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By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
Hiking with a 50-pound backpack for the better part of a day is physically demanding, but doing so up the side of a mountain is exhausting. Wendy Cirko found that out the hard way. She could have been sitting on a couch in her Bel Air home, watching TV, she said. But as she grabbed tufts of grass to help her on the steep ascent, all the while trying not to think about how far she could fall if she weren't careful, she couldn't help wondering what she had gotten herself into. All this came on just Day Three of her 77-day National Outdoor Leadership School program, a three-part trip through New Zealand that included about 40 days of backpacking, about 30 days of kayaking and about 10 days aboard a 40-foot sailboat.
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SPORTS
By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
Hiking with a 50-pound backpack for the better part of a day is physically demanding, but doing so up the side of a mountain is exhausting. Wendy Cirko found that out the hard way. She could have been sitting on a couch in her Bel Air home, watching TV, she said. But as she grabbed tufts of grass to help her on the steep ascent, all the while trying not to think about how far she could fall if she weren't careful, she couldn't help wondering what she had gotten herself into. All this came on just Day Three of her 77-day National Outdoor Leadership School program, a three-part trip through New Zealand that included about 40 days of backpacking, about 30 days of kayaking and about 10 days aboard a 40-foot sailboat.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1996
Seventy years ago, when a park of grass, sycamores and maples ran down the middle of Wilkens Avenue, one bold resident thought it would be a good idea to change the road's name.Westbound drivers of the No. 9 streetcar had to contend with the late afternoon sun, but Sunset Boulevard never caught on. Still, the memory of the old Wilkens Avenue has a strong hold over the people who live along it, and residents from three city neighborhoods are discussing whether they can create a tree-lined boulevard again.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Neighborhood: Ashburton Location: Northwest Baltimore Average sales price: $141,000 (January-June) Notable features: Beautiful single-family homes - some brick - and lots of mature trees. An old-money feel without the price tag. Directly to the south is Hanlon Park, with Lake Ashburton. A 2002 study of city neighborhoods, prepared by Johns Hopkins University graduate students, called Ashburton "a well-defined enclave in northwest Baltimore that has established itself as the home of Baltimore's black elite."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | June 21, 2009
An apparent tornado knocked down power lines and tree limbs Saturday afternoon in the Essex and Rockaway Beach sections of Baltimore County, authorities said. A tree landed on a house in the 900 block of Lance Avenue, fire officials said. The family was displaced, but no one was injured. Police began receiving reports of storm damage about 4 p.m., including tree branches blocking roads. More than three dozen houses sustained minor damage, said Baltimore County Fire Department spokeswoman Elise Armacost.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | June 3, 2007
There's always lots of activity within earshot of Maryland City Park, be it kids playing on the playground, canines chasing their friends, or, behind a thick line of trees, thousands of cars whizzing down the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. But about a month ago, park-goers could hear something else on the western outskirts of Anne Arundel County: foresters chopping to the ground a stand of leafy trees that extended more than 100 yards along a walking trail, all to clear a path for airplanes.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
The architectural heritage of Carroll County is preserved among the 19th-century homes and tree-lined streets of Uniontown.The village is one of the oldest in the county, dating back to the late 18th century.Situated on a large tract of land that was known as "The Orchard," this land was granted to an Englishman named Metcalf from the West Indies.It then passed out of Metcalf's hands by a deed in 1802 toErhart Cover, who had the land laid out in lots by a local surveyor,John Hyder.The original name of the village was "The Forks," so named because of Buffalo Road and Hagerstown Pike coming together at the western end of town.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Neighborhood: Ashburton Location: Northwest Baltimore Average sales price: $141,000 (January-June) Notable features: Beautiful single-family homes - some brick - and lots of mature trees. An old-money feel without the price tag. Directly to the south is Hanlon Park, with Lake Ashburton. A 2002 study of city neighborhoods, prepared by Johns Hopkins University graduate students, called Ashburton "a well-defined enclave in northwest Baltimore that has established itself as the home of Baltimore's black elite."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 29, 1999
SURDULICA, Yugoslavia -- The old man named Vojislav Milic wandered aimlessly through the mud, shattered glass and smashed tiles that lay along Zmaj Jovina Street yesterday. A cloth cap was tucked low over his unkempt hair, his face was unshaven and his eyes were rimmed red. The house he had built with his sweat, the one that was considered the neighborhood's safest, was a wreck, a pile of concrete slabs and twisted steel. And his family was gone, his wife, son, daughter-in-law, two grandchildren, and a grand niece, swallowed up in the rubble of a NATO bombing mission gone horribly wrong.
