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NEWS
December 2, 2013
BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Luxembourg City's mayor Xavier Bettel is slated to become the country's next prime minister, following the end of coalition talks on Friday that usher in a Liberal government for the first time in decades. Bettel's swearing-in on December 4 will be part of a week that includes a meeting of a national Malay organization, a campaign-style visit to South Carolina by Texas Governor Rick Perry and the lighting of the Capitol Christmas tree in Washington. Stories related to this gallery: Liberals to lead Luxembourg as coalition talks succeed Underwood getting 'hate tweets' over 'Sound of Music' role When life spirals out of control, Salvation Army helps provide stability In the Gandhi political bastion, India's rural poor eye Modi's promise The agreement between Bettel's Democratic Party, the Socialists and the Greens brings an end to the 19 years in office of Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Union's longest-serving head of government.
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NEWS
Staff Reports | December 1, 2013
The weekend after Thanksgiving not only signals the official start of the Christmas season, but also the start of the Christmas tree hunting season.  For many families, holiday traditions include a visit to a cut-your-own tree farm the weekend of Thanksgiving -- or soon afterward. In Carroll County, there are many options for farms where families can search for the perfect tree, cut it themselves and haul it home. In addition to fresh-cut trees, some farms offer baling, wreaths and greens.  The 2013 version of Christmas Trees and Holiday Greens in Carroll County is available online HERE.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 30, 2013
The Town of Bel Air kicks off the Christmas holiday season this weekend with the annual Festival of Trees and the town parade and tree lighting ceremony. Don't forget to visit the Festival of Trees at the Bel Air Reckord Armory, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, $6 for adults, free for children 12 and under. Decorated trees, wreaths will sold by silent auction and there will be vendors, fresh greens, bake table, children's crafts and activities and entertainment.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
With their miniature French poodle, Marcel, in tow, Thomas and Joan Spence start each morning in Mount Vernon Place, walking past the magnolias and cherry trees and Japanese maples, along the sidewalks and around the footprint of the Washington Monument. The couple, transplants from New York who chose to settle in Baltimore for their golden years, say they're lucky to live near the city landmark and eager for its restoration. But they can't abide one aspect of the plan: removing more than 100 mature trees and replacing them with younger transplanted ones as part of a broader $14.5 million privately funded restoration plan.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
Like Dan Rodricks , I visited Swallow Falls recently and was absolutely amazed at what Mother Nature had wrought ( "County Maryland old-growth trees among Sandy's tragic toll," Nov. 2). She is one tough mother, she gives and she takes away. I shot several dozen pictures trying to capture the scope of the devastation. From ground level, it just looks like a bunch old trees toppled over. When you get close to the trees you see the size and age very clearly. The thing I am amazed about is that Mr. Rodricks' column is the first I have seen about this anywhere in the eastern part of the state.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 2, 2013
Donnie Oates, manager of two great parks in Western Maryland, will never forget Hurricane Sandy's ferocious arrival there. On the last two days of October 2012, the storm brought two feet of heavy snow, high winds, thunder and lightning through Garrett County. Epic stuff. Oates had never seen anything like it. From his house on Maple Glade Road, which leads to Swallow Falls State Park, Oates heard a forest in collapse — trees cracking and popping, trees being uprooted under the weight of the snow, trees hitting the ground and shaking the earth.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Tree roots are pushing up the blacktop in my driveway. They're either from two beautiful white pines or two equally beautiful American hollies. They were planted by the original owners of our 1931 house. I love these trees and don't want to hurt them but would like to repair the driveway. Any suggestions? Except for a few anchor roots, most tree roots are in the top 12-18 inches of soil. Cutting the roots to repave might kill your trees. Removing the driveway and repaving over existing roots may also disrupt the root system enough to kill the trees.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
A man died in a single-vehicle crash in Owings Mills early Saturday morning, police said, after his car veered off the road, struck a utility pole and a tree and caught fire. Baltimore County Police and Fire personnel were called at 3:49 a.m. to Cronridge and Cronhill drives where they found a Chrysler burning with the driver trapped inside. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Police said he has not been positively identified but is in his late 30s. Police said he was driving north on Cronridge Drive, near Cronhill Drive, when he crossed the center line, and veered off of the west side of the road.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Entering the foyer of Irv and Sharon Caplan's rambling rancher-style home just outside Stevenson in Baltimore, a visitor would never know. "What you're walking into is where a tree fell through the house," said Sharon Caplan. The initial horror at seeing their home after it was ravaged by the derecho in the summer of 2012 is now a calm narrative of loss, rebuilding and the renewed understanding of what is most important in life. "We were away at a family wedding in Houston when the storm hit Baltimore and a tree limb went through our beautiful home and then blew out," said the 71-year-old former partner in Manekin LLC, a commercial real estate corporation.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
Supporters of Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park are understandably alarmed by a BGE plan to build a new gas pipeline through the area. The pipeline, which serves about 90,000 customers in the city and county, was one of the first such conduits built in the Baltimore region, and it has been repaired dozens of times since it was first laid in 1949. But the company says it's now reached the end of its useful life and must be replaced. The problem is that building a new pipeline along the original route may be impossible under today's stricter environmental regulations, while the available alternatives could require the company to cut down hundreds of the park's historic and beloved old-growth trees.
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