Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTreat
IN THE NEWS

Treat

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 17, 2010
The op-ed written by Robert Koulish in the March 15 Baltimore Sun ("Punishing immigrants") was interesting. He implies that Illegal immigrants should be allowed to remain in our country, work in our businesses and eat up our taxpayer dollars with education for their children, hospital and doctor coverage paid by our tax dollars, and when caught they should not be sent back to their home country. What other country would allow illegal immigrants to do this? I am sure that if the new health care bill is passed that he would want them to be included.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
Sports Digest | September 29, 2014
Colleges Navy's Williams-Jenkins released from hospital Navy slotback-kick returner Ryan Williams-Jenkins was released from Maryland Shock Trauma Center on Sunday after being treated for a fractured right cheekbone. He suffered the injury, originally reported to involve his neck, when hit head-on by Western Kentucky's Drew Davis while returning a second-quarter kickoff during the Midshipmen's 36-27 loss to the Hilltoppers on Saturday. Field hockey: Senior captain Maxine Fluharty scored two goals Sunday to help No. 4 Maryland (7-2, 2-1 Big Ten)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tribune Newspapers | January 17, 2010
Inside a small stucco pavilion built as a urology clinic - one of the few buildings in the hospital complex deemed structurally sound - patient after patient was wheeled into the makeshift operating room on an old bed Saturday. Workers doused the walls with disinfectant as a couple of nurses prepped the wounded and gave them a bit of anesthesia. Then out came the saws. The work was amputations. On the grounds of the heavily damaged General Hospital, injured people, some with crudely severed limbs, moaned or stared vacantly.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The banned amphetamine that will keep Chris Davis off the baseball diamond for 25 games has become a go-to for stressed college students and worn athletes looking for a quick boost of energy. Adderall acts like a "tremendous jolt of caffeine" that some have used to fight through fatigue before a big test or make it through a tough game, said Eric Strain, director at the Johns Hopkins Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Research. But the drug is not supposed to be used for that and is only approved to treat a few illnesses, including attention-deficit disorder and the sleeping ailment narcolepsy.
FEATURES
By Bo Emerson and Bo Emerson,Cox News Service | April 15, 1992
Eric Beckjord probably lost his audience when he claimed that aliens had sculpted a mammoth likeness of Grumpy the Dwarf among the craters of Mars.The doctors, physicists, psychiatrists, biochemists and others who had gathered in Decatur, Ga., last weekend to discuss crop circles, remote viewing and alien abduction just weren't buying it."This is the kind of thing that gives the study of anomalous phenomena a bad name," grumped Col. John B. Alexander of Santa Fe, N.M., former Green Beret and military intelligence expert.
NEWS
By DENI ELLIOTT and DENI ELLIOTT,Deni Elliott is the director of the Institute for the Study of Applied and Professional Ethics at Dartmouth College. She writes a monthly column for FineLine, a journalism newsletter, and works as an ethics coach in newsrooms | April 28, 1991
Many women have reported rapes in the past several weeks. One, because she identified her rapist as the nephew of Senator Edward Kennedy, has had special treatment by the press.NBC first told us her name. The New York Times repeated it the next day and told us more details: an accounting of her traffic violations, neighbors' speculations about why she didn't marry the father of her child, and the Times' own analysis of how the woman grew from a Midwestern high school girl with a wild streak to a Palm Beach woman of means.
FEATURES
By MATT EASTER and MATT EASTER,SPECIAL TO BALTIMORESUN.COM | October 27, 2005
Today's trick-or-treaters are tomorrow's teenagers. So before you inspire a generation to return in a few years to egg your house, avenging the injustice of receiving horrible candy in their younger days, take some care when deciding what to hand out on Halloween. Halloween candy is a peculiar item, as it seems like it defies the laws of time. Halloween candy trends are the same as they were 20 years ago. In fact, it might be inappropriate to even use the word trend in this situation, as trends are usually associated with new ideas or likes.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 11, 2003
Theatergoers at Company 13 should feel right at home when they see the set for Orphans. That's because the thrift-store furniture on stage bears a remarkable similarity to the thrift-store sofas that serve as audience seating. But if the set - designed by the show's director, W. M. Yarbrough III - looks comfortably broken-in (albeit strewn with debris), the play is considerably less comfortable, and not just because Lyle Kessler's script is intentionally disturbing. It's also uncomfortable because the text is an odd blend of pseudo-David Mamet and John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men. And, Yarbrough's sluggish staging does little to help matters.
NEWS
November 3, 1992
LAST week's biggest trick-or-treat was played on the directors of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland. They tried to give themselves a treat, then thought better of it.As we know from recent accounts in this newspaper, the Blues' directors have lavished themselves and top executives of the health insurer with a vast array of perks, ranging from hospitality tents on Preakness day, to a posh Oriole Park sky box, to membership in the ritzy Caves Valley golf...
