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NEWS
By Kathy Hudson hudmud@aol.com | May 6, 2014
I wish I had been able to join the students from the GreenMount School in Remington and Independence School in Hampden on Arbor Day as they planted 40 small trees along Stony Run. Besides being fun, initiatives like this one by the Baltimore City Forestry Conservancy and others by organizations like Baltimore Tree Trust and Parks & People Foundation make an impact. Baltimore City has set a goal of doubling the tree canopy from 20 per cent to 40 per cent by 2037. A larger tree canopy adds beauty to a city and helps remove carbon dioxide and pollutants from the air. Engaging students and residents in tree planting and maintenance activities is also a broadening educational experience.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Tourists never come to see the cherry blossoms in West Baltimore, in the heart of what local residents warmly refer to as "the hood. " But they could, as far as Marvin "Doc" Cheatham is concerned. "We could have people ride through, neighbors selling hot dogs and hamburgers, saying, 'You don't got to go to Washington for cherry blossoms!'" Cheatham said this weekend from his front steps in the 1600 block of Appleton St. The block has about 40 occupied homes, 11 boarded-up vacants, and about a dozen cherry trees - planted by the city in the 1970s, as Cheatham recalls.
TRAVEL
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Ocean City wants people to plant more trees. The town has announced a $25 rebate to match a Marylanders Plant Trees state coupon for each tree planted in its area. The 2009 state program gives out coupons for $25 off the purchase of a tree at participating nurseries; Ocean City 's rebate would make that $50. Marylanders Plant Trees surpassed its goal of 100,000 new trees by 2013, according to its website. The state coupon initiative is funded through a settlement against a major power generator for Clean Air Act violations and contributions from tree vendors.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Thank you so much for your article on Catonsville United Methodist Church's beautification project ("Replacing old trees part of plan for future," Catonsville Times, March 19). You did a wonderful job explaining our mission in both replacing the trees and for the new Prayer Garden. As we discussed, I think the Catonsville Times' readership is a knowledgeable group that looks for you to give them insight into important issues in our community. Your reporting inputs from Councilman Tom Quirk and Jim Himel of the Catonsville Tree Canopy Project hopefully gave readers an even better understanding of how this project will benefit the Greater Catonsville community.  Ken Erickson,  facilities manager Catonsville United Methodist Church 
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 1, 2014
When I have a hard time understanding government spending - the construction and tinkering that goes into, say, Maryland's multibillion-dollar annual budget - I just imagine the whole thing as a kitchen-table conversation with members of a household declaring and negotiating priorities. (Pardon the time-worn metaphor, but it works for me.) After we cover the big-ticket items (health, education, roads, public safety, the mandatory areas of spending), we get around to the other pieces of the budget that need to be maintained - public employee pensions, for instance - and arguments break out about obligations, fiscal discipline and not "kicking the can down the road.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
We often hear the clanking of the scaffold as the work is being done on the Washington Monument ( "Washington Monument restoration changes atmosphere of Mount Vernon neighborhood," March 24). Like our neighbors, we look forward to its completion. We realize that restoration of the monument is necessary and is being accomplished to high standards of historic preservation. To the contrary, the massive public works being proposed for the Mount Vernon parks is neither necessary nor can it be considered historic preservation.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Philip Joseph DiPaula, a retired Forest Park and Polytechnic Institute science teacher who received two Purple Hearts during World War II, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Saturday at St. Agnes Hospital. The Edmondson Heights resident was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised on Piedmont Avenue, he was the son of Antonio DiPaula, who owned a North Avenue confectionery and fruit store, and Vincenzina Restivo DiPaula, a homemaker. He was a 1942 graduate of Forest Park High School.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
I want to prune branches out of a tree so the wind will blow through it and it won't fall on my house. Is that possible? The answer is actually counterintuitive. One would think fewer branches would offer less wind resistance, but time lapse photography has shown that wind does not have the same effect on a tree as on a solid surface, where the wind pushes fairly evenly over the entire object. With a tree, wind hits different branches at different moments, causing some to bend with the wind while others are springing back.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
I ordered some trees from North Carolina and the nursery wanted to send them in February. What is a good time to have them delivered? You can't put the trees into the ground until the soil is workable, meaning it's dry enough so a clump crumbles in your hand when squeezed. That time varies from year to year depending on weather. April is a good bet. Sandy soils are ready earlier than clay soils. If the soil is unworkable when your plants arrive, keep them outside in a cool, shady area.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Deer have stripped all the leaves off my evergreen and my Nellie Stevens holly. Will they grow back, or should I cut them down? Some evergreen species tolerate deer "pruning" well and put out new growth in spring, although lower branches won't bounce back as fast as upper branches would. Yew, arborvitae, hemlock and many junipers fall in this category. You'll need to prevent future winter stripping, however, because the evergreen can't recover when this happens repeatedly.
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