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NEWS
November 11, 2011
The unfortunate aspect of all these new ways to communicate is that it gives rise to people believing that they have a right to pass judgment on anyone who makes a mistake and doesn't live up to perfection. Joe Paterno has helped many people over a lifetime and didn't ask for much in return. He committed no crime! As for sins of omission, that is between him and his own God, who is forgiving unlike these perfection zealots who chastise Joe. There comes a time when we all fall short and to ignore all the wonderful accomplishments of this fine man is travesty.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
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NEWS
January 11, 2013
Your recent editorial on the proposed expansion of the Silver Oak Academy juvenile resident treatment facility failed to address the immediate need for additional treatment beds for youthful offenders ("Backsliding at DJS," Jan. 7). Far from "backsliding," the Department of Juvenile Services is showing great foresight in seeking capacity to treat youth who would otherwise be in detention while waiting for a vacant treatment bed and not getting credit for their time in detention. The simple reality is that we do not have enough space in state-run facilities for youth awaiting treatment.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
Olympic swimming champion Michael Phelps plans to enter a six-week in-patient treatment program after his recent drunken-driving arrest, he and his agent said Sunday. The move should help his legal case and boost his public image as he seeks to keep a swimming comeback alive, legal and sports experts said. In statements on social media Sunday morning, Phelps told his fans that he plans to take time off to "attend a program" and focus on his personal life. "I recognize that this is not my first lapse in judgment, and I am extremely disappointed with myself," said Phelps, the most decorated Olympian in history.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
t is clear we need to provide reasonable treatment for the seriously mentally ill who refuse to seek treatment on their own. A clinical review panel of professionals and layment would ensure that mandatory treatment is not abused. Currently, many individuals and their families suffer from lack of mandatory treatment services. Our current laws and practices fail to provide the care needed for the seriously mentally ill. We can do better for our families, our friends and our neighbors.
NEWS
January 6, 2014
Psychiatrists Steven S. Sharfstein and John J. Boronow recently noted that Maryland does not have an assisted outpatient treatment program for people with serious mental illness ( "Close the mental health revolving door," Dec. 29). Assisted outpatient treatment programs allow courts to order a very narrowly defined class of individuals - those with a history of violence, arrest or needless hospitalizations - to stay in treatment as a condition of living in the community. Assisted outpatient programs reduced homelessness, hospitalizations, arrests and incarcerations in New York, California, North Carolina and 39 other states.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | February 11, 2013
Young children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder continue to suffer from severe symptoms even with treatment, a study led by Johns Hopkins Children's Center researchers has found. The study, published online Feb. 11 in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, found that nine out of 10 young children with moderate to severe ADHD experienced symptoms even after treatment. "ADHD is becoming a more common diagnosis in early childhood, so understanding how the disorder progresses in this age group is critical,"  lead investigator Dr. Mark Riddle, a pediatric psychiatrist at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 15, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. Articles  • The age of psychobabble : Weiner could be in treatment for years. ( Politico )  • Payback?  Pakistan arrests bin Laden snitches. ( NY Times) • Constitution, schmonstiution: Boehner issues ultimatum to Obama over Libya.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
Constituents of Rep. Elijah Cummings might want to Google the March 5 House Oversight Committee hearing on the Internal Revenue Service ("Cummings cut off at IRS hearing," March 5). They undoubtedly will be appalled by the rude treatment of our congressman by Chairman Darrell Issa, a California Republican. Rep. Cummings asked for the floor for a procedural question before the hearing was gaveled to an end but was met by Rep. Issa's unacceptable behavior. he ignored Mr. Cummings' question, spoke over him, interrupted him to speak to someone else and then turned off Mr. Cummings microphone, turning his back and finally walking out on him. I would imagine that Mr. Cummings' constituents and indeed his colleagues feel extremely insulted by the rude, uncivil and yes, racist behavior by Mr. Issa.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
The unbelievable turn of events pertaining to the Sun's editorial "Zero tolerance? Zero common sense" (May 10) is something so Kafkaesque that one would never believe it could happen in the good old U.S. of A. Franz Kafka's "The Trail" is a chilling portrayal of society that has gone totally amok and parallels the ridiculousness of Talbot County's school system findings that weapons of mass destruction are inclusive of a cigarette lighter and...
