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NEWS
May 17, 1996
IF SEN. TRENT LOTT of Mississippi, the early-line favorite, succeeds Sen. Bob Dole as majority leader of the Republican-controlled Senate, "confrontational conservatism" will reign supreme on Capitol Hill. Mr. Lott is an old buddy and soul mate of House Speaker Newt Gingrich and, even more, of House majority leader Dick Armey. He is neither in his relationship with his party's presidential nominee, long an advocate of "commonsense conservatism." There's a big difference.Mr. Dole opposed his likely successor when Mr. Lott won the party whip's job two years ago. And the Mississippian returned the favor by backing Sen. Phil Gramm in his losing primary battles with Mr. Dole earlier this year.
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NEWS
November 28, 2007
Believe it or not, Congress actually needs more people like Sen. Trent Lott, who announced his retirement Monday. The glib Mississippi Republican is a seersucker-loving Southerner whose conservative political views couldn't get him elected in Philadelphia to a seat on Traffic Court. But he brought a quality to Congress that more lawmakers need: He got things done. Few elected officials in the last 35 years have shown more flexibility than Mr. Lott to work with the opposing party. - The Philadelphia Inquirer
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NEWS
June 27, 1996
BOB DOLE's last service to the Senate he loved may have been to leave it. This is not said in criticism of the Republican presidential contender, who had hoped to compile a good legislative record to bolster his campaign. It is, instead, a recognition that guerrilla tactics by Democratic senators succeeded not only in thwarting Mr. Dole but in advancing their political issue of choice -- a raise in the minimum wage.Since Mr. Dole's departure, his successor as majority leader, Sen. Trent Lott of Mississippi, has sought to break an election-year gridlock in order to establish his own bona fides.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Johanna Neuman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 27, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Trent Lott of Mississippi, the No. 2 Republican leader in the Senate, announced yesterday that he will resign before the end of the year. With his wife, Tricia, at his side during a news conference in Pascagoula, Miss., Lott said that after 35 years in the House and the Senate, "It's time for us to do something else." The departure by year's end means that Lott, whose home was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina, could accept a position lobbying his former colleagues one year after he leaves office under the current law, instead of waiting for two years, as is required under the new Senate ethics law that goes into effect in January.
NEWS
January 13, 1997
WITH NEWT GINGRICH precariously perched in the House speaker's chair, and his future by no means secure, the most powerful figure on Capitol Hill this year is Senate majority leader Trent Lott. The Mississippi Republican, suave but tough, has made it clear House Republicans will no longer be setting the legislative agenda as they did in 1995 and 1996. Much of the initiative is going to shift to the Senate.Senator Lott will begin by pushing that old chestnut, a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution.
NEWS
By Richard L. Tafel | June 21, 1998
Last week was not a good week for the leadership of the Republican Party. With all of the major legislative issues confronting Congress, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott and his colleagues were comparing gays and lesbians to kleptomaniacs, drug addicts and alcoholics, inflaming a growing conflict within the GOP on its shaky status as the party of the "big tent."I'm an ordained American Baptist minister who also was born gay.Lott claimed to speak for all Christians when he claimed that homosexuality is a sin and an illness that should be treated.
NEWS
By Martin D. Tullai and Martin D. Tullai,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 2002
Columnist William Safire has written that a blooper is an "exploitable mistake," which is worse than a goof, equivalent to a gaffe, but not as serious as a blunder. By this standard, Sen. Trent Lott's unwise and inappropriate statement at Sen. Strom Thurmond's 100th birthday party was an egregious blunder. This was the widely publicized comment by Lott that the country would have been better off if Thurmond had been elected president in 1948 when he ran on the Dixiecrat ticket. Thurmond's platform was continued racial segregation.
FEATURES
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 23, 1997
PASCAGOULA, Miss. The night sky was lit by flames from burning cars, the smoky air stinging with tear gas. Bottles, bricks and rocks were hurtling toward the federal marshals surrounding the campus administration building.On that evening of Sept. 30, 1962, thousands of students at the University of Mississippi - joined by others from throughout the state - were waging a savage protest against the court-ordered admission of James Meredith, a 29-year-old black man. By the end of the 15-hour riot, a journalist and a jukebox repairman from a nearby town would be shot dead, dozens injured and 150 people arrested.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- If there was one Republican senator who took the news of Bob Dole's departure a bit more dry-eyed than the rest, it was the majority leader's chief deputy, Trent Lott.The tall, handsome Mississippian, who blends courtly manners with a hard-edged political style, has quickly become the man to beat in a contest for Dole's leadership post that may well determine the tone and work habits of the Senate for years to come. Cooperate with a Democratic president? Make life hard for him?
