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By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | February 6, 1991
After two years of trying to raise capital for a new company aimed at marketing reseachers' ideas, The Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Health System have gotten three corporations to invest $2.25 million.Constellation Holdings Inc. of Baltimore, 3iVentures Corp. of Boston and Whiting-Turner Corp., a local construction company, have invested in Triad Investors Corp. Hopkins would not disclose how much each company invested.Triad was formed in 1988 to identify research at Hopkins that can be marketed and to find seed money for the projects.
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By Dru Sefton and Dru Sefton,NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 2004
The term "anti-adoption" sounds ludicrous. Who could oppose placing an unwanted child into a loving home? An entire movement, it turns out - fighting with a primal passion to expose what activists insist is adoption's darker side: the lifelong trauma of women coerced into surrendering babies. Adoptees denied their heritage. And, they say, a billion-dollar industry that focuses more on money than youngsters' welfare. Some leave careers to write letters, track legislation, research articles and books.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When Floyd Coates, an Indiana businessman and one-time candidate for Congress, decided to make some big campaign donations in the last election, he wanted be sure that the $100,000 or so he planned to give would end up supporting his brand of conservative, free-market, pro-military, anti-abortion candidates."
NEWS
May 13, 2004
On Sunday, May 8, 2004, MICHAEL R. OKEEFE, beloved son of Helma Okeefe; brother of Vincent and Tony Okeefe, Kathleen Dombrowski, Roger and Kerry Wisnosky, and Jackie Brunlinski. Also survived by nieces and nephews, Amie and Kristin Spurlock, and Wyatt and Sydney Wisnosky. Memorial services private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Triad Health Project, c/o Higher Ground, 210 E. Bessemer Ave., Greensboro, NC 27435.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | February 6, 1991
Triad Investors Corp., the venture-capital company started by a branch of the Johns Hopkins University, announced yesterday that it had secured $5.25 million from investors to develop commercially viable technology -- primarily from the university -- and get it into the marketplace.The investors include a British-based venture-capital group; the university and Johns Hopkins Health System; and two private Baltimore companies, Constellation Holdings Inc., a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. subsidiary, and Whiting-Turner Contracting Co.None of the parties would say exactly how much money each invested in Triad, but the Hopkins institutions together will own a majority of the stock.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1991
Two small Baltimore-based venture capital funds have merged, resulting in an organization with more economic power to help transfer university research from the laboratory to the marketplace.Triad Investors Corp. and Zero Stage Capital will now operate as one fund with a combined pool of $10.25 million.Barbara Plantholt, a general partner of Zero Stage, has joined Triad as its president and chief executive officer.After two years of trying to raise capital for a new company aimed at marketing researchers' ideas, Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Health System announced earlier this year it had gotten three corporations to invest $2.25 million in Triad.
NEWS
May 13, 2004
On Sunday, May 8, 2004, MICHAEL R. OKEEFE, beloved son of Helma Okeefe; brother of Vincent and Tony Okeefe, Kathleen Dombrowski, Roger and Kerry Wisnosky, and Jackie Brunlinski. Also survived by nieces and nephews, Amie and Kristin Spurlock, and Wyatt and Sydney Wisnosky. Memorial services private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Triad Health Project, c/o Higher Ground, 210 E. Bessemer Ave., Greensboro, NC 27435.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | September 25, 1991
Barbara Plantholt, president of Zero Stage Capital Maryland Limited Partnership, readily admits her venture capital fund was unable to raise the amount of money she'd hoped. But she's not alone.Triad Investors Corp., funded partly through various Johns Hopkins institutions, also came up about 50 percent short of its fund-raising goals.So the two announced yesterday that they have merged, with Triad becoming the general partner of Zero Stage, and Ms. Plantholt president of both. Leigh R. Abts, president of Triad since it started to seek out investors several years ago, is now executive vice president and chief operating officer of Triad.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | March 31, 1999
1997 Napa Ridge Triad ($8).This medium-bodied, fresh blend of chardonnay (60 percent), sauvignon blanc (21 percent) and semillon (19 percent) delivers excellent value along with flavors of melon, herbs, pear and apples. Its flavors are more dramatic than subtle, but what's wrong with that in an easy-sipping dry white wine? Buy by the case and enjoy it through Labor Day.Pub Date: 03/31/99
NEWS
February 10, 1991
For two years technology leaders at Johns Hopkins University, the nation's No. 1 winner of federal research funds, have sought to build a venture-capital program. For while university research continues to attract support, commercialization of its discoveries seems to happen somewhere else.Now, the university and its associated health-care system have found partners to help change that and help build the kind of high-tech infrastructure that can be seen around Pittsburgh's Carnegie-Mellon University or in California's Silicon Valley.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | March 31, 1999
