have been disclosed earlier.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
The oversized windows of Hans Wilhelmsen's house in Jacksonville command a view to the east of hills dotted with baled hay and stands of oak, maple and pine on the 70 acres he owns a mile south of where an Exxon station unleashed an underground flood of unleaded gasoline five years ago. Thirteen bison patrolled the fields then, but they're gone now, and Wilhelmsen is sure he knows why. "We saw six die at one time" about two years ago, Wilhelmsen said....
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
A Naval Academy midshipman accused of sexually assaulting a classmate at an off-campus party asked a judge Friday to decide his fate instead of a jury in the trial that's being watched at the Annapolis institution and across the country as a bellwether of how the military handles such cases. Midshipman Joshua Tate is charged with aggravated sexual assault and making false statements to investigators in a court-martial beginning Monday at the Washington Navy Yard. Tate was to face a jury made up of Navy and Marine Corps officers stationed in the Washington region but had a "change of heart," according to his civilian attorney, Jason Ehrenberg.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Three men convicted in a Baltimore murder are seeking a new trial after a prosecutor made an issue of a white witness' living in a predominantly black neighborhood - a comment that the judge in the case said "smacks of racism. " In closing arguments this month, Assistant State's Attorney Theresa M. Shaffer asked the jury to carefully consider the words of a witness who testified that the victim of a West Baltimore killing might have been armed. "He don't want to be involved," she said.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
An attorney for the one-time University of Virginia lacrosse player who was convicted last year of killing his ex-girlfriend, Yeardley Love of Cockeysville, argued Wednesday that he should get a new trial. Attorney Paul Clement told the Virginia Court of Appeals in Richmond that George Huguely V, now 26, effectively was denied the right to counsel during his trial because one of his lawyers became ill and could not appear in court to question witnesses. Despite the illness, the trial judge allowed the trial to proceed.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Baltimore County prosecutors will not be allowed to use information provided by James D. Laboard's lawyer on the night that the off-duty police officer allegedly killed a Randallstown teenager, a judge ruled Friday. During a criminal motions hearing, Circuit Judge Jan Marshall Alexander ruled that the lawyer's decision to talk to detectives violated attorney-client confidentiality. Prosecutors said the ruling would have little effect on the case. Laboard, a Baltimore County police officer, is charged with two counts of manslaughter in the death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
A federal judge ruled Monday that claims by two former Anne Arundel County employees, who allege they lost their jobs because of retaliation by the administration of former County Executive John R. Leopold, can advance to trial. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake threw out some parts of the lawsuits by Karla Hamner, a former spokeswoman for Leopold, and Joan Harris, who worked as a constituent services specialist during the executive's first term. But the judge "kept the crux of both of the cases" said John Singleton, an attorney representing both plaintiffs.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
A judge delivered a major blow Monday to the state's case against two men accused of fatally slashing the throats of three children nine years ago, ruling that the testimony of a key witness is inadmissible. As prosecutors try for a third time next month to convict Policarpio Espinoza Perez, 31, and Adan Canela, 26, they'll have to do so without some important evidence and witnesses they used to secure a 2006 guilty verdict that was later thrown out by Maryland's top court. Circuit Judge M. Brooke Murdock told the prosecution that it may not use the statements of the woman who said in the earlier trials that she drove the men from work to the crime scene.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2010
The Anne Arundel County judge who lost his post in the Nov. 2 election has alleged that the Republican challenger who beat him might have violated election laws. In a letter dated Friday and addressed to the state prosecutor, Maryland's attorney general and the Anne Arundel state's attorney, Circuit Judge Ronald H. Jarashow wrote that his allegations "warrant an investigation and possible prosecution of Alison L. Asti. " The allegations are based on a flier that he said "likely violates" the law. "I think that there are election violations that I am witness to, and I felt it was appropriate to bring it to the attention of these people," Jarashow said Friday.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | June 6, 2007
A Baltimore gang member who was improperly cajoled by a federal judge into pleading guilty in the middle of a drug conspiracy trial was resentenced yesterday to a prison term of about 21 years, far less than the 60-year sentence he originally received. A year ago, a federal appeals court threw out convictions that sent three Baltimore gang members to prison for decades, saying the trial judge had wrongly immersed himself into negotiations with the defendants and improperly encouraged them to enter guilty pleas.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has waived his right to a jury in his criminal misconduct trial, clearing the way for attorneys to make opening statements Friday in a case that now will be heard by a single judge. The surprise move came during the second day of jury selection in the trial of Leopold, who faces charges of fraud and misconduct for allegedly using his taxpayer-funded police detail to run personal and political errands. Neither Leopold nor his attorneys explained the reason for the change of course or its timing.
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