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NEWS
May 20, 2014
In the past few days, we have seen horror stories about the lack of treatment given to our veterans at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. And once again, it's a system that continues to be broken and nothing is being done to resolve it. Just like last year's stories about Baltimore having the worst claims office in the country, it's just a symptom of what goes on in the entire agency. I retired from the U.S. Army Reserves last year (with seven years of active duty). I've had a claim pending since 2009 that was in appeal until the VA abruptly closed it because they lost my paperwork (they said I never sent it in on time even though I have a dated receipt from them showing they got it)
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NEWS
May 19, 2014
What is it going to take for society to realize that treating mental Illness is a serious issue that needs funding and major revamping in this state ( "WMAR barricade suspect had been hospitalized for mental illness, mother says," May 14)? I had the very uncomfortable task of requesting a petition for emergency evaluation for a person suffering mental illness and drug and alcohol abuse before a judge in the Circuit Court of Anne Arundel County a few weeks ago. The judge, understanding the seriousness of the situation, granted the petition and expressed a verbal "good luck" to me with his order.
FEATURES
Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
International pop star Lorde was busy performing at the Preakness this weekend, but before she did she squeezed in a late night nail treatment - thanks to an unsuspecting Baltimore salon owner. "The mgr of the nail salon I just visited stayed open until 10:30 p.m. on a Friday night for me (and not because of da famez, she had no idea)" she said on her Twitter account @lordemusic Friday. The 17-year-old Grammy winner talked up Baltimore's City Nails and Spa to her 1.61 million Twitter followers this weekend.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
One of the marvels of the Internet to date is that it's largely been a level playing field where there is equal access to all (at least those not blocked by oppressive governments), an arrangement that has not only encouraged innovation and investment but greatly benefited ordinary consumers. U.S. officials keep claiming to support so-called "net neutrality," but interpretations of what that means seem to vary widely. At least that explains how last week the Federal Communications Commission could issue rules that reportedly uphold net neutrality but also raise the possibility of pay-for-preference treatment.
SPORTS
David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
After winning the 139th Preakness on Saturday, California Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn went out of his way to praise the hospitality he received while in Baltimore this week. But he also made some pointed remarks about the way his group was treated two weeks earlier at Churchill Downs for the Kentucky Derby. While he wouldn't go into great detail, he said the treatment there factored in his co-owner Perry Martin's decision not to attend the Preakness. “The hospitality we received at Churchill Downs wasn't very good, and Perry Martin, he decided that he and his family were going to watch the race some [other]
NEWS
May 13, 2014
Johns Hopkins Hospital's refusal to openly negotiate with its underpaid health care workers is beyond embarrassing but unfortunately revealing of some of the real operating values of this world class institution ( "Thousands gather to protest pay at Hopkins Hospital," May 10). As its' own Bloomberg School of Public Health has researched and demonstrated again and again, one's environment is as important a determinant of health as what goes on inside one's body. Workers who come in every day exhausted, stressed and worried about their family's welfare cannot portray an example of health and well being that the hospital portends is one of its primary values.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
At a lab on the edge of the Johns Hopkins University's East Baltimore medical campus, researchers grow tumors on mice so they can try and cure them. But one day, the cancer wouldn't grow. They tried again and again for months. Figuring there must be something different about this batch of mice, they finally discovered the rodents had been given a drug to prevent pinworm. Three years later, the common parasite treatment that retails for a few dollars a dose is being given to terminal brain cancer patients in a trial that could lead to more widespread use. Researchers who toiled for years for such a discovery said they still are investigating how it works.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | April 28, 2014
When Samuel Bierman and Zachary Snitzer opened Maryland Addiction Recovery Center last January, they'd done their homework. The co-founders knew they wanted to be in Maryland, particularly Baltimore County. But they chose Towson, where their center is located at 110 West Road, for a few reasons. "It's centralized, and easy to reach," said Bierman, executive director, "and the biggest group needing help are 15-to-30 year-olds. That's a major demographic in this area," a reference to the local college scene.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 21, 2014
The president's lap dog blew his dog whistle. In case you didn't know, in politics a "dog whistle" is coded language that has a superficial meaning for everybody, but also a special resonance for certain constituencies. Using dog whistles lets politicians deny they meant to say anything nasty, bigoted or controversial. Speaking to the National Action Network the day after a testy but racially irrelevant exchange with Republican members of a House panel, Attorney General Eric Holder said, "The last five years have been defined ... by lasting reforms even in the face of unprecedented, unwarranted, ugly and divisive adversity.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Columbia resident Michael Osborne couldn't process the news when he was first diagnosed with a rare form of lung cancer back in May 2008. "It was horrifying," he said. "I called my wife, and we cried a lot. I was thinking 'You die of this disease, period.' " But after nearly a year of treatment, which included multiple surgeries and the removal of a portion of his right lung, Osborne, 57, has been cancer-free since March 2009. Now he is organizing the second annual Breathe Deep Columbia 5K Walk, to raise awareness of the disease, collect funds for lung cancer research and create a community of survivors and their loved ones.
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