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Trial Balloon

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NEWS
January 6, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer raised an interesting trial balloon by proposing that city and state officials get together with the business community to revive the area around the Inner Harbor's vacant Power Plant, failed Fish Market and bankrupt Brokerage complexes.This is an idea worth pursuing. Like the Linowes commission proposals, it could lead to a relaxation of tensions between the governor and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and send a powerful message to the business community to get involved.
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NEWS
January 14, 2012
Hours before the 2012 General Assembly session started, Gov. Martin O'Malley dusted off the frustrating passivity he employed to such ill effect in 2011. Speaking to Marc Steiner in the radio host's annual pre-session show, Mr. O'Malley casually mentioned that if he had his "druthers," Maryland would avoid a lot of the cuts that will be necessitated by its current budget woes and would instead raise the sales tax by another penny. Not that he's actually proposing such a thing, he and aides hastily clarified later.
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NEWS
March 1, 1993
President Clinton's latest trial balloon -- increased federal cigarette taxes to pay for health care reforms -- looks like it will stay aloft but in no way can it begin to finance the costs of extending universal access to all citizens and extending coverage to include long-term nursing care.According to a study just released by the Congressional Budget Office, a doubling of the current 24-cents-a-pack federal tax to 48 cents would raise just $17.9 billion over the next five fiscal years.
NEWS
January 13, 2012
Taken right out of the Bill Clinton handbook, Gov. Martin O'Malley floats a trial balloon and suggests a hike in the state's gas tax only to alter the plan and now suggest an increase in the sales tax from 6 percent to 7 percent. Is this man on the same planet as we the taxpayers? Doesn't he know how much the people who pay taxes are hurting? Raising these taxes goes to the gut of people who are still fortunate to be employed. Perhaps the "New Americans" the governor is so fond of can afford the tax hike and pay for the new roads and bridges only they will be using.
SPORTS
By Kenneth Reich and Bill Plaschke and Kenneth Reich and Bill Plaschke,Los Angeles Times | October 3, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- The NFL floated an apparent trial balloon yesterday, saying it might enter into a partnership to build a football stadium in Los Angeles to keep a pro franchise here and serve as site of the Super Bowl on a rotating basis. But Los Angeles officials quickly dismissed the idea as unrealistic.Paul Tagliabue, the league commissioner, talked of the possible stadium in a halftime interview on the Fox television network, which has a contract that requires the NFL to keep a team in the Los Angeles area or receive less in payments from Fox.With the Rams and Raiders telling an NFL owners meeting in Dallas last week that neither now has a contractual agreement to keep playing in the Los Angeles area, Tagliabue said the purpose of a new stadium built in partnership with the city or the state of California would be to "keep [the]
NEWS
January 13, 2012
Taken right out of the Bill Clinton handbook, Gov. Martin O'Malley floats a trial balloon and suggests a hike in the state's gas tax only to alter the plan and now suggest an increase in the sales tax from 6 percent to 7 percent. Is this man on the same planet as we the taxpayers? Doesn't he know how much the people who pay taxes are hurting? Raising these taxes goes to the gut of people who are still fortunate to be employed. Perhaps the "New Americans" the governor is so fond of can afford the tax hike and pay for the new roads and bridges only they will be using.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 23, 2011
In his first season as an NFL defensive coordinator, Chuck Pagano has the Ravens tied for third in the league in average points allowed (16.9) and ranked in the top five in categories such as total yards (third, 287.9 yards), rushing yards (second, 90.0), passing yards (fifth, 197.9) and third-down efficiency (first, 30.4 percent). Which is why suggestions that Pagano could be a candidate for a head-coaching vacancy have already begun to circulate in media circles. But Pagano deflated that trial balloon during his weekly briefing Wednesday.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | March 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- White House officials are actively floating the name of New York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo as a potential nominee for the Supreme Court in an apparent attempt to get the reaction of official Washington and special-interest groups.The effort does not signal that Mr. Cuomo definitely will be the nominee, or that he is necessarily at the top of any official list, or even that the list of possible nominees is final, a White House official conceded."I don't have the sense that they are hot and heavy in the pursuit right now," one outside adviser said of the search for a new justice.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | October 17, 1990
Washington. ACCORDING TO the Western leak machine, the scenario is set for a devastating war in the Middle East.On a moonless November night, when the deserts of Kuwait and Saudi Arabia are seas of blackness, and hardly a magic lantern is lit in the fabled city of Baghdad, a terrible but hopefully short conflict begins.From 60 ships in the Persian Gulf area, and from bases in Saudi Arabia, Turkey and even Egypt and Western Europe, 1,000 tank-killing Apache helicopters and hundreds of A-10 ground attack jets deliver their fury on the 400,000-man Iraqi armored units now positioned in Kuwait.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau | February 18, 1992
MEXICO CITY -- Officials close to President Carlos Salinas de Gortari are trying to find a way to kill Mexico's most sacred political cow -- the constitutional provision that limits presidents to a single six-year term.The officials are working on a change in the constitution that would allow the 43-year-old president to run for re-election and serve as long as 14 years.Their view is that a single six-year term is not enough time for Mr. Salinas to complete his ambitious goals, especially the rejuvenation of an economy that seeks salvation in a free-trade agreement with the United States and Canada.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 23, 2011