BUSINESS
By Lynn Marie Honeywill and Lynn Marie Honeywill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2004
Scott and Sue McGovern's Canton rowhouse once suited their "fun, just-married, pre-kids adventure in the city" just fine. When they decided to start a family, however, "we wanted some grass under our feet," said Scott McGovern, 37, an architect. "But we still didn't want to feel isolated from downtown and those restaurants in Canton that we like." Conventional suburbs struck them as "sterile." So, in 2000, the McGoverns found the right fit in Anneslie, a tree-canopied Towson-area neighborhood.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | June 21, 2009
An apparent tornado knocked down power lines and tree limbs Saturday afternoon in the Essex and Rockaway Beach sections of Baltimore County, authorities said. A tree landed on a house in the 900 block of Lance Avenue, fire officials said. The family was displaced, but no one was injured. Police began receiving reports of storm damage about 4 p.m., including tree branches blocking roads. More than three dozen houses sustained minor damage, said Baltimore County Fire Department spokeswoman Elise Armacost.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Brent Jones and Frank D. Roylance and Brent Jones,Sun Reporters | June 11, 2008
The region's late-spring heat wave ended with a bang overnight as a barrage of showers and thunderstorms pummeled the area, cutting power, toppling trees and frightening drivers. More than 58,000 customers in Central Maryland had lost power by 10 p.m. as the storms rolled toward the Baltimore region, according to BGE. The wind and rain boiled up ahead of a cool front moving out of the Midwest, which is expected to reduce the humidity that has smothered the area since Saturday. However, the storms that brought the cooler weather were fierce - and nearly fatal.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | June 3, 2007
There's always lots of activity within earshot of Maryland City Park, be it kids playing on the playground, canines chasing their friends, or, behind a thick line of trees, thousands of cars whizzing down the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. But about a month ago, park-goers could hear something else on the western outskirts of Anne Arundel County: foresters chopping to the ground a stand of leafy trees that extended more than 100 yards along a walking trail, all to clear a path for airplanes.
BUSINESS
By MARIE GULLARD and MARIE GULLARD,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 30, 2006
Richard and Key-Key von Lange wasted no time last August snatching up the Guilford home of their dreams. "We stole this house," said Key-Key von Lange, who said the couple had been house-hunting fruitlessly in Federal Hill. "We heard about it, went up the next day, took one look and said, `We're done.'" The home that abruptly ended the couple's search is a 3,200-square-foot English cottage, built in 1924 by Baltimore architect Edward L. Palmer Jr., designer of numerous early-20th-century revival-style homes in North Baltimore.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
Strong rain followed by wind gusts of up to 56 mph created havoc for Baltimore-area residents yesterday, knocking out power to tens of thousands, halting Inner Harbor water taxi service, causing thousands of children to leave school early and forcing librarians in Hereford to check books out the old-fashioned way. The blustery weather, which meteorologists say is a sure sign of winter's arrival, left about 119,000 customers in the region without power...
BUSINESS
By Lynn Marie Honeywill and Lynn Marie Honeywill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2004
Scott and Sue McGovern's Canton rowhouse once suited their "fun, just-married, pre-kids adventure in the city" just fine. When they decided to start a family, however, "we wanted some grass under our feet," said Scott McGovern, 37, an architect. "But we still didn't want to feel isolated from downtown and those restaurants in Canton that we like." Conventional suburbs struck them as "sterile." So, in 2000, the McGoverns found the right fit in Anneslie, a tree-canopied Towson-area neighborhood.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2000
Raking leaves in Baltimore can be like the Bill Murray movie "Groundhog Day," in which the same inexplicable circumstances are continually replayed. Residents see fliers asking them to rake their leaves to the curb by a deadline so that city trucks can vacuum them up. They dutifully rake to the curb, but the trucks never show, and winter rains turn the piles to muddy slabs of sludge that people shovel into trash bags come spring. The next fall, it's deja vu all over again. The fliers appear.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 12, 2002
Riverside Park does not lie along the banks of a river, but it's close enough to warrant the picturesque name. Technically speaking, this quaint neighborhood is not considered part of Federal Hill, nor does it exactly belong to Locust Point. Still, comfortably situated under the watchful night illumination of the neon Domino Sugar sign that dominates the southern shore of the Patapsco River, it is a delightful enclave in the revitalized and historic area that is South Baltimore. Riverside Park, an easy five-minute drive from the bustling Inner Harbor, is roughly bounded on the north by Fort Avenue, on the west by Light and Hanover streets and on the east by Key Highway.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
Approaching four decades after the city devised a roadmap to transform the rat-infested, industrial Inner Harbor into Baltimore's rec room, the famed waterfront is at another turning point. The extraordinary success of the original plan, which draws millions to the harbor each year, has produced a new set of traffic and green space problems that Baltimore planners and developers are hoping to fix with a new $200,000 master plan. The original model called for a big shoreline park surrounded by housing and offices.
NEWS
By Jill Zarend-Kubatko and Jill Zarend-Kubatko,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2003
They're tucked away in residential neighborhoods, alongside marinas and on the Chesapeake Bay's tributaries. But for those who don't have a navigational system in their car or boat, Anne Arundel County's picturesque waterfront restaurants can be tricky to find. A trek to Deep Creek Restaurant in Arnold, Windows on the Bay or the Cheshire Crab in Pasadena - with a left turn here and a right turn there - takes a visitor through tree-lined neighborhoods, past rows of boats suspended on lifts and ends in laid-back culinary delights.
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