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Trees

NEWS
November 28, 2009
Each of the past three years, James Ward of Westminster has sent 5,000 miniature Christmas trees to soldiers overseas, but this year he might have to leave thousands empty-handed. Ward said he has had trouble finding $25 donations for the 2-foot-tall trees that come complete with lights, ornaments and, most importantly, American soil. The foundation, Operation Christmas Tree, started after Ward sent a few dozen trees to his stepdaughter's unit in Iraq in 2006. When he found out how much the troops loved the trees, he decided to expand the operation to troops in countries around the world.
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EXPLORE
February 3, 2012
Symphony Woods Park is one of the Columbia Association's greatest open space system assets, and I, the Registered Landscape Architect at CA, and others are doing our best to ensure that it becomes a great park for the community. In last week's Flier , Joyce Potemkin advocated that residents unite to save 53 trees in Symphony Woods slated for removal. While it is unfortunate that 53 trees could be removed for phase one of the park, the space will retain its wooded character: Hundreds and hundreds of trees will remain.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
An environmental grant has funded tree planting in Annapolis as part of the city's effort to increase its canopy. A grant from the Alliance of the Chesapeake Bay totaling $40,000 was used to plant 233 trees and 153 shrubs, including four willow oaks in the Historic District to replace older trees that were cut down in the summer because of safety concerns, city officials said. The four willow oaks were planted at 183 and 193 Duke of Gloucester St. and at 122 and 123 Conduit St. Those trees replace a willow and northern red oak estimated at 70 to 80 years old, and a Siberian elm about 50 years old. They were each about 40 feet tall, but city arborist Jan Van Zutland examined the trees and declared them in bad health.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
Join a naturalist on a Tree Walk, Sunday, Aug. 4 from 10 to 11 a.m. at the National Wildlife Visitor Center, 10901 Scarlet Tanager Loop, located off Powder Mill Road between the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and Route 197. All ages can discover how to identify local trees by leaf, bark and flower in this informative half-mile hike. Registration is required. Call 301-497-5887 for reservation. Donations to the Friends of Patuxent are appreciated.
EXPLORE
March 23, 2012
I look forward to a time when Columbia's Symphony Woods is home to both active and passive recreation: picnics, walks, splashing, laughter, relaxation, and maybe even a little music. I commend CA for going forward with a plan to enhance the livability of our downtown area. Saturday I attended the opening of Blandair Park. This event was particularly significant to me, as an immediate neighbor in Oakland Mills. As I watched my daughter run off to explore the play equipment, I felt grateful to everyone who made this possible.
NEWS
By William Amelia | February 11, 1992
Colored leaves falland then revealthe shapes of winter's trees,in images surreal.Stick-figures all, stretchedagainst lowering skies,frame a leafless parklandthrough winter's eyes.By the cold streambeds,sycamores peel and grate;at the edge of the wood,bare beeches congregate.There's no leafy camouflagefor winter's birds of prey;now the hawks and elmswait for a longer day.
EXPLORE
February 28, 2013
We have a treasure that some may not appreciate. There are very few remaining stands of old trees, not only in Columbia but in the whole state of Maryland. We once took a special trip to northern Michigan to visit a virgin forest. We are so fortunate to have such a stand of trees in the middle of Columbia and should be thankful to those that had the foresight to preserve it for us and future generations. It should be left in its natural state. Business ventures should be up to those risking their capital and have knowledge of what potential may be derived from that investment.
NEWS
February 15, 1991
Over the past few decades, 40 percent of Maryland's forestland has vanished. If the current rate of tree-cutting continues, the state will lose roughly one-eighth of its forests by the year 2020. The result would seriously damage the environment. Trees help control erosion and serve as a kind of sponge to soak up pollutants before they reach the water table. Trees also act as a buffer to protect water quality in lakes and bays -- and that's especially important for Chesapeake Bay cleanup.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
We often hear the clanking of the scaffold as the work is being done on the Washington Monument ( "Washington Monument restoration changes atmosphere of Mount Vernon neighborhood," March 24). Like our neighbors, we look forward to its completion. We realize that restoration of the monument is necessary and is being accomplished to high standards of historic preservation. To the contrary, the massive public works being proposed for the Mount Vernon parks is neither necessary nor can it be considered historic preservation.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 2, 2010
Forests by the Chesapeake Bay are growing two to four times faster than expected these days, researchers have found - a signal that rising carbon dioxide in our atmosphere might be triggering noticeable changes in ecosystems in the Mid-Atlantic. And though scientists warn it's no panacea, the accelerated growth in stands of hardwoods monitored for the past 22 years is an indication that forests might dampen or delay the impact of climate change at least for a while, by soaking up some of the greenhouse gases that most scientists believe are warming the planet.
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