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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
An attorney representing former 98 Rock DJ Steven G. Smith, better known as Stash, said his client would seek treatment for alcoholism and hoped to return to radio, if not at the same station where he'd been a fixture for more than 20 years. "The problem is with alcohol," attorney Leonard Shapiro said of his client, whose employment at 98 Rock ended this week, days after he was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol. "He knows he's got to get into a treatment program.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer | February 19, 1995
A radium treatment given to hundreds of Maryland children from the 1940s to the 1960s and presumed harmless is being restudied by the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and the National Cancer Institute to determine the cancer risk that might associated with it.Pioneered at Hopkins 70 years ago, nasopharyngeal irradiation was prescribed to correct hearing, sinus and adenoid problems in children. The treatment involved inserting radium-tipped rods into the nose to shrink excess adenoid tissue that had caused the ailments.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | March 3, 2007
The way Sharon Bellamy tells it, her teenage daughter was "out of control" - mouthy, too full of herself for her own good, staying out late, running away. But when 15-year-old Lenisha was caught stealing a cell phone, her mother had had enough: "I was at my wits' end." A court-ordered, months-long, intensive therapy program got mother and daughter on the right track. With a counselor visiting twice weekly, Mom learned how not to take out her frustration on her teenager and Lenisha came to recognize that her mother's rules were the rules of the house.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 22, 2000
BOSTON -- This time, the insurance company is right. This time, the folks whose minds are often clouded by dollars are making sense. And this time, the old familiar scenario -- a patient fighting for payment of life-saving therapy against uncaring insurance company -- is temporarily turned on its head. The Aetna insurance company has announced that it will no longer pay breast cancer patients for bone marrow transplants unless the patients are part of a federally funded experiment. Two weeks after the discovery that a South African researcher phonied up research showing that transplants were more effective than the standard treatment, Aetna stopped funding the therapy that has sent 30,000 women into a roller coaster ride of risk and hope, for very little benefit.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
Luretta Purse never imagined the answer to a throat condition that caused her to shed 52 pounds and constantly pine for food would be one of the world's most potent toxins -- the kind associated with botulism poisoning.Nor, given the life-altering benefits of the treatments, does she care. "It's been a miracle -- I can eat!" Mrs. Purse, of Seaford, Del., said yesterday at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.Mrs. Purse wasn't about to temper her enthusiasm for the treatment that relieved a rare swallowing disorder called acalasia, which caused food to back up in her esophagus rather than drop into her stomach.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
The chief of psychiatry at New York's famed Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center says Americans place a "terrible burden" on themselves and their families when they conclude that something in their own personality has brought on or worsened their cancer.The burden is unfair and unsupported by facts, said Dr. Jimmie C. Holland. "It's enough to get cancer without thinking you brought it on yourself."So far, she said, there is no conclusive evidence that our state of mind has any power to cause cancer or to change its outcome.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | October 8, 1991
Shouting, "No more cuts," about 500 people marched around the War Memorial in Baltimore last night to protest a proposed $450 million in budget cuts that would severely affect social service programs.Some marchers carried signs that urged the governor to "Give us treatment or you'll give us death," and to "Cut waste, not jobs. Raise taxes."The march around the monument, which faces City Hall, took about 20 minutes of a rally that lasted about two hours.Gov. William Donald Schaefer's cuts could mean a loss of $21 million in state aid to Baltimore, city officials said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 19, 1993
NEW YORK -- Roland Kohloff, principal timpanist of the New York Philharmonic, had such a severe depression last spring that he was forced to stop performing. "I could feel it coming on," he said. "My chemistry was going out and I was totally helpless. You don't want to get out of bed. It's very hard to do anything."Because his son, who has schizophrenia, had been helped by electroshock therapy, Mr. Kohloff decided to forgo medication and talk therapy, and try a treatment that many people associate with oppressive efforts to control the mentally ill in the 1940s and 1950s.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2001
County health officials, a deputy state's attorney and drug counselors urged the Carroll commissioners yesterday to develop what officials believe would be the first heroin treatment program for inmates at a Maryland detention center. "We would like to expand services at the Carroll County Detention Center to include an eight-bed unit for heroin users 18 to 25 years old," Howard M. Held, director of addiction services for the county Health Department, told the commissioners. "This unit would provide treatment 20 hours per week for up to six months, and would include programs not only during the day, but also at night."
NEWS
April 20, 2008
Buprenorphine - the drug that is being more widely distributed to treat heroin addiction - is showing up with troubling frequency in illegal street sales. Police seizures of bupe in Baltimore and Baltimore County last year were at least twice as high as the year before, while methadone seizures decreased 45 percent. Efforts to control diversion of bupe need to be redoubled. But the drug is still part of the treatment solution to heroin addiction. The extent to which bupe is becoming a black-market product is important as the drug is increasingly being recommended as a treatment option.
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