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NEWS
May 10, 2012
Isn't it a bit disingenuous for the University of Maryland School of Medicine to use its own research to justify locating a methadone treatment center in the 1100 block of West Pratt Street ("Study: Methadone clinics don't draw crime," May 1)? It's interesting that the school found that convenience stores bring crime to a neighborhood because of the foot traffic they generate. How else would the university describe bringing 600 or so drug addicts a day to a methadone treatment center except as generating foot traffic through the neighborhood?
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Days after the federal government abandoned plans to house immigrant children in a Baltimore office building, the Obama administration has begun to explore other sites in Maryland, including one in Prince George's County, documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun show. On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services evaluated a former residential drug treatment facility in Upper Marlboro with a storied past as the administration struggles to find enough shelter space to contain the recent surge in unaccompanied children crossing the nation's Southwest border.
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NEWS
By Art Kramer and Art Kramer,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
Almost 200 angry residents from Southeast Baltimore and its environs, and most of their elected representatives, shouted down plans last night for a drug and alcohol treatment center in their neighborhood."
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | April 28, 2014
When Samuel Bierman and Zachary Snitzer opened Maryland Addiction Recovery Center last January, they'd done their homework. The co-founders knew they wanted to be in Maryland, particularly Baltimore County. But they chose Towson, where their center is located at 110 West Road, for a few reasons. "It's centralized, and easy to reach," said Bierman, executive director, "and the biggest group needing help are 15-to-30 year-olds. That's a major demographic in this area," a reference to the local college scene.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
A new public residential drug treatment center opened yesterday in Northwest Baltimore - the first new facility in 30 years - and city officials hope it will create more bed space for addicts wishing to become clean. The facility at 4615 Park Heights Ave. will hold 135 people. It will be run by Gaudenzia Inc., a 34-year-old company that has more than 40 treatment sites throughout Pennsylvania. The facility will offer outpatient and residential programs for substance-abuse treatment, as well as prevention and education.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
It will be at least a month until Westminster's Board of Zoning Appeals decides whether a methadone treatment center is allowed in the city's downtown area. On Thursday, the three-member board wrapped up hearing two days of arguments and testimony from city officials, the applicants for the treatment center and numerous residents. In the meantime, attorneys representing the city, the zoning administrator and the applicants are expected to have until Feb. 26 to submit closing arguments and their responses.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
The Carroll commissioners decided yesterday to build a new long-term drug treatment facility on the grounds of Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville, rather than renovate a 53-year-old vacant dormitory on the 500-acre Springfield campus. The decision pivoted on cost, with as much as a $6 million difference between construction and restoration. Once the state made land available on the hospital campus several months ago, building a treatment center became more practical. "A new building makes more sense financially," said Ralph Green, county director of permits and inspections.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Buoyed by an increasing number of drunken-driving arrests, Baltimore County's DWI/Correctional Treatment Facility in Owings Mills -- which celebrates its fifth anniversary this week -- plans to nearly double its size in the next two years.Right Turn of Maryland, which runs the 100-bed facility at Rosewood Center, won state approval to lease two Rosewood buildings and plans to turn them into 40-bed dormitories for women.John Goings, the treatment center director, said Right Turn hopes to open the first 40-bed residence within six months and the second one about a year after that.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2004
The state has given preliminary approval to Carroll County's plans to build a $4 million treatment center for drug addicts on the grounds of the Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville. County officials are negotiating nominal leases, probably $1 a year, with two state agencies - the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the Department of Public Safety and Corrections - for a 7-acre parcel at the southern end of the state hospital for the mentally ill. The land on Buttercup Road adjoins the state Central Laundry Facility, a minimum-security prison for men. "We have had preliminary meetings and verbal concurrence from both agencies," Jolene Sullivan, director of Carroll's Department of Citizen Services, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2002
At 15, Michael King of Dundalk began smoking marijuana and abusing alcohol. "It led to trouble with the law and doing stupid things when I was high," King said. Now 18, King has started 45 days of treatment at Mountain Manor in Irvington, one of two centers where Baltimore County sends teen and adolescent drug abusers to get sober. "I'm hoping that the treatment keeps me on the right path when I go home," said King. Mountain Manor offers a glimpse of the kind of treatment center for youths that Baltimore County officials have said they hope to establish.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 12, 2014
