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Tree Planting

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NEWS
July 8, 1991
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources announced recently that community matching grants are now available for tree-planting projects.The funds are available through the National Tree Planting Program of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Under the program, communities contract with small businesses for the purchase and planting of trees on lands owned by local governments.For grant applications, call Gene Piotrowski of the Urban and Community Forestry Division of the Department of Natural Resources at (301)
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NEWS
By Kathy Hudson hudmud@aol.com | May 6, 2014
I wish I had been able to join the students from the GreenMount School in Remington and Independence School in Hampden on Arbor Day as they planted 40 small trees along Stony Run. Besides being fun, initiatives like this one by the Baltimore City Forestry Conservancy and others by organizations like Baltimore Tree Trust and Parks & People Foundation make an impact. Baltimore City has set a goal of doubling the tree canopy from 20 per cent to 40 per cent by 2037. A larger tree canopy adds beauty to a city and helps remove carbon dioxide and pollutants from the air. Engaging students and residents in tree planting and maintenance activities is also a broadening educational experience.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 23, 2013
In a heart-warming ceremony earlier this month, the sons of the late Amanda Torbit of Jarrettsville planted and dedicated a tree in their mother's memory at Eden Mill Nature Center in northern Harford County. The tree planting was an expression of appreciation for the both the life of Ms. Torbit and the strong bonds within the community where she lived, one of the organizers explained. Ms. Torbit, who was 33, was expecting her third son when she suffered an aneurysm and died on Sept.
TRAVEL
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Ocean City wants people to plant more trees. The town has announced a $25 rebate to match a Marylanders Plant Trees state coupon for each tree planted in its area. The 2009 state program gives out coupons for $25 off the purchase of a tree at participating nurseries; Ocean City 's rebate would make that $50. Marylanders Plant Trees surpassed its goal of 100,000 new trees by 2013, according to its website. The state coupon initiative is funded through a settlement against a major power generator for Clean Air Act violations and contributions from tree vendors.
NEWS
March 27, 1998
Volunteers from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Cub Scouts and other individuals plan to spend Sunday afternoon planting cuttings that they hope will grow into trees along Little Pipe Creek in Union Bridge.The planting is part of a state-sponsored rehabilitation and wetland restoration to reduce flooding that periodically sends Little Pipe Creek over its banks.Volunteers will plant cuttings from willows that will root in eight months to a year "as long as the stream doesn't wash them away," said Jennifer Hicks, habitat restoration trainer for the foundation.
NEWS
By Kathy Hudson hudmud@aol.com | May 6, 2014
I wish I had been able to join the students from the GreenMount School in Remington and Independence School in Hampden on Arbor Day as they planted 40 small trees along Stony Run. Besides being fun, initiatives like this one by the Baltimore City Forestry Conservancy and others by organizations like Baltimore Tree Trust and Parks & People Foundation make an impact. Baltimore City has set a goal of doubling the tree canopy from 20 per cent to 40 per cent by 2037. A larger tree canopy adds beauty to a city and helps remove carbon dioxide and pollutants from the air. Engaging students and residents in tree planting and maintenance activities is also a broadening educational experience.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1994
CLARIFICATIONAn article in Tuesday's edition of The Sun for Carroll County failed to note that Ruth Anderson of Bishop Court, Westminster, told City Council members that she had been barred from taking down a tree in front of her house unless she acquired a $10 permit, paid to have the tree cut down and the stump ground up, and replaced the tree.The Westminster City Council came a little closer last night to consensus on how the city can work with property owners to plant street trees and who will be responsible for maintaining them.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
All Susan Colligan wants to know is what exactly it's going to take to get her street trees. Obviously something more than filling out the application. Obviously something more than winning the support of her block, her community association and her City Council representative. The dozens of e-mails she's sent to everyone from Baltimore's arborist to Mayor Martin O'Malley - obviously those aren't working either. In a city that's been boasting about doubling the size of its tree canopy over the next 30 years, Colligan thought getting a few maples or elms for the 900 block of S. Baylis St. would be no problem.
NEWS
April 14, 1996
3 towns recognized for commitment to forestsThe Maryland Department of Natural Resources recognized Westminster, Hampstead and Manchester yesterday for their commitment to tree planting and community forests.The towns were honored at the fourth annual People Loving and Nurturing Trees (PLANT) Community Awards at Allen Pond in Bowie, Prince George's County.Plant community awards are given to Maryland communities that participate in an active tree-planting and care program.Pub Date: 4/14/96
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | April 6, 1993
Landmark trees, three towns and the late Earl Yingling will be given tributes at Carroll's annual Arbor Day ceremony tomorrow in Manchester.Jim Slater, Office of the Environment administrator, will present framed certificates to the owners of several trees that have been designated as landmarks because of their size, age or unique qualities.Among the recipients are Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. Hierstetter of Westminster, who have been recognized for a silver maple that features a crown with a 90-foot spread.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 23, 2013
In a heart-warming ceremony earlier this month, the sons of the late Amanda Torbit of Jarrettsville planted and dedicated a tree in their mother's memory at Eden Mill Nature Center in northern Harford County. The tree planting was an expression of appreciation for the both the life of Ms. Torbit and the strong bonds within the community where she lived, one of the organizers explained. Ms. Torbit, who was 33, was expecting her third son when she suffered an aneurysm and died on Sept.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
More than 100 gloved volunteers, some in boots and others in waist-high waders, streamed along narrow paths and historic sea walls Saturday in a secluded nook of wetlands just south of Fort McHenry, their eyes scanning for trash or the perfect spot to plant a sapling. The volunteer cleanup and tree-planting event mostly centered on collecting garbage and removing large pieces of driftwood smothering growth areas for grasses. But from time to time, a more novel item turned up. "Here's a tennis ball," said Gail Hoffer, 48, a volunteer from Elkridge, who decided to join the cleanup after getting an email about it from the National Aquarium in Baltimore , where she's a member.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
Four years ago, employees at the Howard County Office of Environmental Sustainability came up with an idea for people who want to do their part for Earth Day but don't know where to start. It's called the 20-Minute Cleanup - essentially a way to urge people, either on a whim or through precise planning, to pitch in to aid the environment. "Every year, just before Earth Day, the county government would get a lot of calls from people saying,'We want to do something for the environment, what's going on?
