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By MIKE KLINGAMAN | December 13, 1992
Deck the halls with boughs of holly: It's supposed to protect homes against lightning.'Tis the season to be jolly: The English made beer by boiling young spruce trees during the Middle Ages.Holiday flora is popping up in homes and malls everywhere. There are poinsettias and pine trees, holly and ivy, mistletoe and amaryllis.We see them every winter. But how much do we really know of our favorite yuletide plants?;/ Take The Real Dirt's Christmas Trivia Quiz:TRUE OR FALSE1. Mistletoe can be a naughty plant.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Do I need to keep weeding in fall? There are only a few little weeds, and wouldn't it be better to spend my time, say, pruning? A weed pulled in time saves nine - or 90. Many summer weeds are now loaded with thousands of seeds. Also, many weeds known as winter annuals start now and will explode with growth in spring. Hairy bittercress is one of these; it's is a tidy rosette now and almost a joy to pull, it's so easy. Because it has no seeds yet, you can throw it on the lawn and chop it up when you mow, adding organic matter to improve your topsoil.
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NEWS
May 31, 2012
Your article, "More trees mean less crime, study says," (May 20) was most interesting. A 19th century study revealed that people who lived on tree-lined streets had 50 percent less instance of contracting contagious diseases than those living on non-tree-lined streets. This was the impetus behind the great tree planting efforts of that time. All of this points in one direction - trees have almost boundless benefits for human society and we need many more of them. Joseph Clisham, Baltimore The writer is the former chairman of the Baltimore City Forestry Board.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
A 34-year-old Monkton man was killed in a crash in Glyndon Saturday night, police said. Police identified the man as David Wesley Blizzard, Jr. of the 500 block of Monkton Road. Blizzard was driving eastbound in the 4200 block of Worthington Ave., when his 1992 Honda Accord crossed the opposite side of the street, left the roadway and hit a tree, police said. Emergency responders were called at around 7:45 p.m., and Blizzard, the car's only occupant, was pronounced dead at the scene, police said.
EXPLORE
December 15, 2011
Editor, The Chesapeake Cancer Alliance is very appreciative of the sponsors, donors, volunteers and attendees who supported our recent fundraising event - The CCA Festival of Trees at the Bel Air Armory. All proceeds support Upper Chesapeake Health's Cancer LifeNet programs, which provide support and services to cancer patients in Harford and Cecil counties. Many thanks to our sponsors: Rosedale Federal Savings and Loan, Kissinger Financial Services, Susquehanna OB/GYN- Drs. Bellantoni & Gotzmann, PayPal Inc., Wells Fargo Advisors-Stephen Holland, Bay Counseling Services, Catherine & Vernon Jones, PNC Wealth Management, Taylor Pickett, George's Customs Towing, Churchville Ruritan, Vascular Surgery Associates, Harford Mutual Insurance Co., Harford's Heart and 2K Marketing.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
So now the architects are going to cut down the old trees in Mt. Vernon Park because the tree wells they're in aren't deep enough ("Tree swap is proposed in Mt. Vernon upgrade plan," Sept. 14). Have they never heard that there are old growth trees all over this country in arboretums, parks, town centers, cemeteries and most amazingly the redwood forests in California that have survived for centuries without tree wells? Architects should leave tree planting or, in this case, tree digging-up, to the arborists and other tree experts.
NEWS
July 11, 2011
I am a Baltimore resident who is saddened every year to watch so many city trees die needlessly due to lack of water. The city often does a poor job of planting trees, and I've observed trees being left near the planting sites for days to dry out before they are put in the ground. Then the soil in which they are planted is often poorly amended or completely unimproved. I've witnessed many trees that were planted too low or too high in the ground. Frequently, they are not mulched or sometimes mulched with fresh wood chips which suck some of the nitrogen from the soil, rather than aged mulch which returns nutrients and better retains moisture.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch | January 6, 1992
This holiday season brought some uninvited guests to a few homes where families cut their own Christmas trees -- small colonies of what are commonly called jumping spiders, ferocious-looking but harmless creatures about the size of an aspirin tablet.And while a household with leaping arachnids is few people's idea of a holiday, entomologists and horticulturalists say that reports of these Yuletide insects is an encouraging sign.The spiders are a byproduct, they say, of an estimated 70 percent cut in the use of toxic chemicals to control plant-eating insects on Maryland Christmas tree farms since the mid-1980s.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
I know there has been a lot of controversy about the plan for Baltimore County Public Schools to destroy huge, century-old trees behind Dumbarton Middle School and an effort to save the Dumbarton trees ( "Rodgers Forge residents rally for trees," July 2). I am a rising junior at Towson High School. I live next to Dumbarton. The park behind Dumbarton is like the backyard of my childhood. Most of the trees that the school system wants to cut are tied to childhood memories. When I was little, I would hang out with my closest friends by the trees and climb some of them.
