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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 8, 2012
He played a hardnosed detective on HBO's The Wire, a trombonist on Treme and soon Wendell Pierce will be a grocery store owner. The actor who has a made a career starring in David Simon's popular television series plans to open Sterling Farms grocery stores in low-income neighborhoods in New Orleans, where there a shortage of good supermarkets. He talked about the plans recently with The New York Times. He and a business partner have already opened Sterling Express in the city where Treme is taped.
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NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Anwan Glover, who appeared in three seasons of "The Wire," was stabbed inside a Washington D.C. nightclub early Sunday, police said. About 2 a.m. Sunday, a man approached Glover inside the Cafe Asia nightclub in the 1700 block of I Street in Northwest Washington and struck him several times, according to the police report. As the assault escalated, Glover fell to the floor and was stabbed once in the torso, the report said. He was treated at George Washington University Hospital and later released.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2011
Last season in previewing HBO's "Treme," I said that in 30 years of writing about television, I had never heard music used as organically, wisely and powerfully as it was in the New Orleans-based series created by David Simon and Eric Overmyer. I also said I never expected to hear it done better on TV. I was wrong. Sunday night's opening of Season 2 takes it to another level. And the use of music just keeps getting stronger and stronger through each of the episodes made available by HBO. In the Season 2 opener, titled "Accentuate the Positive," there is one knockout musical production after another.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
There was a strong Baltimore flavor to the nominations for the 2014 Emmys announced today. Baltimore-made "House of Cards," the first non-TV series to win a major Emmy last year, scored in three of the highest categories with nominations for best drama, best actor in a drama (Kevin Spacey) and best actress (Robin Wright). Creator and showrunner Beau Willlimon was nominated for best writing in a drama series, while Carl Franklin is a nominee for his direction. Kate Mara and Reg E. Cathey also earned nominations as best guest actor and actress.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2013
In two decades of covering David Simon's television career, one thing I can say with absolute certainty is that he was never boring or predictable. And he came through again last week in an interview that I had imagined as a simple Q&A advancing the five-episode series finale of “Treme,” which starts at 9 Sunday night on HBO. In my last question, I asked what was next for him. And I was surprised to hear the creator of “The Wire,” which many analysts rightfully consider the greatest series in the history of prime-time television, say he might be leaving the medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
The show about New Orleans musicians and the Baltimore crime drama are vastly different, but their shared DNA does shine through. One of the great joys of the HBO's drama "Treme" is watching the way that Wendell Pierce, known to fans of "The Wire" as Detective William "Bunk" Moreland, makes you come to care about his new character, Antoine Batiste, a struggling trombone player trying to make it in post-Katrina New Orleans. Batiste is our point of entry and a guide into the culture of that city.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 31, 2010
David Mills, a two-time Emmy winner and writer on the Baltimore-set TV series "Homicide: Life On the Street" and "The Wire," died yesterday in New Orleans, the New Orleans Time-Picayune is reporting. Mills, a former newspaper feature writer, was in New Orleans as a writer and co-executive producer of "Treme," a new HBO series set to debut next month. All three series have highlighted the work of Maryland native David Simon, a former Baltimore Sun reporter. Mills' collapsed on the set of "Treme" Tuesday afternoon, according to a report on investigativevoice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun TV critic | March 28, 2010
I n 30 years of writing about television, I have never heard music used as organically, wisely and powerfully as it is in the new HBO drama, "Treme," from Baltimore writer David Simon and playwright Eric Overmyer. The 80-minute pilot episode opens on a street parade and closes on a funeral procession. The former, with its screaming brass, syncopated bass drum and snake-hipped dancers, lifted me out of my seat and instantly transported me into the bombed-out landscape of post-Katrina New Orleans, where the series is set. The latter, with its dirgelike, slower-than-the-slowest-rhythm-you-can-imagine version of "A Closer Walk with Thee," touched me in a psychic place that has nothing to do with rational thought, criticism or even words.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
David Simon, creator of the HBO series "Treme," will join a Sunday afternoon reception at Johnny's (4800 Roland Avenue, johnnysdownstairs.com) in Roland Park for cookbook author Lolis Eric Elie. Elie, a staff writer and story editor on the series, will sign copies of his book, "Treme: Stories and Recipes from the Heart of New Orleans" at the event, which is scheduled from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The event costs $50, which includes a signed copy of the cookbook, snacks and a special Treme cocktail.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2012
David Simon whose HBO show "Treme" is shot in New Orleans, is venting to the media site Poynter.org about plans to cut back the city's newspaper, the Times-Picayune. News broke this week that the paper's owners plan to publish the Times-Picayune just three days a week starting this fall. There will also be staff cuts. "It's grievous news as it would be for any American city," Simons told Poynter in an email, adding, "But New Orleans isn't immune. No one is. And this slow suicide - as the great Molly Ivins called it - will continue unabated until the industry swallows hard and takes its product - every last newspaper - behind a paywall.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
