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NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | August 17, 2008
Every year, an estimated 12,000 heroin addicts are arrested and processed through Baltimore's downtown booking and pretrial jails. And there are hundreds more who arrive treating their addictions with methadone. But for those who can't make bail, staying behind bars has long meant no methadone - the leading medication to ease painful withdrawal symptoms and a proven strategy to keep addicts off of heroin and clear of criminal lifestyles. Now, that's changing. Maryland's new program to dispense methadone to heroin addicts who are held at the Baltimore jail awaiting trial has rapidly grown into one of the nation's largest efforts to deliver the addiction treatment behind bars.
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NEWS
July 3, 2009
A generation ago, former Baltimore Mayor Kurt Schmoke urged lawmakers to consider abandoning the criminal justice model for dealing with the country's rampant drug problem and to focus instead on treating people for their addictions. He was roundly criticized for the idea, and America went on to prosecute a fruitless "war on drugs" that two decades later it is still clearly losing. But last week, city health officials announced a small but significant victory in that struggle that may yet vindicate Mr. Schmoke's more humanistic approach to the scourge of substance abuse.
NEWS
July 25, 2001
DRUG COURTS have proven their worth when appropriate treatment and supervision are available. They can save money on jails and police, welfare and health. They can lower crime rates and contribute to a stronger social fabric and safer communities. They can also salvage lives. Critics will point to the failures in relapses, rearrests and convictions of people who go through drug court. Yet time and again, studies have shown that these rates of failure are significantly higher for those who do not go through drug court or similar post-arrest monitored treatment.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2010
Southbound traffic headed to the Harbor Tunnel slowed Monday morning after a chain-reaction crash involving four vehicles blocked the left lane of Interstate 895, according to a Maryland Transportation Authority Police spokesman. Medics responded to the collision, reported just past exit 12 at about 7:20 a.m., but the injured declined treatment at the scene, said Sgt. Jonathan Green of the Maryland Transportation Authority Police. The right lane and shoulder remained open, he said, and the scene was cleared by 7:51 a.m., although traffic continued to be slow after that.
FEATURES
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES SERVICE Sun intern Young Chang contributed to this report | August 9, 1998
Given all the products that have come and gone over the years claiming to rid the body of cellulite, it's OK to be skeptical about the latest miracle treatment.But: There is a new, noninvasive treatment for that patchwork quilt of skin and fat that is the bane of thighs worldwide. And unlike some of its more dubious cousins, the new therapy - called Endermologie - earned approval from the Food and Drug Administration in May as "an effective treatment for temporarily reducing the appearance of cellulite."
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2005
When Larry Wilson heard that city officials were going to give out treatment slots to drug addicts yesterday, he knew that he had to get his friend Gregory Howard downtown and that they should arrive early. In a city with thousands of addicts, 60 slots would go quickly. Wilson delivered. He and Howard -- a heroin addict for 30 years -- were among the first to arrive for Baltimore's Chemical Independence Day, an event that spotlighted local treatment clinics and provided free HIV testing.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent advisory panel, recently recommended that healthy men not be given PSA blood tests to detect prostate cancer. But that won't mean the end of diagnosis and treatment of the disease, the most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death in American men. Dr. E. James Wright, associate professor and director of the Division of Reconstructive and Neurological Urology and chief of urology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, answers questions about diagnosis and the latest treatments, including measures to mitigate side effects such as incontinence and impotence.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | January 5, 2006
Doctors have revived a 50-year-old method of delivering chemotherapy, reporting today that infusions through the abdominal wall can add more than a year of life for patients with advanced cases of ovarian cancer. On the downside, the treatment produced side effects so unpleasant that half the patients stopped it early. The report, published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, prompted an announcement by the National Cancer Institute that the technique confers "a significant survival benefit" and should be the preferred treatment for women with the advanced disease.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 20, 2014
I have a question for George Will. If he can't answer it, maybe Brit Humecan. Both men were recently part of a panel on "Fox News Sunday" to which moderator Chris Wallace posed this question: Has race played a role in the often-harsh treatment of President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder? Wallace was reacting to a clip of Mr. Holder strongly hinting that a testy encounter with House Republicans was part of a pattern of race-based abuse of himself and the president. Some of the panelists framed their answers in political dimensions, i.e., what does this mean for the midterms?
NEWS
By John J. Boronow and Steven S. Sharfstein | December 29, 2013
Treatment refusal occurs in medical/surgical settings across the world every day: a child with leukemia resisting a painful bone-marrow biopsy, an elderly man with Alzheimer's fighting his medication, a woman awakening from a coma and demanding release. And in most instances, "society" - as represented by the family, the health care providers and our legal institutions - has well-established, ethical, effective and efficient mechanisms for enabling the treatment to proceed. But that same society frequently fails people with severe mental illness who also have a related affliction known as "anosognosia" - essentially the inability to recognize one's own illness, however obvious it may be to everyone else.
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