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
In the food world, the battle between serious carnivores and vegetarians is a famous one, with meat-eaters often claiming that without meat, food simply can't be that tasty. Clarksville restaurant Great Sage, which this year celebrates a decade of vegan, organic cookery, proves that even without meat, a meal can be hearty, satisfying and, yes, delicious. Though sometimes the restaurant's laid-back vibe veers into just-plain-slow territory, overall, dinner at Great Sage could win over even the most die-hard meat lover.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. McDaniels and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Busy lives, smartphones and poor sleep habits are all contributing to groggy children suffering from the same sleep disorders as adults. But Dr. Laura Sterni, director of the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Sleep Center at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, said treating sleep ailments in children takes a different approach form that used for adults. How common is it for children to suffer from sleep disorders, and what kinds of sleep disorders do children suffer from? Sleep disorders are very common in children.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Continuing Maryland's push to stem drug abuse, officials sought Wednesday to refocus the annual prescription "take-back" day on treatment and prevention and away from law enforcement. The nationwide take-back day — which is Saturday — has traditionally been used by its sponsors at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to collect expired or unneeded prescription drugs that could be abused if left in family medicine cabinets, or could poison children or pollute the environment.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants the American public to understand that HIV-positive people who receive treatment live longer and healthier lives compared to those who don't receive treatment, and has launched a new nationwide campaign to get the word out. The "HIV Treatment Works" campaign, announced Wednesday, is the CDC's "first communication campaign focused exclusively on encouraging treatment and care for people living with...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Because of advanced treatments, curing prostate cancer has become more common. There now are more than 2.5 million survivors in the United States. Still, many men suffer from side effects after treatment, which may be a deterrent to obtaining care or even discussing the matter with a doctor. But early diagnosis and appropriate treatment will provide the best outcomes, according to Dr. Ira E. Hantman, a urologist with Urology Specialists of Maryland at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on the Columbia Mall shooting, it is vitally important that people not remain silent but intervene to get a mentally disturbed people into treatment ( "With no warning," March 16). The recent Columbia Mall shooting should remind us that, since the Newtown massacre, there have been 44 additional shootings just in schools. Scientific research shows that how the media report on suicide, especially in school-age children, can inadvertently spread the idea - particularly if the coverage is sensationalized.
NEWS
January 14, 2008
As part of their financial "wish list" from the state, Baltimore officials are seeking $15 million to expand drug treatment, including $5 million that would be used to provide more buprenorphine, the synthetic opiate that has proved to be an effective antidote against heroin addiction. There are legitimate concerns - including those raised in a recent series in The Sun - about "bupe" being sold illegally as a street drug. City officials are aware of the concerns and have added important safeguards.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A Toshiba data center has moved into the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, collaborating with the medical institution's radiation oncology department to improve treatment of patients with head and neck or lung cancers. The Toshiba Center for Big Data in Healthcare is based in the East Baltimore research park's Rangos Building at 855 N. Wolfe St. The data center will work with Hopkins researchers to use advanced image analysis and data mining to suggest what outcomes patients could expect from treatment plans based on the outcomes of patients with similar anatomy, physiology, pathology and history.
NEWS
By Janet Simon Schreck | August 21, 2014
While the roles of depression and addiction in Robin William's suicide were the focus of most news stories about his death, perhaps the headlines should have focused on his recent diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, highlighting the intricate relationships between neurological diseases and mental health conditions. The U.S. health care system is woefully inadequate at addressing the overlap between the body, mind and soul in these patients. The anatomical, physiological and neurochemical changes in the brain associated with neurological disorders - such as stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease - can exacerbate or worsen previously existing mental health conditions including depression and anxiety.
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