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By The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
Maryland's highest court on Thursday ruled in favor of an Orthodox Jewish plaintiff who missed part of a medical malpractice trial because it was scheduled during a two-day Jewish holiday. The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled that the trial court "abused its discretion by denying plaintiff's motions to suspend trial for two days," according to the opinion released this week. Attorney Thomas J. Macke argued the Montgomery County Circuit Court judges became more concerned with efficiency, trampling client Alexander Neustadter's religious freedom.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Pre-trial arguments are expected to be heard Tuesday in a high-profile murder and drug conspiracy case in which most defendants have flipped and attorneys couldn't review evidence with their clients until two days before trial due to safety concerns from prosecutors. Robert G. Moore, 45, is accused of being at the top of an East Baltimore drug syndicate that killed a man and shot five others to avenge the death of his relative, former prep wrestling standout Darian Kess. Prosecutors pointed to the indictment when it was filed 16 months ago as an example of taking on complex and challenging case.
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NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1997
The state's highest court yesterday affirmed the death sentence given last year to a Randallstown handyman in the 1994 killing of Debra Anne Goodwich, slain when she interrupted his burglary of her family's Baltimore County home.Wallace Dudley Ball, 36, was convicted of first-degree murder by a Charles County jury in May 1996 in the slaying of Goodwich, 19, on Sept. 30, 1994. Judge Joseph S. Casula sentenced Ball to death.In upholding Casula's sentencing, the Maryland Court of Appeals rejected eight defense arguments, including one that questioned whether the lower court erred when it refused to suppress Ball's confession to detectives.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar | March 4, 2013
Maryland's highest court plans to wait until its next term to hear the State Center lawsuit appeal, according to the court's website. The Court of Appeals' term starts on the second Monday of September. In mid-February the court said it would hear the appeal, allowing the case to skip the state's intermediate appellate court. Both sides are interested in having the case resolved as quickly as possible. Here's some background on the case from an earlier Real Estate Wonk post: In January, Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Althea M. Handy voided the development contracts that set up a framework for a mixed-use overhaul of a 28-acre site in midtown Baltimore that houses several state agencies.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 13, 2000
TALLAHASSEE - As the nation waited for word from the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday, the Florida Supreme Court handed George W. Bush a double victory, ruling that nearly 25,000 absentee ballots would not be tossed out, despite irregularities in the handling of the ballot applications. By a vote of 6-0 in both cases, Florida's highest court affirmed the decisions of two state circuit courts, which decided Friday that the ballots were valid even though Republican Party workers had altered information on the ballot applications.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1997
The state Court of Special Appeals has ruled that trustees of Baltimore County Community Colleges had authority to fire two tenured professors whose program was eliminated, and returned the case to a county court to decide whether the grievances should have been allowed at all.The judges ruled that tenure did not protect the Essex Community College professors from having the financially troubled school drop their office technology program and terminate their...
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar | March 4, 2013
Maryland's highest court plans to wait until its next term to hear the State Center lawsuit appeal, according to the court's website. The Court of Appeals' term starts on the second Monday of September. In mid-February the court said it would hear the appeal, allowing the case to skip the state's intermediate appellate court. Both sides are interested in having the case resolved as quickly as possible. Here's some background on the case from an earlier Real Estate Wonk post: In January, Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Althea M. Handy voided the development contracts that set up a framework for a mixed-use overhaul of a 28-acre site in midtown Baltimore that houses several state agencies.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1997
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals has ruled that an Edgewood youth was delinquent for his part in the 1995 death of a 15-year-old girl raped at a party and left outside to die of alcohol intoxication and exposure.A neighbor found the partly clothed body of Tiffany Artina Fouts in the woods on Nov. 12. The teen-ager, who because of his age is identified as Eric F. in court records, was sent to the state Department of Juvenile Justice by Harford County Circuit Court. He was 14 at the time of the incident.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 4, 2002
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City is not immune from lawsuits arising from lead paint poisoning even though its liability insurance no longer covers such claims, Maryland's intermediate appellate court ruled yesterday. The ruling came in four cases in which children who lived in or visited houses operated by the authority experienced elevated blood lead levels after being exposed to lead paint. The authority's lead paint liability coverage was terminated by its insurance carrier nearly five years ago. Without such insurance, the agency argued that it would not be able to satisfy any judgment issued against it and thus should be immune from being sued.
