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NEWS
September 28, 2008
Maryland Natural Resources Police continued last week to investigate a fatal hunting accident that occurred Sept. 20, on private property near Davidsonville. Joseph Philip Adams, 46, of Glen Burnie was hunting deer from his tree stand, on property in the 2400 block of Rutland Road, when he fell approximately 15 feet to the ground, according to the Natural Resource Police, who said the man was not wearing a safety harness. Adams and a friend were archery hunting from tree stands approximately 80 yards apart when the friend heard Adams call for help.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2011
For those venturing out on the first day of firearm hunting season Sunday, where you shoot from is as important to safety as the weapons of choice. According to George F. Johnson IV, superintendent colonel for the Department of Natural Resources, "tree-stand incidents account for most hunting accidents. " Johnson and others suggest hunters use a full-body safety harness to keep them tethered to the tree. Broken or worn equipment should be replaced or fixed before hunters climb into the stand.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2011
For those venturing out on the first day of firearm hunting season Sunday, where you shoot from is as important to safety as the weapons of choice. According to George F. Johnson IV, superintendent colonel for the Department of Natural Resources, "tree-stand incidents account for most hunting accidents. " Johnson and others suggest hunters use a full-body safety harness to keep them tethered to the tree. Broken or worn equipment should be replaced or fixed before hunters climb into the stand.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2010
A 56-year-old Baltimore County man was in critical condition at Shock Trauma in Baltimore on Saturday after being accidentally shot Friday afternoon while hunting with a friend in Dorchester County on the Eastern Shore. Maryland Natural Resources police said Darryl James Patrylak of Bear Creek was shot by his companion, Gerald Edward Merkle, 58, of Parkville, who was in a tree stand with a 30.06 rifle. Patrylak was wearing camouflage clothing, but not a reflective safety vest or cap, police said, and Merkle mistook him for a deer.
NEWS
December 5, 1997
For the second time this week, a deer hunter has been killed in an accident involving a tree stand, Maryland Department of Natural Resources officials reported.Guy F. Bortmes, 38, was found dead early Wednesday under a tree near his home in the 1300 block of Chrome Hill Road in Jarrettsville, in Harford County, said John Surrick, a department spokesman.Investigators think Bortmes lost his footing when a step leading up to the tree stand broke and he fell 20 feet to the ground, fracturing his skull.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2010
A 56-year-old Baltimore County man was in critical condition at Shock Trauma in Baltimore on Saturday after being accidentally shot Friday afternoon while hunting with a friend in Dorchester County on the Eastern Shore. Maryland Natural Resources police said Darryl James Patrylak of Bear Creek was shot by his companion, Gerald Edward Merkle, 58, of Parkville, who was in a tree stand with a 30.06 rifle. Patrylak was wearing camouflage clothing, but not a reflective safety vest or cap, police said, and Merkle mistook him for a deer.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1996
Last week, one hunter shot and killed another in Western Maryland after mistaking his companion for a deer, and that accidental death is remarkable for several reasons -- the least of which is that the pair was hunting out of season.According to news reports, neither of the men was wearing hunter orange clothing, which is required in many hunting situations and recommended in all.Also according to news reports, the killing shot was fired into an area obscured by brush and trees, without the shooter first confirming his target and ensuring he had a clear field of fire.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | September 19, 1993
Bowhunting season got under way last week and will continue through Nov. 26, when it breaks for the two-week firearms hunt. Archers can go back into their tree stands Dec. 13-17, then from Jan. 3 through Jan. 31.Last year 292 whitetails were bagged by Anne Arundel County archers. The statewide total was a record-smashing 11,240 deer.According to figures furnished by the Department of Natural Resources, 91 percent of last year's successful bowhunters bagged a single deer. The remainder took advantage of the second deer stamp and claimed a double.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | September 19, 1993
Thanks to the efforts of the Carroll County Sportsman's Association and the Department of Natural Resources, the Morgan Run Natural Environment Area and the Carroll County portion of the Patapsco Valley State Park will be open to hunters beginning Nov. 1.These long-awaited actions bring more than 1,000 acres of needed hunting space to deer hunters.The Morgan Run Area targeted for bow and muzzleloader hunting involves approximately 400 acres.Hunting will be limited to 10 randomly chosen permit holders per day and will take place Wednesdays through Saturdays.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1998
The signs of holiday season 1998 are popping up everywhere, even in the cold corridors of officialdom.Oh Christmas Tree, Oh Christmas TreeHow steadfast are your branches!A holiday memo was just sent out from Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service, Gordon Aoyagi, fire administrator: For Immediate Release. The Maryland State Fire Marshal has established minimum requirements for the display of evergreen trees in public buildings. The following is an outline of those requirements.Your boughs are green in summer's climeAnd through the snows of wintertimeCut trees must be only blue spruce, Scotch pine or Douglas fir and must be tagged by the tree grower.