NEWS
December 28, 2012
We have to think more creatively about how we protect both trees and power lines ("A bid to trim power outages," Dec. 23). As Jamie Smith Hopkins ' article noted, we can no more be asked to choose between trees or power than we can be asked to choose between eating or drinking. Both are necessary. Here is one proposal to get us closer to having both. We all understand that given the sometimes unfortunate placement of trees and wires, trees must come down. But currently, BGE is not required to replace every tree it takes down.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Congress has proposed a bill for some $60 billion for relief for people caught up in the destruction from Hurricane Sandy ("Sandy aid bill would include more for Md.," Dec. 20). Interestingly enough, not only The Sun but Washington newspapers reported on this and also offered the observation that the GOP was delaying passage of the bill because they wanted it decreased. It appears, however, that much of that $60 billion is pork. According to several Republican congressmen, there is $188 million for an Amtrak project, $5.3 billion for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for unspecified projects, $125 million for restoring watersheds destroyed by wildfires and drought and $50 million in subsidies for tree planting on private property.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
To help mark the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, tree plantings are scheduled this weekend, and also in November, in the Loch Raven and Prettyboy watersheds. Both the Gunpowder Valley Conservancy and the Prettyboy Watershed Alliance will each host plantings on Saturday, Oct. 20, and the Prettyboy group will also conduct a planting on Saturday, Nov. 10.  The new trees are intended to help protect both the Loch Raven and Prettyboy reservoirs from runoff, and will also absorb pollutants that would otherwise enter the water supply. Together, the two reservoirs provide drinking water to 1.8 million people in the region every day. The Prettyboy Watershed Alliance received two grants from the Chesapeake Bay Trust, totaling $5,666, which will be used to plant 500 trees.
NEWS
By Jamie Manfuso and Jamie Manfuso,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2001
The Friends of Carroll County Streams expects to receive a donation of 1,000 trees and shrubs for its first restoration project, tree planting along a tributary of the south branch of the Patapsco River on April 7. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation has pledged 800 trees and shrubs - worth $6,000 - for the stream-bank reforestation project on a 300-acre state-owned tract off Hoods Mill Road near Sykesville. The Department of Natural Resources will contribute 200 trees, the group said. The group will meet at 7 p.m. today at Bear Branch Nature Center.
NEWS
June 30, 2002
The Walnut Council is co-sponsoring a conference, "Quality Hardwoods/Quality Water - Hardwood Establishment and Management for Watershed Restoration," as part of its 2002 international meeting July 28-31 at Clarion Hotel and Conference Center, Hagerstown. The conference, which also is sponsored by the Potomac Watershed Partnership, Maryland Cooperative Extension and Maryland Department of Natural Resources Forest Service, will discuss hardwood tree planting in the United States. Hardwood tree planting has greatly increased in recent years, especially in the mid-Atlantic region in response to initiatives to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay. But the scale and diversity of the planting under way raises concerns of how to successfully plant and manage these species in field situations.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 20, 2012
Earth Day weekend is upon us.  I can tell because my email inbox is jammed with pitches for "green" products and corporate campaigns: Clothing made from recycled plastic bottles; natural skin care products; hybrid auto accessories, even pet waste collection bags. Marketing has its place, I suppose. But in keeping with the origins of Earth Day, there are plenty of opportunities to demonstrate concern about the state of our planet and community, without having to buy stuff. Here are some: Baltimore Green Works is holding a week's worth of activities from April 21 to April 28 in celebration of Earth Day. On Saturday, there'll be tree plantings and other activities in the morning, followed by EcoFest at Druid Hill Park from noon to 5 p.m. Gardening workshops, hikes and walks, bike rides, entertainment and a tree giveaway.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 22, 2012
Maryland's first state forester earned some modern-day recognition Wednesday, when the Board of Public Works voted to name 1,000 acres of woods in Dorchester County for Fred W. Besley . Named state forester in 1906, Besley had been handpicked for the job by Gifford Pinchot, the first chief of the U.S. Forest Service.  Maryland was the third state to create a forestry program at a time when the state's forests had been seriously depleted by settlement, farming and industry.  He spent 36 years promoting public and private conservation, inventorying the state's forests, fighting fires and organizing reforestation efforts.  He established a tree nursery in 1914 - the accompanying photo shows him collecting seeds from pine cones in the 1920s - and he pioneered the Big Tree Champion program, which has grown into a nationwide contest to identify the largest trees of every species.
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