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun Reporter | July 28, 2007
A 27-year-old Annapolis man was recovering at Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday after he was stabbed three times in the stomach while trying to save someone from being beaten in Charles Village. The stabbing is the latest in a string of violent assaults in the neighborhood that borders the Johns Hopkins University and is known for its colorfully painted townhouses, busy restaurants and active community association.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
When the first video of Ray Rice dragging his then-fiancee off a casino elevator like a slab of meat appeared, I thought, "God bless TMZ. " With TMZ's release of video today showing him punching Janay Palmer twice and knocking her to the floor, I say, God bless TMZ again and again. You can read what I wrote in February here under the headline: "Ray Rice and how TMZ counters the great American hype machine. " TMZ did the job the mainstream sports media failed to do in showing us the ugliness of this incident.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Offensive lineman Ryan Jensen hadn't felt like his normal self for a long time. He was visibly groggy from a lack of sleep. He was more irritable than usual. And he didn't feel as energetic as he needed to be on the Ravens' practice field. It turned out there was a reason why. Jensen recently was diagnosed with and treated for severe sleep apnea, a life-threatening disorder when left untreated. It also might have played a role in Jensen's being cut by the Ravens on Saturday after a preseason performance the 2013 sixth-round draft pick from Colorado State-Pueblo wasn't pleased with.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Polyurethane foam, long used in products such as bedding, furniture and insulation to make people more comfortable, someday also may save lives. Eight Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering students have devised a tool that may stop profuse bleeding by injecting the foam into those wounded on the battlefield. As a class project, the students chose to tackle the problem of hemorrhaging, the top cause of death for service members in war. Existing devices - tourniquets and medicated bandages - can be unusable or ineffective in wounds to the neck or where limbs meet the torso.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
A child was found alone in a motel room in Towson Thursday morning around 8:30 a.m. The child, a 6-year-old male was taken to a hospital to be treated for severe malnutrition and was still in the hospital as of Friday afternoon. It is unknown when the child will be released. Baltimore County Police have identified the child's parents but no charges have been filed. The state's attorney will determine whether the parents will be charged after the Crimes Against Children Unit has thoroughly investigated the case, police said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
The developer says his planned center for heroin addicts in a North Baltimore neighborhood would be revolutionary: a primary care facility that would treat all aspects of addict's lives, not just dole out methadone. But Harwood residents see it as more of the same for a community they say is already filled with people bused in for addiction services. More addicts, they say, lead to more public urination, drug use and crime. "When the lifeboat is full, the next person being worthy doesn't make it any less likely to sink," said Joe McNeely, president of a neighborhood coalition opposed to the center.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Hip dysplasia may not be obvious in newborns, but the disorder may already be affecting babies' development. And the sooner parents and caregivers get an evaluation and treatment, the easier the fix, according to Dr. Andrew Abramowitz, a board-certified orthopedic surgeon at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center who trained in pediatric orthopedics. What is pediatric hip dysplasia and how common is it? Hip dysplasia (developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH) is a spectrum of abnormalities of the ball and socket joint of the hip. It occurs in one in every 1,000 live births.
NEWS
October 18, 1999
Everyone argues about zero tolerance as if he or she knew what it means. Stop the world! Republican senators want to get off. A guy won the Nobel Prize for Medicine for discovering that proteins carry signals that act as zip codes helping them find their correct locations with the cell. Physicians who actually treat patients without sending bills won the Nobel Prize for Peace. Peter has gone too far this time, expecting the state to honor its side of its own contract.
NEWS
June 14, 1996
Mildred Day,92, who helped develop the chewy, gooey recipe for Rice Krispies Treats, died Sunday in Bloomington, Minn.She worked for Kellogg Co. in the 1920s, when she and Malitta Jensen came up with the treat -- a mixture of Rice Krispies, marshmallows and butter. The treats were a fund-raising venture for a Camp Fire Girls group and a way to promote the cereal.Robert Morey,83, who designed the seal for the U.S. Marshals Service and interested President John F. Kennedy and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy in painting, died of cancer June 5 in Rockport, Mass.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS) is currently treating a 3-year-old mixed breed dog who appears to be the victim of severe abuse. Sophia was brought to the shelter last week by city animal control officers with multiple scars on her face and head and with no lower jaw. She is also missing upper teeth. BARCS officials said the wounds on her face looked to be bite marks. Despite her extensive injuries and clearly traumatic past, Sophia is loving and sweet and still trusts humans, they said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Extra attention to hygiene means fewer germs are infecting people in health care settings these days, but particularly hardy bacteria called Clostridium difficile are defying the trend - and even gaining in strength. Patients endure round after round of antibiotics to knock out the bug, known as C. diff., which causes abdominal pain, extreme diarrhea and potentially fatal inflammation of the colon. Increasingly, however, doctors are turning to a cure that may seem every bit as yucky as the problem.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.