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NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2001
County health officials, a deputy state's attorney and drug counselors urged the Carroll commissioners yesterday to develop what officials believe would be the first heroin treatment program for inmates at a Maryland detention center. "We would like to expand services at the Carroll County Detention Center to include an eight-bed unit for heroin users 18 to 25 years old," Howard M. Held, director of addiction services for the county Health Department, told the commissioners. "This unit would provide treatment 20 hours per week for up to six months, and would include programs not only during the day, but also at night."
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NEWS
April 20, 2008
Buprenorphine - the drug that is being more widely distributed to treat heroin addiction - is showing up with troubling frequency in illegal street sales. Police seizures of bupe in Baltimore and Baltimore County last year were at least twice as high as the year before, while methadone seizures decreased 45 percent. Efforts to control diversion of bupe need to be redoubled. But the drug is still part of the treatment solution to heroin addiction. The extent to which bupe is becoming a black-market product is important as the drug is increasingly being recommended as a treatment option.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | October 14, 1990
Eva Simmons went to court Friday with her life on the line. If she lost her case, she would almost surely die of breast cancer.But she prevailed in the emergency court hearing, and walked out with a judge's order requiring an insurance company to pay for controversial treatment that may be her only chance of beating her advanced case of the disease. With that ruling, the 45-year-old Arnold woman is scheduled to check into the Johns Hopkins Hospital Oncology Center today to begin treatment.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | April 13, 2008
My 220-year-old townhouse has a formal dining room with a pair of tall windows opening onto a busy street. The room gets plenty of daylight but presents privacy issues. We have therefore covered the windows with heavy floor-to-ceiling draperies. But there's little wall space for stacking the draperies and under-curtains when they are not drawn across the windows. Can you suggest a less ponderous treatment that would allow daylight to enter the space while still preserving our privacy? Yours is a situation in which both practical aims can be achieved without resorting to a treatment of questionable stylistic integrity.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
On the final day before retiring, a Howard County Circuit Court master yesterday rebuked the state Department of Juvenile Services for allowing a youth to be dropped from a substance-abuse program because, he alleged, an insurance company wouldn't pay for further treatment after three weeks. Master in Chancery Bernard A. Raum accused the state of shirking its responsibility by permitting an insurance company to dictate the treatment of a 17-year-old Columbia boy who had pleaded guilty to first-degree burglary.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
A man was found suffering from gunshot wounds in the Baltimore Highlands neighborhood early Friday morning. Baltimore police discovered the man at around 12:13 a.m. in the 3700 block of E. Pratt St., according to officials. He was wounded on his left side and right arm. The victim told police he was shot by a man wearing a black face mask, who fired several shots in his direction, as he was walking in the 100 block of S. Dean St. Police said the victim was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 19, 1993
NEW YORK -- Roland Kohloff, principal timpanist of the New York Philharmonic, had such a severe depression last spring that he was forced to stop performing. "I could feel it coming on," he said. "My chemistry was going out and I was totally helpless. You don't want to get out of bed. It's very hard to do anything."Because his son, who has schizophrenia, had been helped by electroshock therapy, Mr. Kohloff decided to forgo medication and talk therapy, and try a treatment that many people associate with oppressive efforts to control the mentally ill in the 1940s and 1950s.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1998
For the past few years, addicts getting methadone and counseling at Glenwood Life Center in Govans battled the elements as well as heroin and other drugs.The roof leaked. Wind blew through the windows. Toilets overflowed. Private talks wafted through thin walls. A radio turned on near a space heater could cause a blackout."It was nice and cool in the winter and nice and hot -- 95 degrees -- in the summer," said Frank Satterfield, executive director.Finally, it's all changed. After five years of planning, the staff and 308 clients of one of the oldest methadone centers in Baltimore, begun in 1971, have just moved into their $1.1 million renovated home at 516 Glenwood Ave."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
A Northeast Baltimore clinic that once pitched on-demand methadone to desperate addicts during the late-night hours is focusing on a new idea — paying addicts to come in for treatment. "We are targeting a non-traditional population of addicts that isn't so interested in treatment," said the Rev. Milton Williams, who runs Turning Point Clinic, housed in his New Life Evangelical Baptist Church. "This will be an incentive. " The state has yet to approve the original on-demand, or "open access" idea, citing federal rules that require, for example, a lengthy examination of anyone getting methadone, a Schedule 2 narcotic.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Matthew Hay Brown and Julie Bell and Matthew Hay Brown,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2005
Before Katrina hit, untold numbers of its victims already were suffering a different kind of wrath: drug addiction. Now, thousands of addicts are thought to be among the hundreds of thousands displaced by the storm, seeking drug fixes, recovery or simple compassion in the new places they are temporarily calling home. The diaspora has created challenges in communities from Alexandria and Baton Rouge, La., to Houston and San Antonio, where taxed addiction counselors already have full caseloads and, in some cases, all staffed treatment beds are full.
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