NEWS
September 1, 2011
Childs Walker 's recent article about the power outages ("Down come the trees, and off goes the power," Aug. 29), may be more appropriately titled, "Here come the environmentalists, up go the trees. " Where I live in Baltimore County, when you build you have the tree environmentalists dictating what trees can be removed. The same bureaucrat then dictates what trees you must replace. The county always forces you to add trees. Yet when it comes to utility disruptions, trees are the real culprit.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Pastor Elbert Street noticed a small crack in the wall behind the pulpit at Grace Christian Baptist Church. It widened. Then a branch appeared. A cluster of leaves unfurled. That was when Street realized that something was growing between the walls of his East Baltimore church: an 8-foot-tall tree. The 79-year-old pastor and others took the wall apart, hacked down the tree and hauled away bags of branches and roots. The tree came back. They cut it down again. And then again.
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
An Annapolis man died Saturday when a tree collapsed at a family gathering in Woodbine, authorities said. Three of his grandchildren, aged 9, 10 and 16, suffered minor injuries in the incident on Daisy Road, the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services said. Two were treated at a local hospital and released. The 75-year-old man was grilling outside a home on Daisy Road when the tree collapsed, authorities said. Firefighters and paramedics arrived to find him trapped under the tree.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Doing something about the imminent slaughter of the city's ash trees as a result of arrival of the emerald ash borer in Baltimore should be a rallying cry for citizens to get educated about trees ( "Enemy at the gates," Aug. 26). Through understanding comes action, and what this town needs is more TreeKeepers. Free city-wide TreeKeepers classes are offered this September and I urge everyone to become educated about ash trees, the insects that threaten them and how trees really do function as the lungs of our city.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
Like the arrival of a Medieval plague, alien invaders are knocking on Baltimore's door. No, we are not talking about foreign armies storming the beaches or bug-eyed creatures from outer space bent on global domination. But it's almost as bad. We are referring, of course, to the recent appearance in Baltimore of the emerald ash borer, a species of voracious Asian beetle that since 2006 has killed millions of white and green ash trees in its relentless march across North America. In June, city arborists trapped a couple of the critters in Druid Hill Park, a sure sign that more are on the way. If nothing is done, some 290,000 ash trees on city owned property could be at risk of being wiped out over the next few years.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
A voracious Asian beetle that's killed millions of ash trees across North America has finally been spotted in Baltimore, posing a costly and difficult challenge for a city that stands to lose more than 200,000 of its most common trees to the exotic pest's onslaught. It could denude blocks lined with ash and cost the city millions of dollars to remove dead or dying trees from public lands, while homeowners may be forced to pay hundreds or even thousands to treat or replace their vulnerable trees.
NEWS
By Thomas Neas, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Vacant buildings are many things: signs of decay, eyesores and dangerous. They might also hold a strong relationship to crime. According to frequently updated data provided by Open Baltimore, there is a strong correlation between vacant buildings and certain crimes, such as shootings and homicides. Common assault, a physical attack, increases from neighborhood to neighborhood as the number of vacant houses increases — a trend shared with crime in general. And it does so at a much more pronounced rate than other crimes.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Thanks to Timothy Wheeler for his recent article about Baltimore's tree loss, some reasons for it and the importance of canopy within cities ("Study finds Baltimore, other cities losing trees," Feb. 28). I appreciate city forester Erik Dihle's description of Baltimore's plan for doubling the city's tree canopy by 2037. What was not mentioned as a threat to the longevity of older trees is English ivy. Like a boa constrictor, it can squeeze the life out of a tree. Northern Baltimore, where I live, is rampant with it. My hope is that home owners will recognize this threat and cut the life out of the ivy near the base of their trees before the life in their trees is cut short.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | March 28, 2010
A Howard County parks program that on Monday offered 2,010 young trees free to Howard County residents had such a heavy response that all the trees were spoken for by noon Wednesday. Residents could reserve up to two of five different varieties of native trees, and can pick them up May 1 from one of five locations around the county. Money for the trees, which are up to 5 feet tall, comes from interest from a Forest Conservation Fund that builders pay into if they fail to meet their reforestation requirements.
NEWS
August 3, 2014
I read with great interest the letter by Nicole Goodman ("Spare the Dumbarton trees," Aug. 2) about the trees at Dumbarton Middle School. She referred to the Dumbarton grounds as the "backyard of my childhood. " I grew up across the street from Yorkwood Elementary School in Baltimore. Like Nicole, I regard the beautiful grounds of my school, with its large, shady trees, and the bird sanctuary behind the playground, as the backyard of my childhood. Huge old trees, urban woodlots and trees in our yards and on our streets have a value almost impossible to express for children.
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