In his first season as an NFL defensive coordinator, Chuck Pagano has the Ravens tied for third in the league in average points allowed (16.9) and ranked in the top five in categories such as total yards (third, 287.9 yards), rushing yards (second, 90.0), passing yards (fifth, 197.9) and third-down efficiency (first, 30.4 percent). Which is why suggestions that Pagano could be a candidate for a head-coaching vacancy have already begun to circulate in media circles. But Pagano deflated that trial balloon during his weekly briefing Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2005
Legg Mason Inc., reported to be in talks with Citigroup Inc. to shed its brokerage business and expand its investment management portfolio, might not be in a hurry to do a deal, according to industry watchers. News leaked last week that the two companies were negotiating a potential swap in which Legg Mason's 1,540 brokers would switch to Citigroup. In return, Legg Mason would get up to $460 billion in assets that Citigroup invests on behalf of clients. Such a deal would catapult the Baltimore company from a medium-sized money manager to one of the biggest in the nation.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
THE KIND offer of Warren Beatty to consider serving his nation as president should not go unappreciated.Confiding to a reporter that he might run for the Democratic nomination to compensate for others' inadequacies, Mr. Beatty comes from the proud tradition of Hollywood film stars who sacrifice career for public service. Sen. Fred Thompson of Tennessee comes to mind, as well as Representatives Sonny Bono and Helen Gahagan Douglas and Sen. George Murphy -- all of California -- and, of course, President Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
By Alec Klein and Alec Klein,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Paula Lavigne contributed to this report | June 11, 1998
In yesterday's story about the Johns Hopkins University's proposal to turn Memorial Stadium into an office complex, the number of Orioles World Series titles was misstated. The team has played in six World Series and won three of them. The Sun regrets the error. In a dramatic play rare in urban redevelopment, Johns Hopkins University is proposing to save Memorial Stadium from the wrecking ball by converting the storied ballpark into an office complex -- a plan that would preserve a piece of Baltimore lore.
SPORTS
By Kenneth Reich and Bill Plaschke and Kenneth Reich and Bill Plaschke,Los Angeles Times | October 3, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- The NFL floated an apparent trial balloon yesterday, saying it might enter into a partnership to build a football stadium in Los Angeles to keep a pro franchise here and serve as site of the Super Bowl on a rotating basis. But Los Angeles officials quickly dismissed the idea as unrealistic.Paul Tagliabue, the league commissioner, talked of the possible stadium in a halftime interview on the Fox television network, which has a contract that requires the NFL to keep a team in the Los Angeles area or receive less in payments from Fox.With the Rams and Raiders telling an NFL owners meeting in Dallas last week that neither now has a contractual agreement to keep playing in the Los Angeles area, Tagliabue said the purpose of a new stadium built in partnership with the city or the state of California would be to "keep [the]
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Nation's Capital is a town of ever-floating trial balloons -- ideas hoisted aloft by politicians to see which way the wind is blowing, and whether it will sustain a controversial notion or move.The latest one -- Washington Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly's scheme to combat the city's rampant violent crime with the use of the District of Columbia National Guard -- has been deflated though not altogether shot down by President Clinton. After the hits he has taken on the use of American troops in Somalia and Haiti, he plainly doesn't want the responsibility of personal involvement in the local mayhem.
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON and NELSON SCHWARTZ | June 27, 1993
Washington. -- Maybe this is what President Clinton meant by "re-inventing government": Call it government by "trial balloon."On almost every major issue facing the administration -- issues ranging from U.S. military strategy to key personnel appointments to a vast overhaul of health care -- the Clinton administration routinely floats an idea or a name or an approach so that it can gauge public opinion before it acts.Going back to Franklin D. Roosevelt, presidents have used leaks to "run things up the flag pole and see if anyone salutes," in the words of William Leuchtenberg, a professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the author of several books on the presidency.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The White House has been following a time-honored political strategy in trying to prepare the Congress and the voters for President Clinton's official unveiling of his program for reforming the health care system.For almost two weeks now there have been daily leaks of particulars of the plan to the press. At the same time, the White House has broadened the circle of those being briefed, thus assuring even wider discussion of the particulars among reporters, politicians and lobbyists.
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON and NELSON SCHWARTZ | June 27, 1993
Washington. -- Maybe this is what President Clinton meant by "re-inventing government": Call it government by "trial balloon."On almost every major issue facing the administration -- issues ranging from U.S. military strategy to key personnel appointments to a vast overhaul of health care -- the Clinton administration routinely floats an idea or a name or an approach so that it can gauge public opinion before it acts.Going back to Franklin D. Roosevelt, presidents have used leaks to "run things up the flag pole and see if anyone salutes," in the words of William Leuchtenberg, a professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the author of several books on the presidency.
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