SPORTS
September 25, 2010
Maryland hunters are killing themselves. Two have died so far in just the first week of the season. Before deer hunting ends in January, others will shatter their backs, smash their skulls or snap their arms and legs in falls from tree stands. Early numbers and anecdotal evidence indicate that deer hunting is up this year, most likely driven by a bad economy that has families seeking cheap meat for the freezer. That probably means more hunters with rusty skills and, perhaps, even rustier equipment.
NEWS
September 28, 2008
Maryland Natural Resources Police continued last week to investigate a fatal hunting accident that occurred Sept. 20, on private property near Davidsonville. Joseph Philip Adams, 46, of Glen Burnie was hunting deer from his tree stand, on property in the 2400 block of Rutland Road, when he fell approximately 15 feet to the ground, according to the Natural Resource Police, who said the man was not wearing a safety harness. Adams and a friend were archery hunting from tree stands approximately 80 yards apart when the friend heard Adams call for help.
BUSINESS
By From staff reports | December 25, 2007
It was a Christmas Eve where, at least in some parts, procrastinating paid off in a big way. The day started with an unexpected shipment of 67 Nintendo Wii game systems -- the most sought-after, but hardest-to-find, item of the year -- arriving at Best Buy in White Marsh. General Manager Dave Wolf chose not to display the game systems to avoid a mob scene. Instead employees walked around the store telling people they were available.
NEWS
December 4, 2005
Jewelry store reopens down street One week after a five-alarm blaze forced Zachary's Exquisite Jewelry from its Main Street location in downtown Annapolis, the high-end jewelry store has reopened just a few doors away. The family-owned business set up shop Friday at 100 Main St. and continues operations today with a weekend sale. Customers will receive 20 percent off all purchases. The new space was provided by Harvey Blonder, owner of Zachary's former location at 122 Main St., which was destroyed by a fire last month that also ripped through two other commercial buildings downtown.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | March 2, 2003
Where do you draw the line on making hunting more accessible? Electronic calls? Motorized decoys? Baiting? For a lot of bow-and-arrow purists, the line is crossbows. Don't want them. Don't need them. Shouldn't allow them. The crossbow debate will move next week from rod and gun clubs and Web chat rooms to Annapolis. It was bound to happen sooner or later. The Environmental Matters Committee will have a hearing at 1 p.m. on March 12 on a bill to allow able-bodied hunters to use crossbows during any season a bow can be used.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | January 12, 2003
SANTA CLARITA, Calif. - The battle over an ancient oak tree - home to tree-sitter John Quigley for 10 weeks - came to an exciting but peaceful close late Friday as sheriff's deputies forced the chained protester from his perch. Quigley was lowered from the 400-year-old oak - a huge tree that stands in the path of a planned highway widening - in a county Fire Department "cherry picker." He walked onto solid ground about 11 p.m. "The tree is still standing. ... The community has been awakened," Quigley told a crowd of several hundred supporters who greeted him with cheers and hugs.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2002
Deer season began yesterday New Windsor, Carroll County, with the crack of an eggshell rather than the crack of a rifle shot. Rib-sticking breakfast -- St. Luke's Lutheran Church style -- was served by a hardy band of women who rose shortly after midnight to begin preparing the feast. The first dozen men in camouflage were waiting for the church doors to open at 3:30. They admitted that without the $4.75 breakfast, they'd be scrounging in the refrigerator for Thanksgiving leftovers, stopping at a convenience store, or worse.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 9, 2001
The big season is over for another year. Deer hunters who only tote modern firearms will have to wait until Nov. 30, 2002 to hit the woods again. For 10-year-old Casey Kennedy it will be a fall to remember for a long time. The Talbot County boy was hunting with his big brother, Kelly, 19, after school on Nov. 27, when Casey shot a 12-point, 166-pound buck. "We were in the stand and we heard something," says Casey, who stands 4 feet 2 and weighs 65 pounds. "We saw two big bucks and then a third one. They were in the brush and turning away when my brother grunted and turned them around.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2002
Deer season began yesterday New Windsor, Carroll County, with the crack of an eggshell rather than the crack of a rifle shot. Rib-sticking breakfast -- St. Luke's Lutheran Church style -- was served by a hardy band of women who rose shortly after midnight to begin preparing the feast. The first dozen men in camouflage were waiting for the church doors to open at 3:30. They admitted that without the $4.75 breakfast, they'd be scrounging in the refrigerator for Thanksgiving leftovers, stopping at a convenience store, or worse.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 9, 2001
The big season is over for another year. Deer hunters who only tote modern firearms will have to wait until Nov. 30, 2002 to hit the woods again. For 10-year-old Casey Kennedy it will be a fall to remember for a long time. The Talbot County boy was hunting with his big brother, Kelly, 19, after school on Nov. 27, when Casey shot a 12-point, 166-pound buck. "We were in the stand and we heard something," says Casey, who stands 4 feet 2 and weighs 65 pounds. "We saw two big bucks and then a third one. They were in the brush and turning away when my brother grunted and turned them around.
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