Georgetown University scientists reported this week on what they believe to be a promising - not to mention easy and inexpensive - blood test for Alzheimer's disease. Writing in the journal Nature Medicine, Dr. Howard Federoff and his team reported finding bio markers that were an accurate predictor of the disease 96 percent of the time. There are other tests, including scans, spinal taps and genetic tests, that reveal or predict Alzheimer's, but this blood test has the possibility of becoming something your doctor can order up during an office visit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Kline and For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
Everyone in episode two was acting like someone else, with Carrie imitating Jack Nicholson in "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," Dana emulating Claire Danes in "Romeo + Juliet" and Saul impersonating his own murdered boss and Carrie's nemesis, David Estes. Let's recap. Carrie is in a full-blown mania: paranoid, angry, reckless and loud, loud, loud. She tries to tell “her side” of the story to the press, but the reporter she's sought out looks skeptical of the lady yelling about covert ops and CIA double-dealing.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
The Maryland Department of Juvenile Services will host a public hearing Friday, Sept. 20, from 7 to 9 p.m. regarding the plan to place a new $53 million, 48-bed detention center for girls at 7960 Henryton Road, Marriottsville. The meetings will take place in the auditorium at Liberty High School, 5855 Bartholow Road, Eldersburg, from 7 to 9 p.m. Officials from the department will provide an overview of the project. The site has been state-owned for more than 20 years and was most recently the site of the former Thomas O'Farrell Youth Center, which served as a treatment center for boys until it closed in 2008.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
Youth advocates are questioning whether the Department of Juvenile Services needs to build a new 48-bed detention facility in Carroll County for girls awaiting assignment to one of the state's juvenile treatment centers. At a time when the state should be trying to reduce the number of youths incarcerated in Maryland, they ask, why is it adding to capacity instead? That's a valid point, but the arguments against a new building are still outweighed by the need to replace the state's dilapidated current facility for girls, which is clearly at the end of its useful life and should be closed.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
The state Board of Public Works' vote Wednesday to allow the privately operated Silver Oak Academy juvenile treatment center in Carroll County to double in capacity is regrettable not only because it violates the state's own policy of limiting such facilities to no more than 48 beds but because it sets a troubling precedent for how the state will handle future shortages of treatment slots for juveniles. If the goal is to help troubled youngsters get their lives back on track, the state would have done far better if it had accelerated long-delayed plans to build two new, smaller facilities in Baltimore City and Prince George's County.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
The state Board of Public Works voted Wednesday to allow a Carroll County treatment center for juveniles to double its size to 96 beds — twice the state cap of 48 — despite a policy of sending troubled teens to smaller facilities for treatment. "It's not ideal," Gov. Martin O'Malley, a member of the board, said after voting for the expansion. "It's not ideal at all. " But O'Malley and Sam Abed, Maryland's secretary of juvenile services, said the state had no choice but to allow the privately run Silver Oak facility to expand because more than 40 youths are languishing in state detention centers instead of getting court-mandated treatment.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 10, 2012
Legendary singer-songwriter Judy Collins will be the keynote speaker at the fifth annual Women in Recovery Luncheon May 22 at Father Martin's Ashley, a non-profit alcoholism and drug addiction treatment center near Havre de Grace. The luncheon celebrates and honors the lives of women in recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. Collins overcame addiction when entering treatment in 1978, and has been living a life of recovery for over 30 years, according to her biography. Collins has been a strong advocate for addiction recovery and also suicide prevention since losing her son to suicide.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | November 13, 2007
The way Joseph Carroll sees it, he has a second chance at life with his family. "I'll take that," Carroll, a 59-year-old Army veteran and father of four who brought back from Vietnam a propensity toward alcohol abuse. Now, after a spell on the streets and a five-month stint at The Baltimore Station, a treatment center whose population is made up mostly of military veterans, Carroll plans to return to his wife in Portsmouth, Va., after Thanksgiving. "If she don't change her mind," he said, laughing.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | June 11, 2013
On a sunny afternoon last week, a family could be seen walking inside Hope House Laurel, while two groups of people of varying ages sat in chairs in the shade on the side of the building talking amicably. This private substance abuse treatment center in Laurel's downtown Historic District, formerly known as Reality Inc., was closed for nearly a year, following a drawn out and very public clash between the facility's board and many of its employees over how the center was being managed.
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