1997 Napa Ridge Triad ($8).This medium-bodied, fresh blend of chardonnay (60 percent), sauvignon blanc (21 percent) and semillon (19 percent) delivers excellent value along with flavors of melon, herbs, pear and apples. Its flavors are more dramatic than subtle, but what's wrong with that in an easy-sipping dry white wine? Buy by the case and enjoy it through Labor Day.Pub Date: 03/31/99
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When Floyd Coates, an Indiana businessman and one-time candidate for Congress, decided to make some big campaign donations in the last election, he wanted be sure that the $100,000 or so he planned to give would end up supporting his brand of conservative, free-market, pro-military, anti-abortion candidates."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 16, 1996
Despite the gaudy title, Zhang Yimou's "Shanghai Triad," which opens today at the Charles, is a muted, even contemplative movie that is less about the gangster trade in the most dangerous city of the '30s than it is about the small epiphanies of humanity that occasionally come in the most unlikely of circumstances to the most unlikely of people.Imagine "The Godfather" through the eyes of a 13-year-old boy just in from the hinterlands of rural Jersey and his dad's pepper farm, and you have an idea of the originality, and the oddity, of the film.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1995
Southwest Baltimore will likely be the first city neighborhood to form a new crime-fighting partnership between senior citizens and law enforcement officials, Chief Deputy Sheriff David De Angelis told a meeting of about 50 seniors yesterday.Such partnerships, called "triads," have been used across the country and in 18 Maryland counties to educate seniors in crime prevention and develop them as resources for police officers, Deputy De Angelis said.In each community with a triad, senior citizens, law enforcement officials and representatives of the American Association of Retired Persons form a council to discuss seniors' concerns about security.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1994
Maryland's law enforcement officials appear ready to embrace a program that seeks to forge close ties between police and elderly people.The program, called Triad, is gaining popularity nationwide by bringing police together with elderly people, who often feel detached from those who fight crime, supporters of the 6-year-old concept say.The idea was developed by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), the International Association of Chiefs of Police and the National Sheriffs' Association in 1988.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | August 13, 1993
The Hopkins Bayview Research Campus is getting a boost from a New Jersey-based pharmaceutical company that will lease 17,313 square feet of laboratory space in the Triad Technology Center.Barre-National, a Maryland-based subsidiary of A. L. Laboratories Inc., is taking over space vacated late last year by Scios Nova Inc., another pharmaceutical firm, which consolidated its local operations at the city-owned Holabird Industrial Park.Barre-National develops both generic and proprietary pharmaceutical products -- including liquid, topical, suppository and inhaled products -- including several drugs with dermatological uses.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1994
Maryland's law enforcement officials appear ready to embrace a program that seeks to forge close ties between police and elderly people.The program, called Triad, is gaining popularity nationwide by bringing police together with elderly people, who often feel detached from those who fight crime, supporters of the 6-year-old concept say.The idea was developed by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), the International Association of Chiefs of Police and the National Sheriffs' Association in 1988.
TOPIC
By Dru Sefton and Dru Sefton,NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 2004
The term "anti-adoption" sounds ludicrous. Who could oppose placing an unwanted child into a loving home? An entire movement, it turns out - fighting with a primal passion to expose what activists insist is adoption's darker side: the lifelong trauma of women coerced into surrendering babies. Adoptees denied their heritage. And, they say, a billion-dollar industry that focuses more on money than youngsters' welfare. Some leave careers to write letters, track legislation, research articles and books.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | September 25, 1991
Barbara Plantholt, president of Zero Stage Capital Maryland Limited Partnership, readily admits her venture capital fund was unable to raise the amount of money she'd hoped. But she's not alone.Triad Investors Corp., funded partly through various Johns Hopkins institutions, also came up about 50 percent short of its fund-raising goals.So the two announced yesterday that they have merged, with Triad becoming the general partner of Zero Stage, and Ms. Plantholt president of both. Leigh R. Abts, president of Triad since it started to seek out investors several years ago, is now executive vice president and chief operating officer of Triad.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1991
Two small Baltimore-based venture capital funds have merged, resulting in an organization with more economic power to help transfer university research from the laboratory to the marketplace.Triad Investors Corp. and Zero Stage Capital will now operate as one fund with a combined pool of $10.25 million.Barbara Plantholt, a general partner of Zero Stage, has joined Triad as its president and chief executive officer.After two years of trying to raise capital for a new company aimed at marketing researchers' ideas, Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Health System announced earlier this year it had gotten three corporations to invest $2.25 million in Triad.
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