NEWS
By THE NEW YORK TIMES | June 9, 2007
Are we men and women or mice? Are we going to slither away from this issue and hope for some epiphany to happen? No. Let's legislate." - SEN. TRENT LOTT of Mississippi, minority whip, urging his colleagues Thursday to vote for an overhaul of the nation's immigration laws in spite of popular opposition to the legislation
NEWS
By THE NEW YORK TIMES | June 9, 2007
Are we men and women or mice? Are we going to slither away from this issue and hope for some epiphany to happen? No. Let's legislate." - SEN. TRENT LOTT of Mississippi, minority whip, urging his colleagues Thursday to vote for an overhaul of the nation's immigration laws in spite of popular opposition to the legislation
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The tables were loaded with untouched platters of food as Sen. Elizabeth Dole rose last week to introduce her party's Senate candidate from Nebraska. Sixty people were supposed to be at the fundraiser, but Dole, the host and leader of the Republican effort to hold the Senate this fall, found just 18 people scattered across a vast expanse of empty carpet. Dole has been a nearly unstoppable star for 25 years: a Cabinet secretary, the head of the Red Cross and a popular senator from North Carolina, never mind the wife of Bob Dole, the former Senate majority leader and Republican presidential nominee.
NEWS
By JILL ZUCKMAN and JILL ZUCKMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As the Senate struggled recently to resolve an impasse over immigration reform, Sen. John Cornyn needed advice from an expert. He did not turn to President Bush nor to Majority Leader Bill Frist. "I said, `Trent, how do we get out of this mess?'" said Cornyn, a Texas Republican, referring to Sen. Trent Lott, the former Senate Republican leader from Mississippi whose knack for legislative strategy remains undiminished, if newly appreciated. Lott was forced from his leadership post in 2002 after he praised then-Sen.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 2005
WASHINGTON - After Sen. Trent Lott was deposed as the Republican leader in December 2002 because of a racially charged remark, he slipped into the background, quietly rebuilding his power and career. But Lott is quiet no more, with a new memoir and an accompanying national book tour in which he is providing a behind-the-scenes view of his more than 30 years representing Mississippi in Congress and his admittedly inept handling of a furor that began with words of praise for Sen. Strom Thurmond at his 100th birthday party.
NEWS
April 22, 2005
THE NATION'S highways are as dangerous as ever. An estimated 42,800 people died on the road last year, up slightly from the 42,643 in 2003, according to a preliminary accounting released yesterday. The numbers suggest some troubling trends: SUV rollover fatalities rose 6.9 percent, and large truck crashes and motorcycle accidents are killing more people, too. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta yesterday reacted to the news by urging motorists to wear seatbelts. While helpful (a majority of the people killed in crashes aren't wearing them)
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | August 5, 2004
THE ALMOST certain election of black Illinois legislator Barack Obama to the Senate in November has ignited almost as much excitement as his acclaimed Democratic convention keynote speech. He would be only the fifth black person ever to sit in the Senate. If Georgia Rep. Denise L. Majette wins the Aug. 10 Democratic primary run-off for the Senate nomination, she also has an outside chance of winning a Senate seat. If she doesn't, Mr. Obama may well be the lone black senator for years to come.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | February 27, 1998
The allegation is that the Big Creep carried on with a young woman. No prosecutor, Republican, conservative, talk show host or member of Congress would ever do that.American teen-agers rank below Europeans in math and science but have more fun.Now that the Iraq crisis is defused, Trent Lott & Co. are talking how tough they are.Henny Youngman finally ran out of one-liners.Pub Date: 2/27/98
NEWS
November 28, 2007
Believe it or not, Congress actually needs more people like Sen. Trent Lott, who announced his retirement Monday. The glib Mississippi Republican is a seersucker-loving Southerner whose conservative political views couldn't get him elected in Philadelphia to a seat on Traffic Court. But he brought a quality to Congress that more lawmakers need: He got things done. Few elected officials in the last 35 years have shown more flexibility than Mr. Lott to work with the opposing party. - The Philadelphia Inquirer
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2003
THE MEDIA gaggle that descended on Morgan State University last week for a Democratic presidential debate picked a favorite early in the night. It wasn't former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean or Connecticut Sen. Joe Lieberman. It was heartthrob actor George Clooney. Clooney was the most popular attraction inside the Carl Murphy Fine Arts Center, with scores of eyes following him wherever he went. Armed with a handheld camera, Clooney was shooting footage for his HBO series K Street, a new show filmed and edited on the fly that seeks to blend breaking news with the lives of real and fictional political consultants and lobbyists.
NEWS
By Nick Anderson and Nick Anderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - Critics are hearing echoes of the Trent Lott furor this week in Sen. Rick Santorum's comments that linked gay consensual sex with bigamy, polygamy, incest and adultery. To which some prominent Republicans who have read Santorum's words reply, in essence: What controversy? Lott, a Mississippi Republican, was forced to step down as Senate Republican leader in December after he praised the 1948 presidential candidacy of Strom Thurmond, whose campaign advocated racial segregation.
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