NEWS
April 9, 1991
Bill of Rights is far from 'a fraud'In an April 2 editorial titled "Still an outright fraud," The Evening Sun quoted a former solicitor general as stating that the Supreme Court has never invalidated a gun control statute on Second Amendment grounds. This is a half-truth.Review by the Supreme Court is not automatic. Most cases are heard only when the court decides it wants to hear them.The closest the Supreme Court ever came to a direct construction of the Second Amendment was in United States v. Miller, a 1939 decision.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2012
The cleanup is supposed to be done in 2014, nearly eight years after 26,000 gallons of gasoline contaminated the groundwater in a northern Baltimore County neighborhood, but there's no end in sight for the legal wrangling. On Thursday, the state Court of Special Appeals rejected much of a $147 million jury verdict awarded in 2009 to about 90 homeowners who sued Exxon Mobil Corp., which owned the Jacksonville filling station where the gasoline seeped into the ground. The ruling has frustrated residents and diminished their hopes that they will ever be compensated for the property damage and emotional anguish suffered from having chemicals from unleaded gas flowing into their wells.
NEWS
By Lynn McLain | September 28, 2011
When one of Charles Dickens' characters said, "The law is an ass," he could easily have been referring to the recent Maryland Court of Appeals decision that makes it practically impossible for the state to prosecute legislators for taking bribes - unless, perhaps, they are caught on video or with a wired informant. Instead of taking the opportunity to put teeth in the state bribery law, the Court of Appeals affirmed the dismissal of the indictment against Baltimore City Councilwoman Helen B. Holton on the grounds of "legislative privilege.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
Maryland's highest court ruled Thursday in favor of an Orthodox Jewish plaintiff who missed part of a medical malpractice trial because it was scheduled during a two-day Jewish holiday. He will now be a allowed a retrial in the case. The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled that the trial court "abused its discretion by denying plaintiff's motions to suspend trial for two days," according to the opinion issued this week. The top court's narrow ruling says that excluding Alexander Neustadter from his own trial was prejudicial.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | October 9, 2008
A Baltimore man's armed robbery convictions were overturned this week after the state's second-highest court said the judge tipped the trial in the prosecution's favor by asking too many questions of witnesses - more than 125 of them. "The trial judge, in our view, overly injected himself as an inquisitor through the testimony of the witnesses, the result of which was to unduly give the perception that he favored the State's version of the factual presentation," the Court of Special Appeals wrote Monday regarding Antwan Derrell Smith's convictions.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 10, 2005
WASHINGTON - A federal appeals court ruled yesterday that Jose Padilla, held for more than three years after federal officials said he planned to set off radiological devices or "dirty bombs," can be detained indefinitely without trial. The unanimous decision by a panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., significantly boosts the Bush administration's program of jailing key al-Qaida and Taliban suspects around the world without filing criminal charges or holding trials, whether the detainees are Americans arrested in the United States or foreigners seized abroad, in an effort to squeeze intelligence information from alleged militant operatives.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 17, 2003
Martin L. Grass, Rite Aid Corp.'s former chief executive, is expected to plead guilty today in federal court and avoid a lengthy trial on charges that he and key aides conspired to cheat the company and investors in a $1.6 billion fraud scheme. Grass faces 37 criminal charges, and the extent of his pleadings and whatever sentence he might receive are likely to be seen as important indications of how serious the government will be in its announced crackdown on white collar crime. Prosecutors would not specify yesterday the charges to which Grass is to plead guilty, noting that the plea agreement had not been filed.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1999
Top Baltimore judges are recommending that a key reform enacted 1 1/2 years ago to streamline justice be abandoned because it has instead resulted in more delays.The recommendation comes as the city Circuit Court wrestles with growing evidence that the justice system has been crippled by clogged dockets.Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan, Baltimore's administrative judge, said the effort to speed justice and sharpen prosecution did not work as it was meant to. Judges have less time for trials, and delays abound.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2002
Three nominees, including two from the public sector, have been added to a short list of candidates forwarded to Gov. Parris N. Glendening for the Howard District Court vacancy created by the June 28 death of Judge C. James "Kit" Sfekas. The three - a Howard assistant state's attorney, an assistant attorney general and a Columbia-based private practice lawyer - join a pool of four candidates who were interviewed by the governor for another judicial vacancy this year and are considered finalists for the current opening.
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