David Simon, creator of the HBO series "Treme," will join a Sunday afternoon reception at Johnny's (4800 Roland Avenue, johnnysdownstairs.com) in Roland Park for cookbook author Lolis Eric Elie. Elie, a staff writer and story editor on the series, will sign copies of his book, "Treme: Stories and Recipes from the Heart of New Orleans" at the event, which is scheduled from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The event costs $50, which includes a signed copy of the cookbook, snacks and a special Treme cocktail.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2013
In two decades of covering David Simon's television career, one thing I can say with absolute certainty is that he was never boring or predictable. And he came through again last week in an interview that I had imagined as a simple Q&A advancing the five-episode series finale of “Treme,” which starts at 9 Sunday night on HBO. In my last question, I asked what was next for him. And I was surprised to hear the creator of “The Wire,” which many analysts rightfully consider the greatest series in the history of prime-time television, say he might be leaving the medium.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2012
David Simon whose HBO show "Treme" is shot in New Orleans, is venting to the media site Poynter.org about plans to cut back the city's newspaper, the Times-Picayune. News broke this week that the paper's owners plan to publish the Times-Picayune just three days a week starting this fall. There will also be staff cuts. "It's grievous news as it would be for any American city," Simons told Poynter in an email, adding, "But New Orleans isn't immune. No one is. And this slow suicide - as the great Molly Ivins called it - will continue unabated until the industry swallows hard and takes its product - every last newspaper - behind a paywall.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | March 12, 2012
David Simon has returned to the pages of his old newspaper with a compelling look back at a Baltimore police officer wounded in the drug war, and now in need of help himself. The blind Gene Cassidy, shot twice in the head in 1987, still works at the police training academy. Simon, a former police reporter, has turned the cop beat into a celebrated artform, with his book, " Homicide: Life on the Street ," an all-too real glimpse into the city's "Murder Police," and then with the fictionalize HBO series," The Wire ,"which mirrored real life in some uncomfortable ways.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 8, 2012
He played a hardnosed detective on HBO's The Wire, a trombonist on Treme and soon Wendell Pierce will be a grocery store owner. The actor who has a made a career starring in David Simon's popular television series plans to open Sterling Farms grocery stores in low-income neighborhoods in New Orleans, where there a shortage of good supermarkets. He talked about the plans recently with The New York Times. He and a business partner have already opened Sterling Express in the city where Treme is taped.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2011
Last season in previewing HBO's "Treme," I said that in 30 years of writing about television, I had never heard music used as organically, wisely and powerfully as it was in the New Orleans-based series created by David Simon and Eric Overmyer. I also said I never expected to hear it done better on TV. I was wrong. Sunday night's opening of Season 2 takes it to another level. And the use of music just keeps getting stronger and stronger through each of the episodes made available by HBO. In the Season 2 opener, titled "Accentuate the Positive," there is one knockout musical production after another.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Anwan Glover, who appeared in three seasons of "The Wire," was stabbed inside a Washington D.C. nightclub early Sunday, police said. About 2 a.m. Sunday, a man approached Glover inside the Cafe Asia nightclub in the 1700 block of I Street in Northwest Washington and struck him several times, according to the police report. As the assault escalated, Glover fell to the floor and was stabbed once in the torso, the report said. He was treated at George Washington University Hospital and later released.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | March 12, 2012
David Simon has returned to the pages of his old newspaper with a compelling look back at a Baltimore police officer wounded in the drug war, and now in need of help himself. The blind Gene Cassidy, shot twice in the head in 1987, still works at the police training academy. Simon, a former police reporter, has turned the cop beat into a celebrated artform, with his book, " Homicide: Life on the Street ," an all-too real glimpse into the city's "Murder Police," and then with the fictionalize HBO series," The Wire ,"which mirrored real life in some uncomfortable ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
Melissa Leo has officially entered overdrive. Her past two years have made even the half-decade she spent playing a Charm City cop in "Homicide" look like a modest accomplishment. She hasn't taken a timeout since she earned a best actress Academy Award nomination for playing a struggling upstate New Yorker who smuggles illegal aliens in "Frozen River" (2008). She has acted in a string of films. "Conviction" with Hilary Swank opened this weekend in Baltimore. "The Dry Land" with America Ferrera appears on DVD next month and "The Fighter" with Mark Wahlberg will start rolling into theaters in December.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2010
Eric Overmyer is a passionate playwright but a reluctant television writer. In his deepest heart, he would like to say "No, no, no," every time someone waves a proposal for a new TV show in his face. But his loudmouth bank account keeps insisting, "Yes, yes, yes." This is true even of such quality projects as "Treme," a show about New Orleans residents coping with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Overmyer created the 10-episode series with Baltimorean David Simon, and it debuts tonight on HBO. Overmyer, 58, thinks the stage is a much more creative medium than television.
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