Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTrees
IN THE NEWS

Trees

NEWS
July 30, 2014
I know there has been a lot of controversy about the plan for Baltimore County Public Schools to destroy huge, century-old trees behind Dumbarton Middle School and an effort to save the Dumbarton trees ( "Rodgers Forge residents rally for trees," July 2). I am a rising junior at Towson High School. I live next to Dumbarton. The park behind Dumbarton is like the backyard of my childhood. Most of the trees that the school system wants to cut are tied to childhood memories. When I was little, I would hang out with my closest friends by the trees and climb some of them.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Though overnight storms weren't as severe as forecasters had feared, they still downed trees and brought large hail to some areas north of Baltimore. Meteorologists had cautioned of risks of isolated tornadoes across the mid-Atlantic Sunday evening, but those dangers did not materialize. WMAR-TV meteorologist Mike Masco explained that dry air pushing into the region limited severe weather chances over Maryland, while dangerous weather was developing to our north and south. Some powerful storms nonetheless caused damage across northern Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
An $8.5 billion merger creating North America's biggest dollar store chain could mean increased competition for mass discounters such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. but less choice for shoppers. In the Baltimore area and elsewhere, retail experts said, Dollar Tree Inc.'s planned purchase of Family Dollar Stores Inc., announced Monday, likely will lead to some store closings, though the companies have not identified any locations. Dollar Tree, which runs mostly suburban stores and sells a mix of consumables as well as items such as gifts, party goods and greeting cards for $1 or less, has about 55 stores in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
At the funeral Tuesday for Justin Nicholas Diggs, family and friends remembered a child who loved the outdoors, God and helping others. Justin, a 12-year-old Pikesville Middle School honor student, was killed July 8 when a tree fell on him during a violent thunderstorm at River Valley Ranch, a Christian summer camp in the Millers community in Carroll County. Eight other children in the camp were treated for minor injuries. During the service at New Psalmist Baptist Church in Baltimore, camp program director John Zeigenfuse recounted how Justin once told his mother he wasn't calling home often while at River Valley because he was busy helping other campers.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The 12-year-old boy killed by a falling tree during a thunderstorm in Carroll County July 8 has been identified as a Pikesville Middle School student named Justin Diggs. In a statement provided to media outlets, family members described Diggs as an honor student who enjoyed adventurous sports. "He loved to swim, play basketball and loved being outside enjoying extreme activities, such as, zip-lining, bungee jumping and anything adventurous," the statement said. "He also loved to draw.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
One child was killed and eight others were injured by falling tree branches at a Christian summer camp in Carroll County during Tuesday night's storm, a fire department spokesman said. The children were on their way inside at River Valley Ranch in the 4400 block of Grave Run Rd. in Manchester around 7 p.m. when heavy winds brought branches from several trees down on top of them, said Donald Fair, public information officer for the Lineboro Volunteer Fire Department. Fair called the storm "very sudden" and said it caused "massive damage to the trees" in the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Singer and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
For Tyler Glenn, frontman of the Provo, Utah-based pop-rock quartet Neon Trees, seeing a therapist was a breakthrough in more ways than one. “It was definitely a profound thing,” said Glenn recently on the phone from Minneapolis. “I found that it was OK to have anxiety and it was OK to have some of the feelings that I had about myself.” Glenn used his therapy sessions as a creative muse when he began writing songs for April's “Pop Psychology,” Neon Trees' third album, and the therapy gave him the confidence he needed to publicly come out as gay in “Rolling Stone” earlier this year.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 30, 2014
Every summer about this time, I spend a couple of days touring private gardens. And I get paid to do it. I am one of the judges of The Sun's annual Garden Contest, and it might be the best part of my job. We receive between 30 and 60 entries each year, and the other judges and I whittle the list down to between 10 and 20. We schedule the visits, load up my car with icy, cold bottled water and off we go, covering hundreds of miles over two or...
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
When Kay McConnell's daughter moved with the rest of her classmates into Friends School's new middle-school building, the kids seemed out of sorts in the unfamiliar space. It was as if they missed the coziness of the cramped quarters that had been their home. Like the students, the trees that had been planted in the ground around the new structure didn't look happy either. McConnell, a lifelong and self-taught gardener, offered to try to help the plants, at least, feel comfortable in their new space.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
A tree branch broke off and fell onto a car in Glen Arm Friday night, killing the driver and injuring a passenger, Baltimore County police said. Police said a large branch fell on power lines before hitting a Hyundai Sonata going northbound in the 13100 block of Dulaney Valley Road shortly after 11 p.m. The driver, identified as James Walter Power, 60, of Forest Hill, was pronounced dead after being taken to St. Joseph's Medical Center, police said....
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.